Edit
Enter the Ninja (1981) Poster

Trivia

The Kuji-Kiri were the Ninja's Nine Levels of Power. They were 1. Rin - Strength of mind and body. 2. Kyo - Direction of energy. 3. Toh - Harmony with the universe. 4. Sha - Healing of self and others. 5. Kai - Premonition of danger. 6. Jin - Knowing the thoughts of others. 7. Retsu - Mastery of time and space. 8. Zai - Control of the elements of nature. and 9. Zen - Enlightenment.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Franco Nero's voice is completely dubbed entirely because the main character of Cole originates from Texas and Nero didn't have the voice to match either an American or a Texas accent.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Widely considered to be the movie that popularized Ninjutsu during the 1980s, the movie was actually the second major English-language Ninja film of the 1980s as it was preceded by Chuck Norris' The Octagon (1980).
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
After Mike Stone was let go because of his lack of acting ability, Director Menahem Golan found out that Franco Nero was in Manila and quickly approached him for the role and Nero agreed to do the film. Stone stayed on the film as Nero's stunt double and it is Stone who handles the majority of the action sequences as the ninja.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Franco Nero had no martial arts training, so he was doubled by writer and fight choreographer Mike Stone for the fight sequences.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Menahem Golan said of this movie after being asked about this film kick-starting a ninja craze: "It started when Chinese karate films became popular. I looked for something new in Asian martial arts and found information about the Ninja culture in an encyclopedia. The Ninja were middle-class people in Japan--lawyers, government clerks, etc. It was a secret organization that helped the feudal government. It actually preceded the Chinese karate battles. They used very special methods, developing their sixth sense. That fascinated me and I said I could write story ideas out of it, so we made "Enter the Ninja" and American Ninja (1985) later on. Many imitations followed".
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Ninjas are seen in this movie with a full wardrobe of attachments and weapons. These often included a blow-gun, bola (manriki), bow & arrow, nunchaku (nunchuks), sai, shinobi-gatana, shiroken, spear-staff and tonfa.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Originally it was writer and stuntman Mike Stone, a martial arts expert who was cast as Cole and was later replaced by Franco Nero.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
There is no spoken dialog in the first ten minutes of the film.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In this movie, Franco Nero plays an American Ninja. Cannon Films would later produce a five film "American Ninja" series.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The only film in the series to be shot outside the United States.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Emmett Alston was the film's original director. When Charles Bronson refused to allow Menahem Golan to direct Death Wish II (1982), Golan took over directing duties on this movie. Alston went on to direct Force of the Ninja (1988) and Nine Deaths of the Ninja (1985).
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The first of three "Ninja" movies in Cannon's Ninja series. The second and third films were Revenge of the Ninja (1983) and Ninja III: The Domination (1984). Both sequels were unrelated in terms of story. Cannon also went on to make American Ninja (1985) which spawned its own franchise which went to five movies.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
First major role in an English-language film for Shô Kosugi, an actual ninpo practitioner who was also the movie's technical advisor and fight co-ordinator. Kosugi starred in numerous other 1980s ninja movies and appeared in each of this film's sequels but playing different characters.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When this film was being developed and made, the novel "The Ninja" by Eric Van Lustbader had been published in April 1980 and had become quite popular. This movie is not an adaptation of that book which to date [December 2012] has never been filmed.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This film is widely attributed to being the movie that popularized Ninjutsu during the 1980s as several ninja movies were made after it. Prior to the film, judo films had been popular in the 1950s; karate movies in the 1960s and kung-fu pictures in the 1970s.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Three different languages were regularly spoken on the set.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Stuntman and fight and martial arts choreographer Mike Stone is considered the person who conceptualized and originated this movie.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The film's "fight to the death" finale was shot in a real-life cock-fighting ring in the Phillipines.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The movie is often widely believed to have been totally shot in the Phillipines, but some of it was also shot in Japan.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The film's original press kit declared: ". . . the first Western film to deal solely with the mysterious and elusive art of Ninjutsu. It will set the trend in Martial Arts films for the '80s, making them the decade of the Ninja . . .". It added, "In the late fall of 1980, the concept for "Enter the Ninja" was brought to producer/director Menahem Golan. Having never produced a martial arts film, Mr. Golan was a bit difficult to convince at first. He assumed that everything had been done before in martial-arts films, but after he was told about the unique art of Ninjutsu, he immediately began preparations on "Enter the Ninja".
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The film's title was chosen because it was thought that it would connect and cash-in on the popularity of the earlier martial-arts box-office hit Enter the Dragon (1973).
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Not only did Shô Kosugi play The Black Ninja in the film, but at the beginning he also plays one of the red ninjas. It is quite obvious in a two-shot of two red ninjas standing next to the pond; Sho is the red ninja on the right, which is evident by his distinct eyes and the accompanying black eyeliner.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
After seeing three days worth of dailies that were shot in which Menahem Golan felt were boring, he fired original Director Emmett Alston and took over the project himself.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Hazardous fauna abundant during shooting in the forests and jungles of the Phillipines landscape included mosquitoes, snakes and giant lizards.
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Publicity for the film explained that Ninjutsu was "the art of invisibility". The martial art is also known as Ninpo and Ninjitsu-Ryu.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The name of the villain Venarius (Christopher George)'s company was "Venarius Enterprises Inc.".
0 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page