IMDb > Death Hunt (1981)
Death Hunt
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Death Hunt (1981) More at IMDbPro »

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Death Hunt -- Open-ended Trailer from Anchor Bay Entertainment

Overview

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Director:
Writers:
Michael Grais (written by) and
Mark Victor (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Death Hunt on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
1981 (Turkey) See more »
Tagline:
The Saga Of Two Rivals Who Clash As Enemies And Triumph As Heroes.
Plot:
Canada 1931: The unsociable trapper Johnson lives for himself in the ice-cold mountains near the Yukon river... See more » | Full synopsis »
NewsDesk:
(10 articles)
Prolific Character Actor Ed Lauter Passes Away
 (From The Hollywood News. 17 October 2013, 2:15 AM, PDT)

Character Actor Ed Lauter Dead at 74
 (From WeAreMovieGeeks.com. 16 October 2013, 8:55 PM, PDT)

Fright At Home: August 27th’s DVD & Blu-ray Releases!
 (From Icons of Fright. 27 August 2013, 10:33 PM, PDT)

User Reviews:
The True Story is Fascinating; The Movie is OK See more (53 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Charles Bronson ... Albert Johnson

Lee Marvin ... Millen

Andrew Stevens ... Alvin

Carl Weathers ... Sundog

Ed Lauter ... Hazel

Scott Hylands ... The Pilot

Angie Dickinson ... Vanessa McBride
Henry Beckman ... Bill Luce

William Sanderson ... Ned Warren

Jon Cedar ... Hawkins
James O'Connell ... Hurley

Len Lesser ... Lewis
Richard Davalos ... Beeler (as Dick Davalos)

Maury Chaykin ... Clarence

August Schellenberg ... Deak De Bleargue
Dennis Wallace ... Trapper #1
James McIntire ... Trapper #2
Rayford Barnes ... Trapper #3
Maurice Kowalewski ... Charlie Rat
Sean McCann ... News Reporter
Steve Finkel ... W.W. Douglass (as Steve O.Z. Finkel)
Denis Lacroix ... Jimmy Tom

Tantoo Cardinal ... Indian Woman (as Tantoo Martin)
Amy Marie George ... Buffalo Woman

Directed by
Peter R. Hunt  (as Peter Hunt)
 
Writing credits
Michael Grais (written by) and
Mark Victor (written by)

Produced by
Robert Baylis .... associate producer
Raymond Chow .... executive producer
Albert S. Ruddy .... executive producer
Murray Shostak .... producer
Andre Morgan .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Jerrold Immel 
 
Cinematography by
James Devis (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
John F. Burnett 
Allan Jacobs 
 
Casting by
Reuben Cannon 
 
Production Design by
Ted Haworth 
 
Set Decoration by
Robert R. Benton  (as Bob Benton)
 
Costume Design by
Olga Dimitrov 
 
Makeup Department
Paul LeBlanc .... hair stylist
Bill Morgan .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Les Kimber .... unit production manager
Andre Morgan .... production supervisor (as André Morgan)
Marlene Rubenstein .... post-production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Paul Baxley .... second unit director
Frank Ernst .... first assistant director
Rob Lockwood .... second unit director
David McLeod .... second assistant director (as David MacLeod)
 
Art Department
John 'Frenchie' Berger .... property master (as John Berger)
Tom Doherty .... set designer
 
Sound Department
Ray Alba .... sound designer
Carolyn Colwell .... sound designer
Paul Hochman .... sound designer
David J. Kimball .... sound re-recording mixer
Richard Lightstone .... sound recordist
Robert J. Litt .... sound re-recording mixer
Carl Mahakian .... dialogue editor
Bert Schoenfeld .... sound designer
Elliot Tyson .... sound re-recording mixer
 
Special Effects by
Thomas L. Fisher .... special effects (as Tom Fisher)
John Thomas .... special effects
 
Stunts
Alex Green .... stunt coordinator
Paul Baxley .... stunts (uncredited)
Alex Green .... stunts (uncredited)
John Scott .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Ron Chegwidden .... gaffer
Ron Goodman .... Wesscam operator
Margaret Herron .... Wesscam operator
Michael Kohne .... key grip
Richard Leiterman .... director of photography: second unit
Cameron MacDonald .... camera operator: second unit (as Cam MacDonald)
Rod Parkhurst .... camera operator
Herb Reischl Jr. .... best boy (as Herb Reischl)
Peter K. Smith .... focus puller: second unit
Curtis Petersen .... assistant camera (uncredited)
 
Casting Department
Bryan Gliserman .... extras casting
 
Editorial Department
William Jacobs .... assistant editor
Mario Leone .... assistant editor
Cathy Rose .... apprentice editor
 
Music Department
Jim Henrikson .... music editor (as James Henrikson)
Michael Tronick .... music editor
 
Other crew
Margo Baxley .... assistant to producer
Pamela Carlton .... script supervisor (as Pam Carlton)
David Chan .... assistant to executive in charge of production
Mark Dumas .... animal trainer (as Mark Weiner)
Dennis Grisco .... animal trainer
Terry Guesnel .... animal trainer
Doug Lemmond .... animal trainer
Phill Norman .... title designer
John Scott .... wrangler
Gary Vaughn .... animal trainer
Lacia Kornylo .... production accountant (uncredited)
Michael MacDonald .... location manager (uncredited)
Joe Thornton .... location manager: second unit (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
97 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
This movie was filmed on location in the Canadian Rocky Mountains aka The Canadian Rockies.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: When the posse member puts his arm in the bear trap and it is bleeding you can see the blade bend when he pulls his arm out, because the blades are made of rubber.See more »
Quotes:
Sergeant Edgar Millen:Your father said the best part of you ran down your mama's leg.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in The King of Comedy (1982)See more »
Soundtrack:
For YouSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
71 out of 72 people found the following review useful.
The True Story is Fascinating; The Movie is OK, 30 October 2002
Author: Steve Nyland (Squonkamatic) from New York, USA

