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Today in Soap Opera History (January 15)

1953: Love of Life's Meg was upset with Vanessa.

1983: Guiding Light's Mike investigated a birth certificate.

1988: General Hospital's Grant tried to kidnap Robin.

1993: NBC aired the final episode of Santa Barbara."History is a vast early warning system."

Norman Cousins

"Today in Soap Opera History" is a collection of the most memorable, interesting and influential events in the history of scripted, serialized programs. From birthdays and anniversaries to scandals and controversies, every day this column celebrates the soap opera in American culture.

On this date in...

1953: On Love of Life, Van (Peggy McCay) and Meg (Jean McBride) were at odds over Meg's son, Beanie (Dennis Parnell). Meg later asked Van, "How can you go on being friends with a man who threatened my life?" McCay left Love of Life in 1955 after 4 years. She currently stars as Caroline Brady on Days of our Lives.

Thanks to
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Donnelly Rhodes Dead at 81

Donnelly Rhodes, a Canadian-born character actor best remembered by daytime drama fans for his portrayal of Phillip Chancellor II on The Young and the Restless, died on Monday at a hospice facility near his home in Maple Ridge, British Columbia. He was 81.

The cause was cancer, his agent, Lisa King, said.

Rhodes's television career began with westerns like Maverick and Bonanza in the early 1960s and continued until 2016. Over the decades he appeared in practically every televised genre, from sitcoms to soap operas.

Although he did not originate the role of Phillip Chancellor II on The Young and the Restless, his portrayal from 1974 to the character's death in 1975 would resonate with viewers and in the storyline, for many years to come. Phillip's wife, Katherine (Jeanne Cooper), was a messy drunk so he turned his attention to the young and beautiful Jill Foster (Brenda Dickson). Phillip and Jill began an affair
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Notes on Streaming: Diabolical Dark, Murderous Mindhunter

In which two Netflix series seek to unsettle and undermine expectations. Let's talk about crime. In the 1970s, U.S. broadcast television networks were awash in weekly crime shows that wrapped up cases in less than an hour. Beginning with Hill Street Blues in 1981, that began to change to more serialized formats, as some cases carried over into multiple episodes; in 1993, NYPD Blue began crossing boundaries as far as the adult nature of content was concerned. More than 20 years later, the television landscape has expanded dramatically and the increasing popularity of streaming services means that Netflix can spend billions of dollars on content annually on an often bewildering variety of films and episodic shows; it's now available in more than 190 countries worldwide....

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Slideshow, Audio: Black Perspectives Red Carpet at 53rd Chicago International Film Festival

Previous | Image 1 of 3 | NextAlfre Woodard at her tribute at the 53rd Chicago International Film Festival.

Chicago – It was an evening to celebrate the Black Perspective in filmmaking at the 53rd Chicago International Film Festival, and also to celebrate one of the great African American actors with a tribute to Alfre Woodard. Woodard walked the Red Carpet on October 21st, 2017, with fellow actors Regina Taylor (“I’ll Fly Away”) and Jussie Smollett (“Empire”).

Alfre Woodard was born in Oklahoma, and studied drama at Boston University. Her breakthrough stage role was in 1977, with “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf,” and her film debut came a year later with “Remember My Name.” After winning an Emmy for a three episode run on TV’s “Hill Street Blues,’ she was hired by the same production team to portray Dr. Roxanne Turner on “St. Elsewhere” from 1985-88. Her film
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

The Top Five Jennifer Tilly Movie Roles of Her Career

Jennifer Tilly is an actress and a professional poker player who was born on September 16, 1958, in Harbor City, Los Angeles. She launched her acting career in 1983 when she had a small role in ‘Hill Street Blues’. She made her film debut the following year when she played Mona in ‘No Small Affair’. She has gone on to build an impressive list of credits as an actress in both film and television. She has also achieved success in her other career as a poker player and is a bracelet winner of the World Series of Poker Ladies’ Event.

The Top Five Jennifer Tilly Movie Roles of Her Career
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Slideshow, Audio: Red-Carpet Portraits from The Second City Roast of George Wendt

Previous | Image 1 of 12 | NextHonoree George Wendt gets ‘roasted.’ Norm!

