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Horror Highlights: Ithaca Fantastik Festival 2017, Bram Stoker Busts, Terror At Station 13, Shortwave, 2-headed Shark Attack, Prodigy

  • DailyDead
Ithaca Fantastik Festival 2017 returns this November in Ithaca, New York, and we have details on what will be screening at the festival, including the new horror comedy Tragedy Girls. Also in today's Highlights: Bram Stoker busts, details on the short film Terror at Station 13, a look at a new teaser trailer for Shortwave, information on 2-Headed Shark Attack screenings, and a new Prodigy teaser trailer.

Ithaca Fantastik Festival 2017 Lineup Announced: Press Release: "Ithaca, NY, September 19, 2017 - The Ithaca Fantastik (If) festival returns to Ithaca, New York, November 3-12, 2017 with a carefully curated selection of new and classic genre films. With less than a month and a half to go, If is announcing exciting changes, its first wave of titles, and a truly inspired retrospective!

Returning audiences will notice an expanded schedule as the festival grows from half a week to a full nine days. The festival’s two weekends will
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Drive-In Dust Offs: Blue Sunshine (1978)

  • DailyDead
Weird is a very comfortable word in Jeff Lieberman’s lexicon. From the night crawler nastiness of Squirm (1976) to his mountaintop massacre Just Before Dawn (1981), his films are always a little left of the norm and all the better for it. And in between those two, he decided to take a run at a paranoia thriller nursing a major ‘60s hangover, pulsating with psychotic, Kojakian ex hippies. Welcome to Blue Sunshine (1978), a film more potent than the brown acid your great uncle said he took at Woodstock. (Although he probably wasn’t even there.)

Released Stateside in May (after a stop across the pond at the BFI the previous November) by Cinema Shares International (the fine folks behind Soul Brothers of Kung Fu), Blue Sunshine’s limited run and puzzled looks from critics saw it quickly fade away into cultdom, where it resided for decades with Lieberman’s other films
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How a low budget film led to James Cameron's Aliens

Ryan Lambie Jul 14, 2017

A cult gem in its own right, 1981's Galaxy Of Terror also gave James Cameron his start in big-screen filmmaking...

In most respects, it's pure Roger Corman: low-budget, swiftly made, and loaded with gratuitous gore and bare flesh. But take a closer look at Galaxy Of Terror, the amiably tawdry sci-fi horror flick released by Corman's New World in 1981, and you'll see the creative fingerprints of one James Cameron.

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Directed by Bruce D Clark - who also co-wrote - Galaxy Of Terror slams together the plots of Ridley Scott's Alien and the 50s classic, Forbidden Planet. A group of explorers land on the planet Morganthus, where they discover a huge ancient pyramid; one by one, the visitors are terrorised and killed by monsters from their subconscious. One luckless character is torn apart by claws and tentacles
See full article at Den of Geek »

The undersea horror movies of the late 1980s

Ryan Lambie Jun 2, 2017

Inspired by James Cameron's The Abyss, the late 80s brought with it a wave of brilliantly cheesy undersea horrors, Ryan writes...

Hollywood studios occasionally have an uncanny knack of announcing almost identical film projects at the same time. In the 1980s, we had rival police dog movies K-9 and Turner And Hooch. The 90s saw the release of rival eruption movies (Dante's Peak and Volcano), opposing killer space rock pictures (Deep Impact and Armageddon) and duelling insect comedies (Antz and A Bug's Life). We provided a detailed run-down on these rival movies back in 2015.

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Around the year 1989, meanwhile, film producers briefly fell in love with a curiously specific genre: undersea sci-fi horror. Between January 1989 and the spring of 1990, no fewer than five films all came out with a similar theme - DeepStar Six was first, followed by Leviathan, Lords Of The Deep,
See full article at Den of Geek »

No One Can Hear You Scream: Life and Death in Space Horror

Tony Black on space horror…

The release this week of Life, the new science-fiction horror film from Daniel Espinosa, may herald for many a revelation if they’re unfamiliar with a sub-genre all of its own – the space horror movie. Espinosa’s film is entertaining, if workmanlike, and will be enjoyed primarily by people unfamiliar with the cavalcade of pictures it pilfers from across its running time, but can it really hold a candle to the movies it’s professing to update and sit alongside? That’s arguable.

