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The Fox and the Hound (1981) Poster

Trivia

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This film is loosely based on the Daniel P. Mannix novel of the same. Almost every aspect from the novel was either changed or eliminated entirely. In the novel, Tod and Copper were never friends, and met by Tod mocking his human caretaker's neighbor's hounds on their land; Chief's and Copper's ages were reversed and subsequently their roles of who was jealous of whom were reversed; Tod intentionally kills Chief by jumping out of the way of an oncoming train; Tod had two vixens that he mates and has cubs with, all of whom are killed by the hunter; Tod dies from exhaustion while being chased by Copper; the hunter was an old drunk, and the novel ends with the hunter being sent to a retirement home and, because dogs aren't allowed, forced to shoot Copper.
The Bear's snarl is the same snarl as Shere Khan the tiger from The Jungle Book (1967) and Brutus and Nero the crocodiles from The Rescuers (1977).
The name "Tod" is derived from the Middle English word "todde", which means "fox".
The last Disney animated feature to simply end with a "The End; Walt Disney Productions" credit, as with all previous Disney animated films after Alice in Wonderland (1951). (All of the credits were at the beginning.) The next Disney animated feature, The Black Cauldron (1985), was the first one with closing credits.
Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston collaborated on a book in 1993 called "Disney Villains" where they revealed that they do not believe that the bear in this film is a villain as it, much like the rat in Lady and the Tramp (1955), was acting purely out of instinct.
Originally, when Chief got hit by the train, he was supposed to die, which was supposed to fully justify Copper's revenge at Tod. However, for the same reason as Trusty from Lady and the Tramp (1955), some of the crew had qualms against eliminating a main character, mostly because of the risk of the scene being too intense for children.
An uncredited Tim Burton did the character animation for the character Vixey. She was so different from the dark and Gothic-loving Burton's style that he initially only animated her with distant shots; the closeup of her was done when Burton "grew to like her."
This was Disney's first animated feature to use computer graphics. Most of the CGI in this movie is shown during the scene where Amos Slade traps Tod and Vixey in the burrow.
The National Stuttering Project targeted Boomer the stammering woodpecker when protesting the film's release on video.
Production was delayed a year after many of the young animators left to join Don Bluth's studio.
Animator Glen Keane, who was given the task of animating the climactic battle between Tod and the bear, felt that the storyboards he was given were not dramatic enough, so he re-boarded the whole scene. He also planned to draw the fight in charcoal rather than pencil, but budgetary concerns prevented this.
Producer Wolfgang Reitherman brought his son's pet fox in as reference for the animators.
Contrary to popular belief, Kurt Russell did not record his lines for the film in his costume for Escape from New York (1981); which was released the same year as this film. Escape From New York was filmed in the summer of 1980 and finished and released the following year. This film was being animated in 1980 and voices weren't added until almost six months before its completion and release long after the filming and production of Escape from New York would have ended.
When John Lasseter was hired at the Walt Disney Animation Studio, his first job was to do the introduction of Copper. He also collaborated with Glen Keane on the climactic fight scene.
Because of the color of his fur, the Bear is often thought to be an American black bear. However, due to his behavior, size, and visible shoulder hump and claws, it is much more likely that he is a melanistic grizzly bear.
The last Disney feature for animators Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston. Animators and Nine Old Men members Ollie Johnston and Frank Thomas focused most of their efforts on the story of the film.
The last VHS in the "Walt Disney Classics" line. Starting with the video release of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), the home video releases were the "Walt Disney Masterpiece Collection".
Co-director Art Stevens served as the live-action model for Amos Slade.
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Richard Rich's feature film debut as a director.
Two characters, cranes that were to be voiced by Phil Harris and Charo, were deleted from the script during the early stages of production.
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This film was a major project for many newer Disney animators, such as Glen Keane, Mark Henn, Mike Gabriel, and Mark Dindal, who worked as in-betweeners on this movie during the '70s and '80s.
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This is the tenth Disney movie that Kurt Russell has acted in, as well as the only animated one.
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Jackie Cooper was considered for the voice of the adult Copper.
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Lillian Gish and Helen Hayes turned down the voice role of Widow Tweed.
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Two actors played the Bear. Clarence Nash provided the sound of the animal's snarls and roars while Candy Candido did the growls.
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Jack Albertson's last theatrical film, released four months before his death, as well as his only animated film.
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CASTLE THUNDER: Heard during the storm.
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It was originally scheduled to be released on Christmas Day of 1980 before Don Bluth and his colleagues left Walt Disney Productions, so the film's premiere was re-scheduled to July 1981.
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This is the only animated Disney film that stars Pat Buttram, to not star George Lindsay as well.
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It was the last Disney animated film to have all the credits in the opening and only saying "The End, A Walt Disney Production". End credits with popular music songs and/or instrumental music would be used in the future starting with The Black Cauldron (1985).
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It was the final animated Disney film to use the old "Buena Vista" logo at the beginning. The opening logo would be replaced by "Walt Disney Productions presents" with its fantasy castle logo in all future animated films.
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John McIntire and his wife Jeanette Nolan, much like The Rescuers (1977) both voiced characters in the film. McIntire voiced the grumpy badger that Tod meets when dropped off in the forest, while Nolan voiced Tod's human caretaker, widow Tweed.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

Widow Tweed is only mentioned by name when Amos Slade calls her on her Front Door Step, and the only time that he refers to her by Full Name is in the Midquel The Fox and the Hound 2 (2006).
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