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The Devil and Max Devlin (1981)

Max, a dead corrupt businessman, makes a Faustian pact with Satan's henchman to drive three people to Hell in exchange for longer life. Soon Max realizes that there still may be good in him.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Julie Budd ...
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Big Billy Hunniker
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Nerve Nordlinger
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Jerry Nadler
Deborah Baltzell ...
Heidi
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Greg Weems
Jeannie Wilson ...
Laverne Hunniker
Stanley Brock ...
The Counterman
Ted Zeigler ...
Vic Dunlop ...
Brian
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Chairman of Devil's Council
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Storyline

When Max dies in an accident, he goes straight to hell. But the devil Barney makes him an offer: if he manages to get three innocent youths to sell him their souls in the next two months, he may stay on earth. Max accepts, and returns to earth, equipped with special powers. However his task is harder than expected, especially when 7 years old Tobi demands that he marry his mother. Written by Tom Zoerner <Tom.Zoerner@informatik.uni-erlangen.de>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A new high in being lowdown. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Family | Fantasy

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

6 March 1981 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Diabel i Max Devlin  »

Filming Locations:

 »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$16,000,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This was the first Disney film to contain swearing; the word "damn" is used, as is the phrase "son of a bitch" (albeit unfinished). See more »

Quotes

[from trailer]
Barney Satin: Want a light?
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Bad Movie Beatdown: Dead Men Don't Die (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Roses And Rainbows
Music by Marvin Hamlisch
Lyrics by Carole Bayer Sager
Performed by Julie Budd
See more »

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User Reviews

Significant Disney Movie!
25 March 2001 | by See all my reviews

The really significant part of this movie has nothing to do with the players, but the producers. This is the FIRST ever PG movie released by Disney - after almost 35 years a G-only releases.

I saw this movie as a kid. It had a catchy song - slightly memorable plot and ... well not much else. Not horrible or good. OK.

Sadly, as Disney movies go - you'll notice on the DVD cover - no mention of Disney. Professionals admit their mistakes, are humble in their successes and remain proud about the rest. Walt Disney would have. Eisner doesn't.


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