What matters is the aforementioned sub-genre it now sits within, as it’s as rich and full as the wide variety of other sub-genres in horror or indeed science-fiction. Life, like many other movies we’ll mention here, owes its existence and a huge debt to what may not have been the first sci-fi horror movie, but is undoubtedly still the grandmaster.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

From His Secret Passions to His Famous Roots: 13 Things You Never Knew About Bill Paxton

  • PEOPLE.com
From His Secret Passions to His Famous Roots: 13 Things You Never Knew About Bill Paxton
As one of Hollywood’s best-loved character actors, Bill Paxton — who died at the age of 61 over the weekend following complications from surgery — was a reliable supporting player throughout a wide range of feature films in the ’80s and ’90s. Mourned by fans and peers alike, Paxton was one of the only actors with the distinction of acting in the trilogy of “Big Bad” movies from the ’80s and ’90s — Aliens, Predator and The Terminator — and his scenery-chewing roles in movies like Weird Science and Near Dark made him a beloved presence across decades of cinema. (Paxton did eventually graduate to lead roles,
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Alien: how its physical acting makes a horror classic

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Even shorn of its sound, Alien remains a masterpiece of tension thanks to the power of its physical performances, Ryan writes...

This article contains spoilers for Alien.

When a film works - really, really works - its combination of acting, cinematography, music, sound design, lighting and editing come together so seamlessly that it can become difficult to pin down exactly why it’s so effective. Take Alien for example: beautifully shot by Ridley Scott and cinematographer Derek Vanlint, cut with razor-sharp perfection to Jerry Goldsmith’s piping eerie score, it’s a masterpiece of genre filmmaking.

In the years since Alien’s release in 1979, various aspects of it have been singled out for praise: Hr Giger was rightly handed an Oscar for his part in the seductively hideous xenomorph in its various stages. The film’s story and nightmare imagery is still picked over for its Freudian and feminist subtexts.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Humanoids From The Deep (1980)

  • DailyDead
Well, here we are again, back in Corman waters. Why do we keep coming back? What is the pull of a Roger Corman production that calls to us like a syphilitic siren wailing from the rocks, beckoning us home? My guess is quality chafing the walls of quantity. There are a lot of exploitation movies out there, and most were justified their position on the lower rung of a double bill on a Tuesday night at the drive-in. But un film du Corman is different – he’s always had an innate gift for corralling talent on the rise, and kind enough to foster it on the way down. His turn of the decade monster mash Humanoids from the Deep (1980) is a perfect storm of his wondrous cinematic sensibilities.

And of course I mean ‘wondrous’ as it applies to our station, the gloriously trashy and deliciously weird. Humanoids fits neatly into
See full article at DailyDead »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Galaxy Of Terror

  • DailyDead
By the early ‘80s, Roger Corman was firmly entrenched in the public’s eye as The low budget wizard, always cranking out movies like a reliable sausagemeister. However, to the more discerning trash hound, his films were fertile ground for up and coming filmmakers, a place to learn the craft and hopefully develop one’s own style. And while Galaxy of Terror (1981), a crossbreed of Alien with a strand of Forbidden Planet DNA, does boast one James Cameron among the crew, its most notable feat is being highly entertaining regardless of a decimated budget and convoluted plot.

Released in October of ’81 Stateside by New World Pictures/United Artists, and alternately known as Mindwarp: An Infinity of Terror And Planet of Horrors (Hey Rog – pick one!), GoT cost $700,000 Us, and of course made its money back (Corman almost always saw a return). This was right in the middle of Corman’s space mining – before this,
See full article at DailyDead »

Contest: Win The House Where Evil Dwells / Ghost Warrior on Blu-ray

  • DailyDead
The macabre side of martial arts kicks off the New Year in Scream Factory's Blu-ray of The House Where Evil Dwells and Ghost Warrior. Ahead of the double feature's release tomorrow, we've been provided with three Blu-ray copies to give away.

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Prize Details: (3) Winners will receive (1) Blu-ray copy of The House Where Evil Dwells / Ghost Warrior double feature.

How to Enter: For a chance to win, email contest@dailydead.com with the subject “The House Where Evil Dwells / Ghost Warrior Contest”. Be sure to include your name and mailing address.

Entry Details: The contest will end at 12:01am Est on January 10th. This contest is only open to those who are eighteen years of age or older that live in the United States. Only one entry per household will be accepted.

