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...All the Marbles (1981) Poster

Trivia

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Final film of director Robert Aldrich. After this picture wrapped, Aldrich had surgery which ended in fatal kidney failure. Aldrich had been planning a sequel.
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The male lead was originally written for Paul Newman.
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The movie's finale wrestling match runs for half an hour, around a quarter of the picture's running time. The big fight was staged at the MGM Grand Hotel in Reno, Nevada. Not surprisingly, the studio making the picture was Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM).
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Kathleen Turner auditioned to be one of the female wrestlers.
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Although the film was a box office flop in the USA, it did reasonably well abroad, enough to warrant talk of a sequel that never came to fruition. This was largely due to the death of Robert Aldrich. The sequel was planned to be predominantly set and filmed in Japan.
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When she first met director Robert Aldrich for testing, Laurene Landon mistook him for Robert Altman. Aldrich was reportedly not too amused.
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The picture's American title was changed from "All The Marbles" to "The California Dolls" for release in foreign markets because the phrase "All The Marbles" is an American idiom and not well known outside of the USA.
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Third and final of three pictures that actor Burt Young made with director Robert Aldrich. The others were The Choirboys (1977) and Twilight's Last Gleaming (1977). He was cast here after his appearances in the box-office successful boxing movies Rocky (1976) and Rocky II (1979).
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This women's wrestling picture was the second sports movie helmed by director Robert Aldrich who seven years earlier had directed the prison gridiron football film The Longest Yard (1974).
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The legendary woman wrestler Mildred Burke and two of her pupils (who appear in the first match while the credits roll) trained the two female leads for several weeks. After intensive work, Laurene Landon and Vicki Frederick actually performed the wrestling action without doubles.
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Breakthrough film role and first major film role of actress Laurene Landon. Landon has said that although the movie did not perform well in the USA, it did much better at the box-office in foreign territories.
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Reportedly, the audition process for this movie to cast the two female leads for this film was quite a tough casting call.
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Seventh and final of three pictures that actor Richard Jaeckel made with director Robert Aldrich. The others were Attack (1956), 4 for Texas (1963), The Dirty Dozen (1967), Big Leaguer (1953), Ulzana's Raid (1972) and Twilight's Last Gleaming (1977). They also collaborated on Four Star Playhouse: The Squeeze (1953) for television.
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Part of a cycle of ring fighter movies, mostly boxing, some wrestling, initiated by the box-office and critical success of the Academy Award Best Picture winning boxing movie Rocky (1976). The films include Rocky II (1979), Rocky III (1982), Rocky IV (1985), Tough Enough (1983), Title Shot (1979), Raging Bull (1980), Matilda (1978), The Main Event (1979), The Prize Fighter (1979), The Greatest (1977), Body and Soul (1981), Paradise Alley (1978), The One and Only (1978), Every Which Way But Loose (1978) and Any Which Way You Can (1980).
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In decided contrast with how professional wrestling is usually portrayed, the film promotes the idea of pro wrestling as being real, as spelled out by the Toledo Tigers' manager after the Dolls' first match with them. As he puts it, "Nobody's supposed to win!"
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Cameo 

Joe Greene: "Mean Joe" Greene, the former Pittsburgh Steeler, as himself. Greene retired the year that this movie was launched.
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Chick Hearn: Chick Hearn, the Los Angeles sportscaster, as the announcer for the big match at the end.
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