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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 39 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


‘Bloodline’ Creator Todd Kessler Discusses Netflix Series’ Early Finale, What He’s Got Planned Next

3 August 2017 9:50 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

With Todd Kessler’s intense family drama “Bloodline” finishing its three-season run on Netflix in May — “We never had it in mind that there would be a happy ending or complete resolution,” he says — the executive producer is plotting his next move: a comedy.

The series finale of “Bloodline” came a bit earlier than you expected when Netflix canceled the show. Were you able to write the ending you wanted?

We wanted to bring the audience on a ride with each character, getting to know how complicated the roles are within this family. And we never had it in mind that there would be a happy ending or complete resolution. The desire was to have the audience have a relationship with these characters. And tell a story where we take them on a journey into this tragedy of this family. So the ending we had conceived when we first started the show was tonally right where we »

- Debra Birnbaum

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Movies, TV Shows Evolve to Reflect a Changing, More Complex View of Police

1 August 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Even for a journalist like Wesley Lowery, who’s chronicled the real-life killings and raw trauma that police shootings across America have left in their wake, the unyielding depiction in Kathryn Bigelow’s new film “Detroit” of the terror inflicted by three white officers on victims at the Algiers Motel in 1967 was deeply unsettling.

The young black reporter from The Washington Post was only 24 in 2014 when 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., a seminal event that would bring to the fore the debate over race and policing. What most stood out to Lowery in “Detroit” was a rare depiction of police in film: a clear-cut portrayal of racist white officers who violently violated the civil rights of the black Detroit residents.

Bigelow’s movie, which debuts wide in theaters Aug. 4, centers on the race riots of 1967 and the police raid at the Algiers Motel, where »

- Ricardo Lopez and Ted Johnson

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Movies, TV Shows Evolve to Reflect a Changing, More Complex View of Police

1 August 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Even for a journalist like Wesley Lowery, who’s chronicled the real-life killings and raw trauma that police shootings across America have left in their wake, the unyielding depiction in Kathryn Bigelow’s new film “Detroit” of the terror inflicted by three white officers on victims at the Algiers Motel in 1967 was deeply unsettling.

The young black reporter from The Washington Post was only 24 in 2014 when 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., a seminal event that would bring to the fore the debate over race and policing. What most stood out to Lowery in “Detroit” was a rare depiction of police in film: a clear-cut portrayal of racist white officers who violently violated the civil rights of the black Detroit residents.

Bigelow’s movie, which debuts wide in theaters Aug. 4, centers on the race riots of 1967 and the police raid at the Algiers Motel, where »

- Ricardo Lopez and Ted Johnson

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Nielsen Weaves Views from Hulu, YouTube TV Into Traditional Ratings

25 July 2017 5:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

A not-so-simple question has plagued the TV and advertising industries for years: What is the value of TV programming that is no longer being watched on TV?

A partial answer has arrived.  Nielsen said Tuesday it is now counting views of certain types of programming on Hulu’s live service and YouTube TV, which can then be used as currency in negotiations between TV networks and advertisers. The maneuver would place viewing from so-called “skinny bundles” of programming offered by subscription-video-on-demand players into the mix when Madison Avenue decides what types of content to support.

With the new technology, media companies “are able to measure their content as it flows across platforms, across devices, through whoever is distributing it, then roll it up and include it in their rating numbers,” said Megan Clarken, president of product leadership at Nielsen, in an interview.

The disclosure shows Nielsen attempting to find a solution to a growing problem in the »

- Brian Steinberg

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Hulu Adds Himym, NYPD Blue, White Collar, M*A*S*H, Dollhouse and Others

19 July 2017 10:26 AM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

How I Met Your Mother, Burn Notice and the acclaimed Korean War dramedy M*A*S*H are among the series of which Hulu will now be streaming every episode, as part of a monster deal with 20th Century Fox Television Distribution.

Other series set to make their Hulu debut in the coming weeks include Raising Hope, White Collar, The Glades, Dollhouse, NYPD Blue, The Unit, Better Off Ted and Witches of East End.

Additionally, the complete libraries for Glee and Bones will finally be available on the streamer.

