Galaxy of Terror
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

6 items from 2017


Horror Highlights: Ithaca Fantastik Festival 2017, Bram Stoker Busts, Terror At Station 13, Shortwave, 2-headed Shark Attack, Prodigy

27 September 2017 8:01 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Ithaca Fantastik Festival 2017 returns this November in Ithaca, New York, and we have details on what will be screening at the festival, including the new horror comedy Tragedy Girls. Also in today's Highlights: Bram Stoker busts, details on the short film Terror at Station 13, a look at a new teaser trailer for Shortwave, information on 2-Headed Shark Attack screenings, and a new Prodigy teaser trailer.

Ithaca Fantastik Festival 2017 Lineup Announced: Press Release: "Ithaca, NY, September 19, 2017 - The Ithaca Fantastik (If) festival returns to Ithaca, New York, November 3-12, 2017 with a carefully curated selection of new and classic genre films. With less than a month and a half to go, If is announcing exciting changes, its first wave of titles, and a truly inspired retrospective!

Returning audiences will notice an expanded schedule as the festival grows from half a week to a full nine days. The festival’s two weekends will »

- Tamika Jones

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Drive-In Dust Offs: Blue Sunshine (1978)

15 July 2017 11:07 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Weird is a very comfortable word in Jeff Lieberman’s lexicon. From the night crawler nastiness of Squirm (1976) to his mountaintop massacre Just Before Dawn (1981), his films are always a little left of the norm and all the better for it. And in between those two, he decided to take a run at a paranoia thriller nursing a major ‘60s hangover, pulsating with psychotic, Kojakian ex hippies. Welcome to Blue Sunshine (1978), a film more potent than the brown acid your great uncle said he took at Woodstock. (Although he probably wasn’t even there.)

Released Stateside in May (after a stop across the pond at the BFI the previous November) by Cinema Shares International (the fine folks behind Soul Brothers of Kung Fu), Blue Sunshine’s limited run and puzzled looks from critics saw it quickly fade away into cultdom, where it resided for decades with Lieberman’s other films »

- Scott Drebit

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How a low budget film led to James Cameron's Aliens

23 June 2017 7:03 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ryan Lambie Jul 14, 2017

A cult gem in its own right, 1981's Galaxy Of Terror also gave James Cameron his start in big-screen filmmaking...

In most respects, it's pure Roger Corman: low-budget, swiftly made, and loaded with gratuitous gore and bare flesh. But take a closer look at Galaxy Of Terror, the amiably tawdry sci-fi horror flick released by Corman's New World in 1981, and you'll see the creative fingerprints of one James Cameron.

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Directed by Bruce D Clark - who also co-wrote - Galaxy Of Terror slams together the plots of Ridley Scott's Alien and the 50s classic, Forbidden Planet. A group of explorers land on the planet Morganthus, where they discover a huge ancient pyramid; one by one, the visitors are terrorised and killed by monsters from their subconscious. One luckless character is torn apart by claws and tentacles »

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The undersea horror movies of the late 1980s

31 May 2017 4:07 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ryan Lambie Jun 2, 2017

Inspired by James Cameron's The Abyss, the late 80s brought with it a wave of brilliantly cheesy undersea horrors, Ryan writes...

Hollywood studios occasionally have an uncanny knack of announcing almost identical film projects at the same time. In the 1980s, we had rival police dog movies K-9 and Turner And Hooch. The 90s saw the release of rival eruption movies (Dante's Peak and Volcano), opposing killer space rock pictures (Deep Impact and Armageddon) and duelling insect comedies (Antz and A Bug's Life). We provided a detailed run-down on these rival movies back in 2015.

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Around the year 1989, meanwhile, film producers briefly fell in love with a curiously specific genre: undersea sci-fi horror. Between January 1989 and the spring of 1990, no fewer than five films all came out with a similar theme - DeepStar Six was first, followed by Leviathan, Lords Of The Deep, »

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No One Can Hear You Scream: Life and Death in Space Horror

26 March 2017 1:30 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Tony Black on space horror…

The release this week of Life, the new science-fiction horror film from Daniel Espinosa, may herald for many a revelation if they’re unfamiliar with a sub-genre all of its own – the space horror movie. Espinosa’s film is entertaining, if workmanlike, and will be enjoyed primarily by people unfamiliar with the cavalcade of pictures it pilfers from across its running time, but can it really hold a candle to the movies it’s professing to update and sit alongside? That’s arguable.

What matters is the aforementioned sub-genre it now sits within, as it’s as rich and full as the wide variety of other sub-genres in horror or indeed science-fiction. Life, like many other movies we’ll mention here, owes its existence and a huge debt to what may not have been the first sci-fi horror movie, but is undoubtedly still the grandmaster. »

- Tony Black

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From His Secret Passions to His Famous Roots: 13 Things You Never Knew About Bill Paxton

27 February 2017 2:27 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

As one of Hollywood’s best-loved character actors, Bill Paxton — who died at the age of 61 over the weekend following complications from surgery — was a reliable supporting player throughout a wide range of feature films in the ’80s and ’90s. Mourned by fans and peers alike, Paxton was one of the only actors with the distinction of acting in the trilogy of “Big Bad” movies from the ’80s and ’90s — Aliens, Predator and The Terminator — and his scenery-chewing roles in movies like Weird Science and Near Dark made him a beloved presence across decades of cinema. (Paxton did eventually graduate to lead roles, »

- Lisa Ingrassia and Alex Heigl

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

6 items from 2017


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