I have always been intrigued by this film, mostly because of the fantasy it suggests, and even obtained a VHS copy to look it over more closely. Using the leads posted by other readers, I have been able to glean the following facts from various Internet and library resources concerning the strange tale of The Mad Trapper of Rat River, played in Death Hunt by Charles Bronson;

a] A man referring to himself as Albert Johnson [identified post mortem by associates as Albert Nelson, although that was also an assumed name] arrived in the Aklavik area and brought attention onto himself from a large purchase of ammunition, a new shotgun, and an inexplicable refusal to get himself a trapper's license. Johnson ran afoul of a Constable Edgar Millen [Lee Marvin's character] during the New Years season of 1931-32 after his apparent meddlings with the traps of some of the local types, who suggested that he had gone bonkers in the isolation of the mountains.

b] Two posses did in fact make seperate trips to Johnson's handmade cabin [measuring 8 feet by 8 feet] and one of the Mounties did in fact have a brief encounter with Johnson through an open window; The first time he simply wouldn't answer their knocks, and the second time he shot a Mountie through his closed door with a .38 automatic. A third posse, with Const. Millens, then made the 80 mile dogsled trip and blew up Johnson's cabin after he again refused to acknowledge them.

c] After they blew up his cabin, Johnson did indeed jump up out of a foxhole he had been hiding in, firing a sawed off shotgun and a .22 repeater with the stock removed. The Mounties retreated, and Johnson slipped away in the darkness.

d] A resulting "death hunt" did indeed ensue, set entirely above the arctic circle, and by the first-time ever use of wireless radios by law enforcement, kept the public of Canada and America riveted with their newspaper and wire reports of the two week long manhunt that was the O.J. Simpson crime case of it's day.

Johnson proved a remarkable adversary, using every trick in the book to confound his pursuers, and managed to survive the nightly -40 tempetures with little or no supplies or survival gear. They did manage to corner him on one occasion; there was a gunfight, Constable Millens was killed, and Johnson escaped by climbing a sheer cliff with his bare hands in the dead of night during a blizzard.

e] A bush pilot and former WW1 air ace became involved in the pursuit, not only by resupplying the posse and flying out wounded men, but played an invaluable role in tracking Johnson after he had made his initial escape, using another wireless radio to vector in the ground pursuit in another law enforcement first. He damn near well almost escaped too, though he was finally cut down in a hail of lead after keeping the authorities at bay for 48 days.

f] The whole case was dubbed "The Mad Trapper of Rat River" incident by the press owing to the locals' contention that Johnson had gone cabin happy. He was found to be carrying a $2400 bankroll when searched, and I have found two references to "gold teeth" or gold fillings; The natives of the area had a fable about "The Trapper who steals the gold from men's teeth" that may have been attributed to Johnson after he was found to have some gold dental work in his posession.

Whether they were his or someone else's is unknown, but their presence plus all that cash led to a rumor that he got rich by prying folks' gold fillings out. This has never been substantiated, and the "Mad Trapper" name was pinned to him before these revelations came to light. To this very day, Johnson's actual identity remains a complete mystery, and his bid for freedom one of the most remarkable examples of man surviving the elements.

NOW, with that in mind, Death Hunt's scriptwriters took a few liberties with the facts to create a more romanticized tale;

- Bronson's Abert Johnson is now a decoarted war veteran trained in Special Ops, which accounts for his hardiness, comfort with weapons and wealth of survival skills.

- The conflict with the locals is initiated by having Bronson break up a dog fight, making his character sympathetic when compared to the dirt bags who pick a scrap with him afterwards.

- The dog is then killed to provide Bronson with an understandable motive to blow someone's head off and escalate the confrontation. Poor doggie...

- William Beckamn's character of Old Bill is introduced to provide a way for Bronson's character to survive the film after Lee Marvin manages to blow Bill's face off with a single slug. Nice shootin'.

- Lee Marvin's Sgt. Millens also survives and is credited with the man who killed Albert Johnson. Maybe the producers though this was a way of paying homage to Millen's memory.

- The pilot is turned into a jerk to create a "new world vs. old values" conflict with Marvin, then provided with a machine gun equipped biplane to he can gun down Apollo Creed and reinforce the senselessness of it all. The actual pilot. a Capt. "Wop" May, was widely regarded as a hero for the role he played.

- The film was shot during the spring and summer thaw so that characters could wander around in open jackets and sweaters. Much of the pursuing posse footage looks like it was filmed on a snowed over golf course somewhere; we never get a feel that these men are actually battling against the elements.

- The one scene that Bronson and Marvin share is so strangely shot and edited as to suggest that the two actors were not on the set at the same time. Watch it closely -- you can never see both men's faces in the same shot.

Yet I will always have a soft spot for Death Hunt -- it is probably the first R rated film I ever saw. It would be interesting to see a more historically accurate account of the Mad Trapper comitted to film; think of this as the fanciful and romanticized version.

If you have ever dreamed of taking a pack of supplies, a rifle and a dog up into the mountains and saying To Hell With Civilization, this film was made for you.

Was the above review useful to you?
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