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9th Lumière Festival Launches With Frémaux, Tavernier, Mann, Mitchell, Del Toro, Cuaron, Swinton, Lambert, Brühl

9th Lumière Festival Launches With Frémaux, Tavernier, Mann, Mitchell, Del Toro, Cuaron, Swinton, Lambert, Brühl
Lyon, France — The 9th Lumière Festival opened in Lyon on Saturday with a glitzy and star-studded yet intimate and informal ceremony at the cavernous Halle Tony Garnier, the city’s famed concert hall.

Thierry Frémaux and Bertrand Tavernier, the respective director and president of the Institut Lumière, paid tribute to stars and filmmakers past and present, including a slew of high-profile guests that included Tilda Swinton, who was greeted with an emotional ovation, Michael Mann, Christopher Lambert and Daniel Brühl. Also in attendance were Mexican filmmakers Guillermo Del Toro and Alfonso Cuarón, who the laid-back Fremaux greeted in Spanish with “Hola cabrones!” – a more affectionate salutation than it might seem – and a mariachi band serenade.

It was, however, French actor and rock ‘n’ roll icon Eddy Mitchell, who dazzled the crowd with his entrance. Although he didn’t play live, “Pas de boogie woogie,” his 1976 hit cover of the Jerry Lee Lewis classic, blared as the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: Bertrand Tavernier’s ‘My Journey Through French Cinema’

Film Review: Bertrand Tavernier’s ‘My Journey Through French Cinema’
Whether you already consider yourself an expert on French cinema or are just beginning to explore all the country has to offer, director Bertrand Tavernier’s more-than-three-hour “My Journey Through French Cinema” provides an essential tour through the films that shaped him as a cinephile and storyteller. Clearly modeled after Martin Scorsese’s own made-for-tv journey through American Movies, this incredibly personal and occasionally idiosyncratic labor of love hails from one of the country’s leading experts on the medium, combining a wide-ranging survey with insights that only Tavernier could provide.

A celebrated helmer in his own right, Tavernier counts such masterworks as “A Sunday in the Country” and “Coup de torchon” among his credits. But the director’s contributions to the medium are hardly limited to his own filmography. Like so many French directors of his generation, Tavernier started out as a film critic, studying and championing the work of the era’s leading auteurs. His
See full article at Variety - Film News »

NYC’s Quad Cinema Debuts New Bertrand Tavernier Retrospective; Runs June 20-29

Since revamping and reopening just a handful of months ago, New York City’s The Quad Cinema has become yet another top tier art house offering up some of the year’s most interesting retrospectives and film series. Be it a retrospective for filmmaker Lina Wertmuller or their superlative look at the immigrant experience through a cinematic lens, The Quad has given cinephiles rather frequent occasion to put down their hard earned cash and take in a film or two.

Now, on the occasion of the release of the director’s latest documentary, the theater is commencing yet another revelatory retrospective, this time of an underrated juggernaut of French cinema.

Rarely uttered in the same breath as the true titans of French cinema, director Bertrand Tavernier has cemented himself as one of the nation’s great cinematic artists through his human and humane portraits of various communities. After getting his start as an assistant to director Jean-Pierre Melville, Tavernier would in many ways jettison with stylistic formalism of his contemporaries for pictures that feel far more tactile and loose. Lived in is a term often thrown around with Tavernier’s work, and it’s fitting despite being something of a cliche. Yes, his pictures feel decidedly of one singular voice and worldview, yet there is an audacious energy to each frame that ultimately turns each picture into a vital document of a very specific subculture. Older than many New Wave directors, it’s clear to see that Tavernier would garner much influence from their work, yet he never lost sight of the specificity of his own aesthetic eye.

So, this retrospective couldn’t have come at a more exciting moment. Not only is Tavernier back with a new picture that is a centerpiece of sorts here, but the director is the type of undervalued auteur that is just the type of discovery cineastes crave. Take Death Watch, for example. A gorgeously composed satire that is only more relevant today as its tale of a reporter capturing the last moments of a woman’s life through the camera in his eye is as prescient as ever. Harvey Keitel stars opposite Romy Schneider, both of whom are truly fantastic here, in what plays like a minor work when taken in context of masterpieces like Coup de Torchon, but is a delightful discovery in its own right.

