6.9/10
3,999
53 user 39 critic

Cutter's Way (1981)

Richard spots a man dumping a body, and decides to expose the man he thinks is the culprit with his friend Alex Cutter.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay)
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ON DISC
2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
'Mo'
...
Valerie Duran
Stephen Elliott ...
J. J. Cord
Arthur Rosenberg ...
George Swanson
Nina van Pallandt ...
Woman in the Hotel (as Nina Van Pallandt)
...
Mrs. Cord
Geraldine Baron ...
Susie Swanson
Katherine Pass ...
Toyota Woman
...
Toyota Man (as Frank McCarthy)
George Planco ...
Toyota Cop
Jay Fletcher ...
Cord Security Guard
George Dickerson ...
Mortician
Jack Murdock ...
Concession Owner
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Storyline

Alex Cutter (Heard) came back from war minus an eye, a leg, and an arm and mad as hell. He lacks direction, drinks too much, and abuses his wife (Eichhorn). One night his friend Richard Bone (Bridges) witnesses someone dumping something in an alley; it turns out to be the body of a young girl. When Cutter hears about it, he embarks on a crusade to expose the killer, enlisting the help of the murdered girl's sister. Bone reluctantly joins them. Are they right or are they in search of their white whale? Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Cutter does everything his way. Fighting. Loving. Working. Tracking down a killer. See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

10 February 1982 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Cutter and Bone  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

$3,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The eye patch worn by Alex Cutter (John Heard) was worn over the character's left eye. See more »

Goofs

Just after Bone's car breaks down in the alleyway we see a shot of the second car pulling up behind his and stopping. In the following shot from the inside of Bone's car you can see the the headlights of the second car still moving through the back windscreen. See more »

Quotes

Maureen Cutter, 'Mo': [after Alex comes home after a night's drinking] What'll it be, Alex - coffee or sleep?
Alex Cutter: Any other choices?
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Connections

References Gone with the Wind (1939) See more »

Soundtracks

We're Old Enough to Know
Music by Jack Nitzsche
Lyrics by John Byrum
Vocals by Jack Nitzsche
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User Reviews

Don Quixote At The Country Club
20 June 2003 | by (Zurich, Switzerland) – See all my reviews

Cutter's Way cannot be overpraised. This movie is a masterpiece of the first order. Ivan Passer, a compatriot of Milos Forman, came to the USA as an experienced Czech movie director. Not unlike Alfred Hitchcock or some German directors 30 years before him, he seems to have made a thorough analysis of the American social conditions and general manners. He then transformed his findings into movies. Two of them I know deal with New York. They are appropriately gritty. The setting of Cutter's way is a Californian beach community for the rich and beautiful – and the movie is appropriately glossy. The whole story takes place in those paradisiac locales. They are presented like an enchanted kingdom, a country of its own.

Under the glossy surface, there is a darker side to the place. There is prostitution, drug abuse and murder. Cutter, living on the fringes of the enchanted kingdom, sees that more clearly than everyone else. He has his own code of chivalry by which he wants to live. He develops conspirational theories and strains to convert them into hard facts. The world around him, populated by indifferent, amoral rich and beautiful people, does not understand him, does not even want to listen, laughs at him. So Cutter mounts a white stallion and rides a charge.

Repeatedly the film slips into surrealistic situations, in which the impression made on the viewers is more relevant than the storyline. This technique was well known in the forties (e.g. in film noir), present day audience are less used to it. In the earlier days of film making, surrealism was created on a soundstage, and the change between reality and "dream" became immediately clear. Passer uses real locations for situations removed from reality – a daring experiment that rewards the viewers with hauntingly beautiful pictures but might also confuse many. The director took this risk and we are rewarded with a magnificent picture about a distinguished slice of America. I predict: Cutter‘s way will one day become an honored classic.


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