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It Came From The Tube: The Dead Don’T Die (1975)

Director Curtis Harrington always offered up solid, unassuming genre fare on the small screen (How Awful about Allan, the wonderfully goofy Devil Dog: The Hound of Hell); and when he collaborated with noted scribe Robert Bloch (Psycho), the result was NBC’s The Dead Don’t Die (1975), an effective throwback to the Lewton/Turneur era beloved by both, shot through with a big dose of pulpy goodness.

Originally broadcast on January 14th as an NBC World Premiere Movie, Tddd didn’t stand a chance against the likes of the ABC Tuesday Movie of the Week or the ironclad CBS lineup of M*A*S*H/Hawaii Five-o, and Bloch is on the record as not being a fan. Oh well; I still dig its entertaining mashup of neo noir and old fashioned zombies even if he doesn’t. And you might too if that particular elixir peaks your interest.

Crack
See full article at DailyDead »

From VHS to VOD #3

I don’t know if you’re anything like me, but I can often spend hours upon hours trawling through iTunes looking for new movies to buy… Usually I’ll randomly come across a title I haven’t seen in years and use the “Cast & Crew” links to make my way down the rabbit hole to the more obscure side of Apple’s digital movie service.

Now whilst many will decry that iTunes is a terrible VOD service due to Apple’s desire to lock its audience to their platforms, if you have an Apple TV or iPad be aware – there are some truly obscure films hidden away in the depths of the vast collection of movies. Some of which have been made available in the UK for the first time since VHS and a Lot that have been added to the service in their original uncut form!

So, with
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ Director Joachim Rønning in Talks for Michael Crichton’s ‘Micro’

‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ Director Joachim Rønning in Talks for Michael Crichton’s ‘Micro’
Joachim Rønning is in talks with Amblin Entertainment to direct its adaptation of Michael Crichton’s science thriller “Micro.”

Rønning teamed with Espen Sandberg to co-direct “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” and “Kon-Tiki.”

Amblin’s predecessor DreamWorks acquired the film rights in 2015 to “Micro” with Frank Marshall attached to produce. The story follows a group of graduate students lured to Hawaii to work for a mysterious biotech company, only to find themselves miniaturized and cast out into the rainforest with nothing but their scientific expertise and wits to protect them.

Darren Lemke, whose credits include “Goosebumps,” “Turbo,” and “Jack the Giant Slayer,” is attached to write the “Micro” screenplay.

“Micro” was unfinished when Crichton died in 2008, then was completed by author Richard Preston and published by HarperCollins in 2011. Crichton had teamed with Steven Spielberg for mega-hit “Jurassic Park” in 1993, a year before Spielberg co-founded DreamWorks Skg
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The strange prehistory of 1995's Congo

Ryan Lambie Sep 12, 2016

It was a camp classic in 1995, but did you know Congo was once going to be made in the early 80s with a real gorilla and Sean Connery?

"Congo is a dead project that will never be made" - Michael Crichton, 1983

Just about everywhere you looked in the summer of 1995, a pair of simian eyes stared back at you from the poster of Congo. Based on the best-selling Michael Crichton novel, Congo was billed as that year’s equivalent of Jurassic Park - another exciting creature feature with cutting-edge special effects and maybe just a tiny dash of horror.

“It’s a little like Alien at the beginning,” enthused director Frank Marshall, “in that it’s based in science fact, and like Indiana Jones at the end, with the lost city of Zinj.”

Determined to push Congo as a must-see summer film capable of competing with such
See full article at Den of Geek »

Looking back at Michael Crichton's Runaway

Tom Selleck and Gene Simmons starred in Michael Crichton's 1984 sci-fi thriller, Runaway. Ryan looks back at a flawed yet intriguing film...

Late 1984 saw two killer robot movies make their debut in Us cinemas. You've probably heard of the first one, released in October: The Terminator, the film that launched the career of James Cameron and cemented Arnold Schwarzenegger's status as a movie star.

The second was Runaway, another sci-fi thriller that, in theory, could have been the bigger hit. It starred Tom Selleck and Kiss singer-bassist Gene Simmons. It was written and directed by Michael Crichton, the director of the superb Westworld and writer of such best-selling novels as The Andromeda Strain and The Terminal Man, both adapted into great films. Six years after Runaway, Crichton would write Jurassic Park, a book that is still sending ripples through pop culture today.

Runaway ended up making about $7m in
See full article at Den of Geek »

Briefs: When Misty Met Stevie, Utah Buys Itself A Class-Action Lawsuit, and Alexander Skarsgard Naked In The Snow Again

Madame Tussauds in Hollywood unveils its Hugh Jackman

Birthday shoutouts go to Michelle Forbes, who is 49, Stephen Hawking is 72, Dame Shirley Bassey is 77, and David Bowie is 67. What’s his greatest single? Here’s my pick.