Speaking of Torchon, Tavernier’s masterpiece and still arguably his best picture is part of this 17 film series, as is the brilliant Round Midnight. Starring Dexter Gordon, the film introduces the viewer to a talented yet deeply troubled saxophone player in late 50’s Paris, and is one of Tavernier’s most moving and stylistically exciting works. The music here is recorded live, with Gordon playing opposite legends like Herbie Hancock and the brilliant Freddie Hubbard. It’s this type of tactile vitality that’s a staple of Tavernier’s work, proving the filmmaker to be something far more than the intellectual-turned-critic-turned-filmmaker that he is oft billed as.

But those seeking Tavernier’s critical lens won’t have to look much further than his dry but profoundly dense new film My Journey Through French Cinema. Clocking in at well over three hours, we watch as Tavernier weaves a yarn about ostensibly his experience with cinema of his homeland, going from the works of Jacques Becker to those of the New Wave generation that would come right after he began working. Looking critically at everything from Casque D’Or to Le Petit Soldat, Tavernier takes a similar route as someone like Martin Scorsese, ostensibly building a critical analysis of cinema out of a deeply personal memoir. Built around Tavernier’s own experiences seeing these respective films (even down to the specific theaters he saw them in), French Cinema doesn’t just see the personal nature of its title as a superficiality. While yes, the picture is quite dry and a lengthy watch, there’s something quietly moving about it, turning the often dull “video essay” into something far more captivating.

For more information on this retrospective, head over to The Quad online.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Movie Review: My Journey Through French Cinema is a fond examination of movie minutiae

  • The AV Club
“At the Pathé Journal, I saw a guy next to me open a can of peas, heat it up, and eat it,” recalls Bertrand Tavernier with a survivor’s perverse pride as he describes the widely mythologized Paris movie houses of the 1950s in My Journey Through French Cinema, his smart and gregarious personal tour through the first four or so decades of French sound film. Tavernier himself is one of the most skillful and, in this country, underappreciated French writer-directors of the generation that came after the revolutionary New Wave. In America, he’s probably best known for the Jim Thompson adaptation Coup De Torchon, a film that showcases his dark wit, though his historical dramas (including Captain Conan, Let Joy Reign Supreme, and The Judge And The Assassin) really belong in a class of their own. The best guides to film history are generally opinionated and very personal ...
See full article at The AV Club »

‘Phillauri’ Review: Anushka Sharma Produces a Bollywood Ghost Story That Falls Short of Its Potential

  • Indiewire
‘Phillauri’ Review: Anushka Sharma Produces a Bollywood Ghost Story That Falls Short of Its Potential
Anushka Sharma has, over her nine years in Bollywood, proven herself with powerful roles reflecting both exceptional talent and maturity that have heightened our expectations from her as an actress. The chilling thriller “NH10,” the 2015 maiden feature from her production house Clean Slate Films — one of the few in Bollywood companies helmed by a female actor — more than lived up to the company’s mission to tell risky, non-clichéd stories. Setting all that aside, while Clean Slate’s second release, “Phillauri,” has a promising premise, it’s disappointing to see first-time director Anshai Lal’s primarily play-it-safe treatment and lethargic pacing make it an underwhelming watch.

The story opens with Kanan (Suraj Sharma, of “Life of Pi” fame), who, after a three-year stint making music in Canada, has reluctantly returned home to Amritsar, Punjab to wed his high school sweetheart, Anu (Mehreen Pirzada). His trepidation towards the marriage is only
See full article at Indiewire »

Cinema Paradiso

Giuseppe Tornatore’s ode to the Italian love of movies was a major hit here in 1990, despite being severely cut by Miramax. In 2002 the director reworked his long version into an almost three-hour sentimental epic that enlarges the film’s scope and deepens its sentiments.