Chicago – On September 9th, 2017, it seemed like the whole of The Second City theater on Wells Street in Chicago let out a collective cry of “Norm!” The favorite barfly of TV’s “Cheers,” George Wendt, came back to his old comedy stomping ground at The Second City to participate in “I Can’t Believe They Wendt There: The Roast of George Wendt.”

The roasters included the hottest current TV and movie stars, including Bob Odenkirk (“Better Call Saul”), Keegan-Michael Key (“Key & Peele”) and Jason Sudeikis (“Saturday Night Live”), along with The Second City alumni and celebs Julia Sweeney, Betty Thomas and Joel Murray. The roast was a benefit for Gilda’s Club Chicago, the cancer support community named for the late comic legend, Gilda Radner.

In Part One of the Red Carpet interviews, honoree George Wendt does some reminiscing with Jason Sudeikis,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Movies, TV Shows Evolve to Reflect a Changing, More Complex View of Police

Movies, TV Shows Evolve to Reflect a Changing, More Complex View of Police
Even for a journalist like Wesley Lowery, who’s chronicled the real-life killings and raw trauma that police shootings across America have left in their wake, the unyielding depiction in Kathryn Bigelow’s new film “Detroit” of the terror inflicted by three white officers on victims at the Algiers Motel in 1967 was deeply unsettling.

The young black reporter from The Washington Post was only 24 in 2014 when 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., a seminal event that would bring to the fore the debate over race and policing. What most stood out to Lowery in “Detroit” was a rare depiction of police in film: a clear-cut portrayal of racist white officers who violently violated the civil rights of the black Detroit residents.

Bigelow’s movie, which debuts wide in theaters Aug. 4, centers on the race riots of 1967 and the police raid at the Algiers Motel, where
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hulu Adds Himym, NYPD Blue, White Collar, M*A*S*H, Dollhouse and Others

Hulu Adds Himym, NYPD Blue, White Collar, M*A*S*H, Dollhouse and Others
How I Met Your Mother, Burn Notice and the acclaimed Korean War dramedy M*A*S*H are among the series of which Hulu will now be streaming every episode, as part of a monster deal with 20th Century Fox Television Distribution.

Other series set to make their Hulu debut in the coming weeks include Raising Hope, White Collar, The Glades, Dollhouse, NYPD Blue, The Unit, Better Off Ted and Witches of East End.

Additionally, the complete libraries for Glee and Bones will finally be available on the streamer.

RelatedSissy Spacek, Jane Levy Join Cast of Hulu’s Castle Rock

All told,
See full article at TVLine.com »

Platinos to Bestow Lifetime Achievement Award to Edward James Olmos

Platinos to Bestow Lifetime Achievement Award to Edward James Olmos
Film and TV star Edward James Olmos, whose breakout role in hit TV show “Miami Vice” led to a series of prominent roles in such shows as “Hill Street Blues,” “Battlestar Galactica” and “Dexter,” will be receiving a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 4th Platino Ibero-American Film Awards, which are slated for July 22 in Madrid.

Olmos is also renowned for his pivotal big screen role in the original 1982 “Blade Runner” as well as for his Oscar-nominated perf in schoolroom drama “Stand and Deliver.” He stars in the upcoming “Blade Runner” sequel, “Blade Runner 2049,” alongside Harrison Ford, Ryan Gosling and Ana de Armas, and the remake of another sci-fi classic “The Predator,” directed by Shane Black. He also lends his voice to one of the characters in Pixar’s upcoming tribute to Mexican culture “Coco.”

Born in the U.S., but of Mexican descent, Olmos’ role as Lieutenant Castillo in “Miami Vice” earned him a Golden Globe
See full article at Variety - Film News »

From 'Twin Peaks' to 'American Gods': Welcome to the Golden Age of Weird TV

From 'Twin Peaks' to 'American Gods': Welcome to the Golden Age of Weird TV
An FBI agent communicates with an eyeless woman on some cosmic, supernatural plain while a brain on a stalk issues cryptic orders. A living Goddess swallows a grown man into her vagina while in the middle of sexual intercourse. An international-waters orgy climaxes with a priest nearly forced to fornicate with a fake lioness, not long after tying up a man who claims to be God. A lounge-lizard who lives in a luxury igloo (technically, he resides in some sort of psychic limbo) swills cocktails and sprouts beat poetry. And
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The undersea horror movies of the late 1980s

Ryan Lambie Jun 2, 2017

Inspired by James Cameron's The Abyss, the late 80s brought with it a wave of brilliantly cheesy undersea horrors, Ryan writes...