EW has the clip of Misty meeting Stevie Nicks on tonight’s Coven. I would probably have the same reaction … plus crap myself.

Utah won’t recognize gay marriages performed before stay. They better be ready to pay out.

Why I Hate ‘Outing’ and How It Lets Aaron Schock Off the Hook

Russell Tovey is happy to play gay.

True Blood Star Alexander Skarsgård Poses Naked After Reaching South Pole.

Sarah Jessica Parker Hints At A Sex And The City Reunion.

Own’s The Haves and The Have Nots returned for Season Two, and was the third highest rated program in the network history.

It’s been a while since we’ve heard from
See full article at The Backlot »

10 Most Enduring CGI Characters Of All Time

CGI (Computer generated/graphic imagery) has increasingly been a dominant source of technology used in cinema… and there’s no going back!

Although the application and contribution of computer graphics to film imagery isn’t a new idea, the rapidly evolving form of ground-breaking technology has amazed us with picture perfect possibilities in film, and animation, throughout the years.

Here is a time-line showing key uses of CGI in cinematic history:

1973: Sci-fi thriller Westworld (directed by Michael Crichton) was the first film to use 2-D image processing to portray the infrared point of view of the Gunslinger android. 1977: Star Wars uses 3-D wireframe graphics for the trench run briefing sequence. 1978: Superman: The Movie is the first film to use CGI in the film’s title sequence. 1981: Looker (also directed by Michael Crichton) introduces Cindy as the first CGI human character. 1985: Barry Levinson’s Young Sherlock Holmes
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

New on Blu-ray: Coma (1978)/Altered States (1980)/Brainstorm (1983)

Coma (1978) Although he’s known primarily as the writer of cutting edge novels like the “Jurassic Park” series, “Congo”, and “The Terminal Man” (among many, many other titles), Michael Crichton was also a director, with his most high-profile decade coming in the ’80s on films like “Looker”, “Runaway” and “Physical Evidence”. One of his earlier films was 1978′s hospital thriller “Coma”, which, ironically enough, is an adaptation of a novel not written by him, but instead an adaptation of a Robin Cook book. The hero of “Coma” is actress Genevieve Bujold, who plays a spunky young MD name Susan Wheeler at a Boston area hospital who discovers that sinister shenanigans are taking place right under her nose. Unfortunately for her, the conspiracy goes right to the very top, which makes her investigation into the situation problematic, not to mention dangerous to her health. Michael Douglas plays Bujold’s boyfriend, a fellow doctor and friendly ear,
See full article at Beyond Hollywood »

From ‘Tron’ to ‘Tron: Legacy’: A Brief History of CGI in the Movies

  • NextMovie
Computer-generated imagery (CGI) has been playing a role in films for over 30 years. It began merely as the ability to draw lines on TV screens but has evolved into nothing short of the power to create worlds.

Beginning with 1981′s “Looker,” in which a naked image of Susan Dey was generated on a computer, and continuing on through “Avatar” (2009) in which a blue, naked, CGI lady flies around on a dragon, determined computer nerds FX pioneers have tirelessly pushed the boundaries of this technology.

With the much anticipated “Tron: Legacy” landing in theaters, we thought it would be a good time to look back on the history of the digital revolution that the original “Tron” helped launch.

Tron’ (1982)

Disney’s “Tron” put CGI in the public eye. In 1976, after encountering the old, old, old-school video game “Pong,” director/animator Steven Lisberger became obsessed with incorporating CGI into films. The graphics
See full article at NextMovie »

Bruce Willis' 'Surrogates': The Reviews Are In!

Is it an 'intense and eerily plausible' thriller, or a boring sci-fi flick saddled with an 'impossible to follow' plot? You decide.

By Eric Ditzian

Bruce Willis in "Surrogates"

Photo: Stephen Vaughn/Touchstone Pictures

Bruce Willis' "Surrogates" asks the following question: Would you like to kick back in the safety of your own home while your much better looking robot double heads out into the world in your stead? That's a question almost everyone in this movie (in theaters Friday, September 25) has answered in the affirmative, which has worked out fairly well until surrogates and their real-life users begin to die. It's up to Willis as FBI Agent Greer to solve the murders and maybe bring humanity out of this techno-induced indolence.

How are critics answering the question of whether or not "Surrogates" is worth checking out this weekend? The reviews are in, and MTV News has gathered them
See full article at MTV Movie News »

Steven Spielberg takes on 'Pirate Latitudes'

Steven Spielberg takes on 'Pirate Latitudes'
It's a seven-year-old boy's dream team -- Steven Spielberg, Michael Crichton and David Koepp moving on from rampaging dinosaurs to marauding pirates.