Cinema Paradiso

Region B Blu-ray

Arrow Academy

1988 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / Special Edition / 174, 155, 124 min. /

Nuovo cinema Paradiso / Street Date March 21, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Philippe Noiret, Antonella Attili, Salvatore Cascio, Marco Leonardi, Jacques Perrin, Agnese Nano, Brigitte Fossey, Pupella Maggio, Leopoldo Trieste

Cinematography: Blasco Giurato

Production Designer: Andrea Crisanti

Film Editor: Mario Morra

Original Music: Ennio and Andrea Morricone

Produced by Mino Barbera, Franco Cristaldi, Giovanna Romagnoli

Written and Directed by Giuseppe Tornatore

Your average foreign import movie, it seems, makes a brief splash around Oscar time and then disappears as if down a rabbit hole. A few years back I saw a fantastic Argentine movie called The Secret in Their Eyes.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

We Tried It: An Underwater Cycling Class with Olympian Ryan Lochte

  • PEOPLE.com
We Tried It: An Underwater Cycling Class with Olympian Ryan Lochte
What Is It: An underwater cycling class (yes, it’s a thing!) at Aqua studio with Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte

Who Tried It: Writer-Reporter Rose Minutaglio, Editorial Intern Katherine Richter and Editor Catherine Kast

Level of Difficulty: 6 (on a scale of 1 to 10). The class wasn’t as hard as hard we expected. But keeping up with a six-time Olympic gold medalist in the pool? That was exhausting.

Why opt for underwater cycling? You still get the cardio of a land-based class but without the soreness; exercising in the water reduces impact on joints, muscles and bones. Another perk? Underwater cycling
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Oscar Nominee Isabelle Huppert Looks Back at Her Early Career

Oscar Nominee Isabelle Huppert Looks Back at Her Early Career
After a compelling 40-plus-year career, Isabelle Huppert received her first Oscar nomination for her complex performance in Sony Classics’ “Elle.” The recognition was a “This film means so much to me,” she says. “And with this nomination, [director] Paul Verhoeven is also rewarded.” Huppert was raised in the western suburbs of Paris and trained at a conservatory near Versailles.

Variety first noticed Huppert in a July 12, 1972, review of “The Bar at the Crossing,” which starred singer-songwriter Jacques Brel. Her breakthrough was in 1977’s “The Lacemaker,” directed by Claude Goretta. Since then, she has demonstrated her range in such varied films as “Coup de torchon,” “Heaven’s Gate,” “Madame Bovary,” and “The Piano Teacher.” A prolific and versatile star, in the past five years she has chalked up 25 film, TV, and stage performances. Last year, thanks to her role in “Things to Come,” a Variety review dubbed her “our greatest living actress.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Isabelle Huppert May Receive First-Ever Oscar Nomination — Other Greats Who Also Have Zero

  • Scott Feinberg
Isabelle Huppert (Courtesy: Tristan Fewings/Getty Images)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

The best actress Oscar race might seem like a showdown between La La Land’s Emma Stone and Jackie’s Natalie Portman, but Elle’s Isabelle Huppert is proving to be quite the upset. Should Huppert actually snag an Oscar nomination this year, shockingly it would be a first for the French thespian. If Huppert has flown under the Academy’s radar, who else out there is considered the best of the best and hasn’t had a chance to win Hollywood’s biggest award?

Our latest indication of Huppert’s surprise domination this awards season was at the Golden Globes when the 63-year-old won for best actress in a drama and bested Portman — Stone was nominated for best actress in a musical or comedy. Further catapulting Huppert in the best actress Oscar standings was Elle being named best foreign-language film,
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Anushka Sharma’s Clean Slate joins hands with Kriarj Entertainment for upcoming ventures

  • BollywoodHungama
Anushka Sharma’s Clean Slate joins hands with Kriarj Entertainment for upcoming ventures
Fresh from the success of Rustom and the much anticipated Toilet – Ek Prem Katha making all the right noises, Kriarj Entertainment has announced their association with Anushka Sharma and her brother Karnesh’s production banner, Clean Slate Films. Both the companies have joined hands to produce films, the first of which goes on floor inRead More

The post Anushka Sharma’s Clean Slate joins hands with Kriarj Entertainment for upcoming ventures appeared first on Bollywood Hungama.
See full article at BollywoodHungama »

Isabelle Huppert on How She Tackles Difficult Roles Like ‘Elle’

Isabelle Huppert on How She Tackles Difficult Roles Like ‘Elle’
Whereas every other celebrity who visited the sixth-floor Variety Studio at the Toronto Film Festival arrived by elevator, Isabelle Huppert took the stairs — which says a lot about the French star. With a genuine shot at an Oscar nod this year for her daring role in Sony Pictures Classics’ “Elle,” the 63-year-old — who has more nominations for France’s top award, the César, than any other actress (15) — never takes the easy route.