RelatedSissy Spacek, Jane Levy Join Cast of Hulu’s Castle Rock

All told, »

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Platinos to Bestow Lifetime Achievement Award to Edward James Olmos

29 June 2017 2:01 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Film and TV star Edward James Olmos, whose breakout role in hit TV show “Miami Vice” led to a series of prominent roles in such shows as “Hill Street Blues,” “Battlestar Galactica” and “Dexter,” will be receiving a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 4th Platino Ibero-American Film Awards, which are slated for July 22 in Madrid.

Olmos is also renowned for his pivotal big screen role in the original 1982 “Blade Runner” as well as for his Oscar-nominated perf in schoolroom drama “Stand and Deliver.” He stars in the upcoming “Blade Runner” sequel, “Blade Runner 2049,” alongside Harrison Ford, Ryan Gosling and Ana de Armas, and the remake of another sci-fi classic “The Predator,” directed by Shane Black. He also lends his voice to one of the characters in Pixar’s upcoming tribute to Mexican culture “Coco.”

Born in the U.S., but of Mexican descent, Olmos’ role as Lieutenant Castillo in “Miami Vice” earned him a Golden Globe »

- Anna Marie de la Fuente

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From 'Twin Peaks' to 'American Gods': Welcome to the Golden Age of Weird TV

1 June 2017 7:22 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

An FBI agent communicates with an eyeless woman on some cosmic, supernatural plain while a brain on a stalk issues cryptic orders. A living Goddess swallows a grown man into her vagina while in the middle of sexual intercourse. An international-waters orgy climaxes with a priest nearly forced to fornicate with a fake lioness, not long after tying up a man who claims to be God. A lounge-lizard who lives in a luxury igloo (technically, he resides in some sort of psychic limbo) swills cocktails and sprouts beat poetry. And »

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The undersea horror movies of the late 1980s

31 May 2017 4:07 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ryan Lambie Jun 2, 2017

Inspired by James Cameron's The Abyss, the late 80s brought with it a wave of brilliantly cheesy undersea horrors, Ryan writes...

Hollywood studios occasionally have an uncanny knack of announcing almost identical film projects at the same time. In the 1980s, we had rival police dog movies K-9 and Turner And Hooch. The 90s saw the release of rival eruption movies (Dante's Peak and Volcano), opposing killer space rock pictures (Deep Impact and Armageddon) and duelling insect comedies (Antz and A Bug's Life). We provided a detailed run-down on these rival movies back in 2015.

See related  Vikings renewed for season 5

Around the year 1989, meanwhile, film producers briefly fell in love with a curiously specific genre: undersea sci-fi horror. Between January 1989 and the spring of 1990, no fewer than five films all came out with a similar theme - DeepStar Six was first, followed by Leviathan, Lords Of The Deep, »

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'Twin Peaks' Recap: Keeping Up With the Joneses

28 May 2017 7:00 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

His name is Dougie Jones. He has a beer gut, a bad haircut, an even worse selection of sportjackets and a penchant for adultery in vacant development housing. And he does not exist.

Dougie is the mystical creation of Agent Dale Cooper's doppelganger – a living, breathing bait-and-switch brought into existence, somehow, to get sucked into the Black Lodge in the evil being's place. So when Coop returns to the real world, it's this poor sap who gets airlifted into the afterlife. The Bad Dale may vomit up poison and get himself arrested, »

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‘Twin Peaks’ Original Series in 1990: Oddball, but ‘Brilliant Television’

20 May 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

On Sunday, Showtime debuts “Twin Peaks,” a continuation of the 1990 series that is unique in TV history — the show has maintained a fan base after a quarter century, even though there were only 30 episodes, most of them low-rated.

Like the new incarnation, the original “Twin Peaks” was kept in secrecy, but media (and audience) anticipation was high. ABC premiered the two-hour pilot on April 8, 1990, and it was an immediate hit. However, the show quickly faded from view.