DreamWorks Studios has acquired the film rights to the action-adventure novel "Pirate Latitudes," which Crichton wrote just before his death in November. Spielberg, who directed Koepp's adaptations of Crichton's "Jurassic Park" and "The Lost World," will produce the film and possibly direct.

Koepp has signed on to adapt.

"Michael was a scrupulous researcher and one of the most innovative writers of our era," said Koepp. "To have gotten to work with one of his novels was a privilege; to work with three seems like a dream."

"Latitudes," which takes place in 1665, is about a daring plan to infiltrate Port Royal, one of the world's richest and most notorious cities, and raid a Spanish galleon filled with treasure. HarperCollins will publish the novel, which Crichton's assistant found in a completed manuscript after his death,
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Cronenberg And Romero Spill Red Ink With New Horror Novels

A new trend appeared this week with famed directors trading in the clapboards and megaphones for inkwells and laptops.  The reverse has happened before with author Michael Crichton directing cinematic classics like Coma, Looker, and Runaway, but I don't recall a director who moved from the big screen to the Kindle... until now.  (There must be previous directors who've written novels so if you know of one, please enlighten me below.) First up, The Independent is reporting (via Fearnet) that David Cronenberg (The Brood, Crash) has just signed a deal for his first novel.  Only forty pages of  "Consumed" have been written so far but that was enough for publisher Fourth Estate to snap up the rights in a "vicious bidding war" that somehow only netted Cronenberg a five-figure sum.  The plot... revolves around a married couple, who are investigative journalists working on two separate stories. The wife is in Paris, delving
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Cinematical Seven: Michael Crichton Movies

Mention the name Michael Crichton to a heavy reader, and they'll probably think of a very smart man who used real science as a springboard for some truly fantastic stories. Mention the name to a movie geek, and their reaction will probably depend on how old the movie geek is. First and foremost I believe Mr. Crichton will be remembered as the author of Jurassic Park, mainly because the book and the film were such massive hits all over the globe. But if you focus solely on the late Michael Crichton's cinematic output, you start to realize what a silly streak the smart man must have had.

Looker (1981, screenwriter / director) -- Once again, a novel concept that's way past its expiration date in 2008, but it's about a plastic surgeon who slowly comes to discover a conspiracy involving computers, supermodels, and TV commercials.

Runaway (1984, screenwriter / director) -- What must have
See full article at Cinematical »

Science fiction luminary Michael Crichton dies at 66

CNN is reporting some sad sad news this morning. Michael Crichton, one of the most influential science fiction authors of my our time, has died of Cancer at the age of 66. What a blow, particularly in light of the fact that his fight was not public.

I grew up on Crichton. Obviously the Jurassic Park team up with him and Spielberg blew everyone away, but I remember watching and loving all the awesome unsung films he directed when I was just a kid. Films like Looker, Coma, and of course Westworld. As a writer he was responsible for The Andromeda Strain, Sphere, Twister, Congo, Terminal Man, 13th Warrior, Timeline, the list of great works goes on and on.

Sad day. Now go watch Coma and Robert Wise's Andromeda Strain.
See full article at QuietEarth »

Rip Michael Crichton

The Los Angeles Times reports that author/screenwriter Michael Crichton died yesterday in La. The creator of Jurassic Park and numerous other science-fiction thrillers, who had been privately battling cancer, was 66.

The Chicago-born Crichton was an English major at Harvard University before dropping out to travel across Europe, then returned to Harvard to study medicine—a background that served him well both in his novels/screenplays and as creator of TV’s hit series ER. His first novel to hit the big screen was The Andromeda Strain, about a team of scientists trying to halt the spread of a deadly extraterrestrial virus, filmed in 1971 by director Robert Wise; a new Andromeda adaptation aired last year on A&E. Crichton made his feature directorial debut (following the 1972 TV movie Pursuit) with 1973’s Westworld, which he also scripted, set in a futuristic amusement park populated by robots that violently turn on the guests.
See full article at Fangoria »

Rip Michael Crichton

The Los Angeles Times reports that author/screenwriter Michael Crichton died yesterday in La. The creator of Jurassic Park and numerous other science-fiction thrillers, who had been privately battling cancer, was 66.

The Chicago-born Crichton was an English major at Harvard University before dropping out to travel across Europe, then returned to Harvard to study medicine—a background that served him well both in his novels/screenplays and as creator of TV’s hit series ER. His first novel to hit the big screen was The Andromeda Strain, about a team of scientists trying to halt the spread of a deadly extraterrestrial virus, filmed in 1971 by director Robert Wise; a new Andromeda adaptation aired last year on A&E. Crichton made his feature directorial debut (following the 1972 TV movie Pursuit) with 1973’s Westworld, which he also scripted, set in a futuristic amusement park populated by robots that violently turn on the guests.
See full article at Fangoria »

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