While many actors run from provocative, erotic, or otherwise risqué roles, Huppert is drawn to them — from her early, sexy career turns in “Going Places” and “Coup de torchon” to her most recent Cannes sensation, “Elle,” in which she plays the co-founder of a successful video-game company who reacts in an unexpected way after she is violently raped. At first, the character goes on with her life as if nothing had happened; then, after discovering the identity of her attacker,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

San Sebastian's Zabaltegi competition includes Tavernier, Davies, Jarmusch

San Sebastian's Zabaltegi competition includes Tavernier, Davies, Jarmusch
The Spanish festival reveals titles of the first competitive edition of the Zabaltegi-Tabakalera section that will award a $22,200 (€20,000) prize.

Bertrand Tavernier’s documentary A Journey Through French Cinema, seen at Cannes Classics, will be the opening film of the Zabaltegui-Tabakalera section of the festival, which includes diverse titles that have premiered at other festivals. San Sebastian notes that the section is “open to the most varied and surprising movies of the year.”

The French director has been a San Sebastian regular since 1982, when Coup de Torchon was screened in the Official Selection, and he later was honoured with a retrospective of his films. Two of his titles — It All Starts Today (1999) and Holy Lola (2005) — have landed the audience award. Tavernier was also at the Spanish festival in 2013 where Quai D’Orsay won the best screenplay award.

It’s the first time that the Zabaltegui-Tabakalera section is competitive, with a prize of $22,200 (€20,000) for the winning film. The rest of
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Ashlee Simpson Doesn't 'Cringe' at Her Reality Show Past - But Admits 'I Do Miss Performing'

  • PEOPLE.com
Ashlee Simpson Doesn't 'Cringe' at Her Reality Show Past - But Admits 'I Do Miss Performing'
Many people look back on their early 20s and cringe. But for Ashlee Simpson - who actually had those years documented on her reality show The Ashlee Simpson Show - it was all just a "part of growing up." "There's nothing really too cringeworthy. This was my life," the singer and former reality TV star, 31, told People at Swiffer and Mr. Clean's Clean Slate Workshop Tuesday in New York City. "Looking back, it's all cute. It was so fun," she added, smiling. While she hasn't released any new music since 2012, the mother of two says she "had a great time making" her early albums.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Ashlee Simpson Doesn't 'Cringe' at Her Reality Show Past - But Admits 'I Do Miss Performing'

  • PEOPLE.com
Ashlee Simpson Doesn't 'Cringe' at Her Reality Show Past - But Admits 'I Do Miss Performing'
Many people look back on their early 20s and cringe. But for Ashlee Simpson - who actually had those years documented on her reality show The Ashlee Simpson Show - it was all just a "part of growing up." "There's nothing really too cringeworthy. This was my life," the singer and former reality TV star, 31, told People at Swiffer and Mr. Clean's Clean Slate Workshop Tuesday in New York City. "Looking back, it's all cute. It was so fun," she added, smiling. While she hasn't released any new music since 2012, the mother of two says she "had a great time making" her early albums.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Ashlee Simpson and Evan Ross Show Sweet Pda at an Event in NYC

  • Popsugar
Ashlee Simpson and Evan Ross Show Sweet Pda at an Event in NYC
Ashlee Simpson and Evan Ross were as cute as can be when they popped up at a Swiffer and Mr. Clean event in NYC on Tuesday night. The couple, who tied the knot nearly two years ago, was all smiles as they nuzzled up to one another and snuck in a quick kiss on the red carpet. Later that evening, the mother of two took to Instagram to share a photo from the cleaning workshop, writing, "My hubby @realevanross and I had fun learning some Clean Slate cleaning tips from the expert @mrsilverscott, because it can be hard to stay on top of it with two beautiful babies in the house." This is just the latest we've seen from the pair since their ski trip to Park City, Ut, back in March, though both Evan and Ashlee have been active on Instagram, constantly uploading sweet photos from their home life.
See full article at Popsugar »

Marvelous DA7E: Of Course, Wolverine Is In It

  • LRM Online
As I write this, I’m about to record a podcast that will include a section about Batman V. Superman. It’s been a long week of absorbing people’s opinions and trying to treat everyone’s opinion as valid, but weighed against how rudely they feel that opinion needs to be expressed.