Hollywood studios occasionally have an uncanny knack of announcing almost identical film projects at the same time. In the 1980s, we had rival police dog movies K-9 and Turner And Hooch. The 90s saw the release of rival eruption movies (Dante's Peak and Volcano), opposing killer space rock pictures (Deep Impact and Armageddon) and duelling insect comedies (Antz and A Bug's Life). We provided a detailed run-down on these rival movies back in 2015.

See related  Vikings renewed for season 5

Around the year 1989, meanwhile, film producers briefly fell in love with a curiously specific genre: undersea sci-fi horror. Between January 1989 and the spring of 1990, no fewer than five films all came out with a similar theme - DeepStar Six was first, followed by Leviathan, Lords Of The Deep,
See full article at Den of Geek »

'Twin Peaks' Recap: Keeping Up With the Joneses

'Twin Peaks' Recap: Keeping Up With the Joneses
His name is Dougie Jones. He has a beer gut, a bad haircut, an even worse selection of sportjackets and a penchant for adultery in vacant development housing. And he does not exist.

Dougie is the mystical creation of Agent Dale Cooper's doppelganger – a living, breathing bait-and-switch brought into existence, somehow, to get sucked into the Black Lodge in the evil being's place. So when Coop returns to the real world, it's this poor sap who gets airlifted into the afterlife. The Bad Dale may vomit up poison and get himself arrested,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

How 'Twin Peaks' Brought David Lynch's Warped American Vision to TV

How 'Twin Peaks' Brought David Lynch's Warped American Vision to TV
It's a question we've been asking since the late Seventies: What exactly is David Lynch, and where the fuck did he come from?

With the ballyhooed resurrection of Twin Peaks, his legendary 1990-1991 TV series, Lynch yet again has stepped onto the cultural stage in a big way, and earned his profile as America's bullgoose weirdo. Magazine profiles once again try – and fail – to ascertain who exactly he is and what he's doing. Worse, they try to normalize him, place him within established cultural traditions and treating him like a wise man from Planet Whatzit.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Newswire: Jeffrey Tambor would like to remind you that he’s not “the guy from Ghost”

Jeffrey Tambor is a fantastically prolific actor, appearing in everything from Hill Street Blues to Star Vs. The Forces Of Evil, with a ton of rightly celebrated comedic and dramatic performances in between. One cinematic milestone he was not in, however, was Ghost, as he was forced to remind Ryan Seacrest this week during an appearance on Live With Kelly And Ryan.

Now, given the fact that Tambor mentions that people frequently confuse him with the late Vincent Schiavelli—who played the terrifying Subway Ghost in the aforementioned Patrick Swayze flick—in his new book, and the fact that Seacrest seemed to have a question about the confusion prepped and on-hand, it seems pretty likely that the host’s “flub” was less than genuine. That being said, Tambor’s reaction seems perfectly real, quickly switching into a smirking, pitying faux-anger at Seacrest that’s a lot of fun to behold
See full article at The AV Club »

Ed Sherin, ‘Law & Order’ Ep and Broadway Director, Dies at 87

Ed Sherin, ‘Law & Order’ Ep and Broadway Director, Dies at 87
Ed Sherin, an Emmy-winning “Law & Order” executive producer and acclaimed Broadway director has died. He was 87. The experienced director, whose credits include the films “Valdez is Coming” and “Glory Boy (aka My Old Man’s Place)” as well as TV shows like “Hill Street Blues,” “Moonlighting” and “L.A. Law,” was a member of the Directors’ Guild of America for more than 50 years. Sherin took home one Emmy Award and eight nominations for his work as executive producer and director on Dick Wolf’s police procedural “Law & Order.” For his extensive work in theater, Sherin won a Drama Desk Award for The.
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Law & Order’ Director, DGA Official Ed Sherin Dies at 87

Ed Sherin, who received eight Emmy nominations and won one Emmy for directing and executive producing the series “Law & Order,” died Thursday in Nova Scotia. He was 87.