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From the previous press release: "Scream Factory presents a double dose of samurai action with
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Over Your Dead Body and The House Where Evil Dwells / Ghost Warrior Blu-ray Clips & Trailers

  • DailyDead
Next Tuesday, Takashi Miike's Over Your Dead Body and the macabre martial arts double feature The House Where Evil Dwells / Ghost Warrior will come out on respective Blu-rays from Scream Factory. Ahead of their January 5th debuts, we have high-definition clips and trailers from the films.

Over Your Dead Body Blu-ray: "A beautiful actress (Kô Shibasaki of 47 Ronin and Battle Royale) plays the protagonist in a new play based on a legendary ghost story. She pulls some strings to get her lover cast in the play, although he's a relatively unknown actor. With the cast in place, rehearsals for the play, about an abusive relationship and a grudge, begin. But off stage, some begin to develop their own obsessions. Trapped between the play and reality, they are horrified to find that a real grudge can cross the blurred line between reality and fantasy. Will love flourish? Or has it already turned hideously dark?
See full article at DailyDead »

The House Where Evil Dwells / Ghost Warrior Double Feature Blu-ray Release Details & Cover Art

  • DailyDead
The macabre side of martial arts will kick off the New Year courtesy of the fine folks at Scream Factory, who will release a double-feature Blu-ray of The House Where Evil Dwells and Ghost Warrior on January 5th. Ahead of the films' Blu-ray debuts, we have a look at the double bill's cover art and list of bonus features:

Press Release: Scream Factory presents a double dose of samurai action with The House Where Evil Dwells & Ghost Warrior on Blu-ray on January 5, 2016.

These two martial arts-themed thrillers from the 80s are now finally available for the first time on Blu-ray, in a release including a new high-definition transfer for The House Where Evil Dwells.

The House Where Evil Dwells

A century ago, a samurai brutally murdered his adulterous wife and her lover before taking his own life. Now, the Fletcher family has found what they think is their perfect Japanese
See full article at DailyDead »

Start Your New Year Right When Scream Factory Sends The House Where Evil Dwells & Ghost Warrior To Bluray This January

Scream Factory is doing a hell of a job putting out not only interesting titles by themselves, but double feature Blurays as well. Whether it’s the Tales From The Crypt/Vault Of Horror combo or the upcoming Eliminators/The Dungeon Master double feature, it’s obvious that the gang over at Sf know what their fans want and do a great job of giving it to them.

Joining the Scream Factory double feature lineup, is the January 5th double feature release of The House Where Evil Dwells & Ghost Warrior. It’s interesting to see Sf releasing a double feature of two films that are both martial arts-based horror films, and it shows the versatility that comes with their releases. Will you fright fanatics be picking this one up?

The House Where Evil Dwells

A century ago, a samurai brutally murdered his adulterous wife and her lover before taking his own life.
See full article at Icons of Fright »

15 Guilty Pleasure Horror Films To Watch This Halloween

Dimension Films

Anyone who belongs to a Film Society knows that there’s a difference between the films people claim to admire and what they actually like to watch. Schedule an Ingmar Bergman film and a handful of people might show up, but if it’s a Roger Corman movie, they come running.

In public, these films have to be viewed ironically, with comments such as “they’re so bad they’re good” or “they’re good if you like that sort of thing”, which is understandable – who wants to be marked as a fan of Galaxy Of Terror?

If nothing else, the explosion of media has allowed people to watch what they want when they want, and to hell to with what anyone else thinks. You can read The Imitation Game’s synopsis on Wikipedia for when your Film Society friends mention it, even though you ignored it and
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Blu-ray Release Dates for The Serpent And The Rainbow and The Guardian

  • DailyDead
With Halloween right around the corner, the folks at Scream Factory already have their sights set on the new year with January Blu-ray release dates set for Wes Craven's The Serpent and the Rainbow, William Friedkin's The Guardian, and more.

Scream Factory will release The Serpent and the Rainbow Collector's Edition Blu-ray (originally scheduled to come out this past summer) on January 26th. The company has also slated The Guardian Blu-ray for a January 19th debut and set a January 26th release date for the James Spader-starring Jack's Back Blu-ray / DVD.

Also coming out on Blu-ray in January from the diligent distributor is 1989's Sonny Boy (January 26th) and a double feature of The House Where Evil Dwells and Ghost Warrior (January 5th).

