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Gallipoli (1981) Poster

(1981)

Trivia

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The disastrous charge at The Nek that took place on August 7, 1915 was actually authorized by an Australian officer, not a British one, as depicted in the film. This is a decision that Peter Weir now regrets as he acknowledges that the British made just as valiant a contribution to the campaign as the Australians did.
The movie was heavily criticized for ignoring the British contribution at Gallipoli.
Producers advertised for 400 skilled male horse riders for the movie, yet only 200 turned up for shooting. The remaining 200 horse riders in the movie were women, dressed to look as men.
It took 3 years for the film-makers to secure funding. The reason it took so long was because the Australian government's film agency declined to provide money for it, deeming the film to be "not commercial".
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One of the producers was media mogul Rupert Murdoch. His father, Keith, had been a journalist in World War I. He visited Gallipoli briefly in September 1915 and became an influential agitator against how the British top brass had conducted themselves during the battle.
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For a great deal of the cast and crew, ANZAC Day - the day in Australia that commemorates the war dead - meant little more than a vacation from school. Working on the film made them realize its true significance.
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The music Major Barton is playing the night before the attack is the famous duet from The Pearl Fishers by Georges Bizet, in which two men swear to remain friends and be united until death.
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Although he is seen wearing an AIF uniform, Colonel Robinson is often mistaken for an Englishman due to his accent, which is in fact a clipped Anglo-Australian accent typical of the time and not a deliberate attempt to mislead the audience.
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Carries the disclaimer: "Although based on events which took place on the Gallipoli Peninsula in 1915, the characters portrayed in this film are entirely fictitious."
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With a cost of $2.8 million, Gallipoli (1981) was at the time the most expensive Australian film produced.
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Due to the popularity of the Gallipoli battlefields as a tourist destination, this film is shown nightly in a number of hostels and hotels in several towns on the peninsula.
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Peter Weir was inspired to make the film after visiting a World War I battle site. Originally he and writer David Williamson planned to encompass the entire Gallipoli campaign from all sides but instead opted to focus on one small group of characters who would be able to humanize the whole tragedy.
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At the time of filming, Peter Weir felt that his young star, Mel Gibson, was "full of beans and really with no grand career ambitions".
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David Williamson adapted his screenplay from Bill Gammage's book "The Broken Years" which is a collection of diary excerpts and letters from around 1000 soldiers who all fought at Gallipoli.
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The movie was initially to be made by the South Australian Film Corporation who were the original team behind the production. However, they withdrew support for the film over creative differences over the script. However, the movie was still partially filmed in South Australia: the Gallipoli Peninsula was filmed at Port Lincoln whilst the market sequence was also filmed in South Australia at a fish market.
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The book that Jack reads to the children early in the film is Rudyard Kipling's "The Jungle Book." The part he reads discusses the main character Mowgli's passage to manhood, and for the purposes of the film, foreshadows Archie's passage to manhood as he leaves for the war.
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Shortly after Archie and Frank arrive at Gallipoli they cross through the trenches to try and take what they think is a shortcut to the beach, when the soldier guarding the point informs them it's a shortcut to "the bloody cemetery." The guard is sitting beside a sign that says "Abandon hope past this point." This is a paraphrasing of "Abandon all hope, ye who enter here," a famous line from 14th century poet Dante Alighieri's poem "Inferno," and the inscription above the gate of Hell as the poet walks through it.
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Cameo 

David Williamson:  the writer is the tall dark haired football player who gets tackled hard when the soldiers play football in Egypt.
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