That whole process seemed to have choked the entire internet this week. Not that there wasn’t cool superhero and superhero movie news (that DC Rebirth looks great!), but it all seemed lesser and muted behind the hum of an entire Batman fandom groaning under the weight of everything Dawn of Justice presented.

Take Gambit, for example (please, take Gambit!). Doug Limon (Edge of Tomorrow) is overseeing rewrites on Gambit before directing it and has decided to direct a thrilled called The Wall before even starting production on the superhero film. Although it probably had nothing to
See full article at LRM Online »

Off The Shelf – Episode 83 – New Blu-ray & DVD Releases for Tuesday, March 22nd 2016

In this episode of Off The Shelf, Ryan and Brian take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016.

Subscribe in iTunes or RSS.

Follow-Up Twilight Time Quantity Updates: Used Cars and Center of the Earth Ryan is out of space, but still buying box sets! (Buyers remorse vs unwatched stuff) Hertzfeldt Kickstarter Arrivals News Star Trek: Digital Bits News (Animated Series on Blu-ray, Khan Uhd) Kino Lorber: Fathom, Star Slammer, Modesty Blaise, Gold (1934) Code Red: House on the Edge of the Park, Truck Stop Women, Hot Moves …bucket list fever! Scorpion: The Rift (from the director of Pieces) Blue Underground: Circus of Fear/5 Golden Dragons & The Shape of Things to Come Misc Links Larry Karaszewski on After The Fox Night of the Comet vinyl Kickstarter Links to Amazon After the Fox Bandits Black Mama, White Mama The Black Sleep Breaker! Breaker!
See full article at CriterionCast »

Trey Songz -- Here Ya Go, Uncle Sam ... $750k Ain't a Thang!

  • TMZ
Trey Songz just set a glowing example in the eyes of the IRS by erasing $748,870.08 worth o' debt in less than 3 weeks. The federal tax lien was for Trey's 2013 income. The IRS hit him with the bill on Oct. 8, but according to docs obtained by TMZ, he was able to pay the whole thing off by the 28th. Shows you what kinda deep pockets Trey's got these days. Clean slate with Uncle Sam? Only one
See full article at TMZ »

Beauty and Romanticism in the Films of Maurice Pialat

Early on in her seminal text, From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies, critic Molly Haskell makes dismissive note of the “modern” movie, something that was then purported by many to be a corrective to classical filmmaking. One of its chief tenets, she claimed, was that we came out of the theatre feeling superior to the foibles and insanity of the characters. Furthermore, she points to John Cassavetes’ Minnie & Moskowitz as representational of where modern screen romance stood, claiming its disorganized, improvised approach (“letting it all out”) was a poor substitute for the way an old Hollywood master (e.g. Howard Hawks) created order and understanding out of the chaos of relationships.

If Cassavetes was synonymous with what drove the culture wars of the 1970’s, then what do we make of his supposed compatriots and kindred spirits, particularly Maurice Pialat, the one labelled by many as
See full article at The Film Stage »

Dark Matter Review: Syfy’s New Series Gives Its Characters a Clean Slate

  • Collider.com
There are two things that recommend Syfy’s new series Dark Matter even without knowing anything else about the series. One, it comes from Stargate writers Joseph Mallozzi and Paul Mullie, and two, that it’s adapted from a comic they also created. That creative continuity gives Dark Matter a clear sense of itself from the start, and that confidence in its storytelling allows for the series to march along at a good clip. [caption id="attachment_471433" align="alignright" width="350"] Image via Syfy/caption] Dark Matter focuses on six space travelers who wake up from stasis unable to remember who they are, or what their mission is. To keep things simple, they name themselves One through Six, but their lack of a distinct nomenclature doesn’t mean they don’t have distinct personalities, even if they do fall under reliable sci-fi tropes: One (Marc Bendavid) is the group’s moral compass, while Two (Melissa O’Neil
See full article at Collider.com »
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