Due out next spring is the Blu-ray debut of 2000's Cherry Falls. Official details and a look at the
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120 Essential Horror Scenes Part 2: Violations

It’s the most uncomfortable type of horror scene, but if done correctly, can pack a gut punch. The violation scene is the moment when the character’s vulnerability is betrayed and our empathy immerses us deeper into their dreadful ordeal. The young child possessed by an evil spirit. The unlucky bystander assaulted in a tunnel. The crazed woman submitting to a creature of non human origin. The violation scene can be emotional or it can be exploitative, but it’s almost always guaranteed to get us talking.

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The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919)- Cesare abducting Jane

Even though it was one of the originators of German Expressionist film, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari is often regarded as the pinnacle for the movement. Two of the movement’s basic tenets were distorted lines and shapes and overly theatrical movements from the actors, and both are well on display in this creepy scene.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

50 forgotten sci-fi films from the 1990s

  • Den of Geek
We may remember Independence Day, The Matrix, The Phantom Menace. But what about these forgotten 90s sci-fi films? And are any worth seeing?

Think back to the science fiction cinema of the 1990s, and some of the decade's biggest box-office hits will immediately spring to mind: The Phantom Menace, Jurassic Park, Independence Day, Men In Black, Armageddon and Terminator 2 were all in the top 20 most lucrative films of the era.

But what about the sci-fi films of the 1990s that failed to make even close to the same cultural and financial impact of those big hitters? These are the films this list is devoted to - the flops, the straight-to-video releases, the low-budget and critically-derided. We've picked 50 live-action films that fit these criteria, and dug them up to see whether they're still worth watching in the 21st century.

So here's a mix of everything from hidden classics to forgettable dreck,
See full article at Den of Geek »

15 of sci-fi cinema's most eccentric spaceships

  • Den of Geek
An alien craft shaped like an artichoke? A vessel with breasts? Here's our pick of 15 of sci-fi cinema's most eccentric spaceships...

For decades, heroes have crossed the universe in rocket ships and modified light freighters. Aliens have conquered galaxies in disc-shaped craft of varying sizes.

Yes, as long as there's been science fiction on the silver screen, spaceships have captured our imagination, from the matinee serials of the 30s to the sci-fi blockbusters of the present.

We all have our own idea of what a great spaceship should look like. For some, it's Han Solo's fastest hunk of junk in the galaxy, the Millennium Falcon. For others, it's the more graceful USS Enterprise, or maybe the utilitarian craft of 2001: A Space Odyssey. But what about cinema's more unusual, outlandish spaceships? The ramshackle ones, the anachronistic ones, the ones that look a bit rude, or just plain scary? Those are
See full article at Den of Geek »

February 24th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Black Sunday, New Year’s Evil

  • DailyDead
For the final week of February, horror fans have several fun cult classics getting a high definition upgrade this Tuesday, including New Year’s Evil from Scream Factory, Larry Cohen’s God Told Me To and the unforgettable Black Sunday from Mario Bava. Also coming to DVD are several indie thrillers including VANish and The Intruders as well as the upcoming horror comedy Amityville Death House and the 70’s shocker A Candle for the Devil (aka It Happened at Nightmare Inn).

Black Sunday- Aip Version (Kino Lorber, Blu-ray)

When Mario Bava's groundbreaking Black Sunday was introduced to the U.S. market, American International Pictures retooled the film for the release. In addition to being redubbed in English, the film was given a new musical score and re-edited.

In one of the most auspicious directorial debuts in movie history, Mario Bava bridged the gap between the gothic horror picture
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February 17th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include V/H/S: Viral, The Phantom of the Opera

  • DailyDead
For the third week of February, Scream Factory is delivering a double dose of terror in their releases of the recent indie horror flick Animal as well as the 1989 cult classic adaptation of The Phantom of the Opera starring Robert Englund and Jill Schoelen.

Magnolia is also bringing us V/H/S: Viral, the latest edition of their popular horror anthology series, home on Blu-ray, DVD and VHS (which is awesome!), and indie genre fans have tons of new titles to look forward to. And for you Game of Thrones fans out there, season four is making its way on Blu and DVD this Tuesday too.

Animal (Scream Factory, Blu-ray/DVD)

When plans for a weekend getaway hit a dead end, a group of close-knit friends finds themselves stranded in unfamiliar territory, pursued by a menacing, bloodthirsty predator. Holed up in an isolated cabin, they turn on one another as
See full article at DailyDead »
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