In addition to his work on “Law & Order,” Sherin also directed episodes of “Hill Street Blues,” “Moonlighting,” “L.A. Law,” “Homicide: Life on the Street” and “Medium.”

Sherin was also active in the Directors Guild of America, including three terms as National Vice President. He was awarded the awarded the Robert B. Aldrich Achievement Award in 2002 for service to the DGA and the DGA Honorary Life Member Award in 2012.

Sherin is survived by his wife, actress Jane Alexander, stepson, actor-director Jace Alexander, and three sons.

After attending Brown University, Sherin served in the armed forces during the Korean War. He began acting in theater and television, and eventually discovered that directing was his passion. He received a Drama Desk Award for “The Great White Hope
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Edwin Sherin, Director of 'The Great White Hope' on Broadway and 'Law & Order,' Dies at 87

Edwin Sherin, Director of 'The Great White Hope' on Broadway and 'Law & Order,' Dies at 87
Edwin Sherin, who directed the original production of James Earl Jones' The Great White Hope to a Pulitzer Prize and the Tony Award for best play, died Thursday in Nova Scotia, the Directors Guild of America announced. He was 87.

Sharin graduated from Brown University and later joined the Armed Forces, serving during the Korean War. Following his success in theater, Sherin went on to direct such films as Valdez Is Coming, starring Burt Lancaster, and My Old Man's Place, with Michael Moriarty, both released in 1971.

His television credits include Hill Street Blues, Moonlighting and L.A. Law. Sherin notably also...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Edwin Sherin, Director of 'The Great White Hope' on Broadway and 'Law & Order,' Dies at 87

Edwin Sherin, who directed the original production of James Earl Jones' The Great White Hope to a Pulitzer Prize and the Tony Award for best play, died Thursday in Nova Scotia, the Directors Guild of America announced. He was 87.

Sharin graduated from Brown University and later joined the Armed Forces, serving during the Korean War. Following his success in theater, Sherin went on to direct such films as Valdez Is Coming, starring Burt Lancaster, and My Old Man's Place, with Michael Moriarty, both released in 1971.

His television credits include Hill Street Blues, Moonlighting and L.A. Law. Sherin notably also...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Twin Peaks Teaser Trailer: 25 Years Later...

When people think of television shows that helped change how people viewed the medium, you think of shows like The Sopranos, Hill Street Blues, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and others. One show that doesn't always get brought up is Twin Peaks. From legendary director David Lynch, the show centered around Agent Dale Cooper, played by Kyle MacLachlan, and his search for the killer of Laura Palmer, played by Sheryl Lee.

The show was groundbreaking. At this point in television history, shows were built mainly around single episodes. While there would occasionally be stories that would have a small arc, each episode would have some sort of a resolution. It was unheard of for a show to have a serialized story, with the thinking that audiences wouldn't be able to pay attention to a story told over many episodes. Twin Peaks changed all that. Most importantly, Twin Peaks was one of
See full article at LRM Online »

Everything That Excites Us About Ben Wheatley’s ‘Freakshift’

First thing: it sounds awesome.

This weekend, Ben Wheatley will unleash his blood-spattered gunfight film Free Fire into movie theaters around the world. And while I may not be the movie’s biggest fan — I’ll discuss it in-depth on Monday’s episode of After the Credits, but suffice to say it’s five pounds of movie in a ten pound bag — I find myself aggressively rooting for it to succeed based entirely on the premise of Wheatley’s next movie. You see, Wheatley is about to make a movie about soldiers fighting mutant crabs in sewers, and that’s a movie the world desperately needs to see. #MakeAmericaFightGiantCrabsAgain, if you prefer. I know the kids are all about a catchy hashtag.

And in celebration of Free Fire’s release, I thought today might be a good time to run down everything we’ve heard about Wheatley’s upcoming movie. Let
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »
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