Even before it started, Variety predicted it would be a challenge. In a story on Feb. 28, 1990, a few weeks before the debut, Elizabeth Guider wrote that it was much hyped, but “the series represents a ratings risk: It has no big names, no car chases, no glitz, no overt sex or violence. What it does have is an offbeat intelligence at work on a very American kind of story — murder in a small town.”

Twin Peaks »

- Tim Gray

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How 'Twin Peaks' Brought David Lynch's Warped American Vision to TV

19 May 2017 9:30 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

It's a question we've been asking since the late Seventies: What exactly is David Lynch, and where the fuck did he come from?

With the ballyhooed resurrection of Twin Peaks, his legendary 1990-1991 TV series, Lynch yet again has stepped onto the cultural stage in a big way, and earned his profile as America's bullgoose weirdo. Magazine profiles once again try – and fail – to ascertain who exactly he is and what he's doing. Worse, they try to normalize him, place him within established cultural traditions and treating him like a wise man from Planet Whatzit. »

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Newswire: Jeffrey Tambor would like to remind you that he’s not “the guy from Ghost”

17 May 2017 5:04 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Jeffrey Tambor is a fantastically prolific actor, appearing in everything from Hill Street Blues to Star Vs. The Forces Of Evil, with a ton of rightly celebrated comedic and dramatic performances in between. One cinematic milestone he was not in, however, was Ghost, as he was forced to remind Ryan Seacrest this week during an appearance on Live With Kelly And Ryan.

Now, given the fact that Tambor mentions that people frequently confuse him with the late Vincent Schiavelli—who played the terrifying Subway Ghost in the aforementioned Patrick Swayze flick—in his new book, and the fact that Seacrest seemed to have a question about the confusion prepped and on-hand, it seems pretty likely that the host’s “flub” was less than genuine. That being said, Tambor’s reaction seems perfectly real, quickly switching into a smirking, pitying faux-anger at Seacrest that’s a lot of fun to behold »

- William Hughes

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Ed Sherin, ‘Law & Order’ Ep and Broadway Director, Dies at 87

5 May 2017 5:09 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Ed Sherin, an Emmy-winning “Law & Order” executive producer and acclaimed Broadway director has died. He was 87. The experienced director, whose credits include the films “Valdez is Coming” and “Glory Boy (aka My Old Man’s Place)” as well as TV shows like “Hill Street Blues,” “Moonlighting” and “L.A. Law,” was a member of the Directors’ Guild of America for more than 50 years. Sherin took home one Emmy Award and eight nominations for his work as executive producer and director on Dick Wolf’s police procedural “Law & Order.” For his extensive work in theater, Sherin won a Drama Desk Award for The. »

- Reid Nakamura

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‘Law & Order’ Director, DGA Official Ed Sherin Dies at 87

5 May 2017 3:56 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ed Sherin, who received eight Emmy nominations and won one Emmy for directing and executive producing the series “Law & Order,”  died Thursday in Nova Scotia. He was 87.

In addition to his work on “Law & Order,”  Sherin also directed episodes of “Hill Street Blues,” “Moonlighting,”  “L.A. Law,” “Homicide: Life on the Street” and “Medium.”

Sherin was also active in the Directors Guild of America, including three terms as National Vice President. He  was awarded the  awarded the Robert B. Aldrich Achievement Award in 2002 for service to the DGA and the DGA Honorary Life Member Award in 2012.

Sherin is survived by his wife, actress Jane Alexander, stepson, actor-director Jace Alexander, and three sons.

After attending Brown University, Sherin served in the armed forces during the Korean War. He began acting in theater and television, and eventually discovered that directing was his passion. He received a Drama Desk Award for “The Great White Hope »

- Dave McNary

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‘Law & Order’ Director, DGA Official Ed Sherin Dies at 87

5 May 2017 3:56 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Ed Sherin, who received eight Emmy nominations and won one Emmy for directing and executive producing the series “Law & Order,”  died Thursday in Nova Scotia. He was 87.

In addition to his work on “Law & Order,”  Sherin also directed episodes of “Hill Street Blues,” “Moonlighting,”  “L.A. Law,” “Homicide: Life on the Street” and “Medium.”

Sherin was also active in the Directors Guild of America, including three terms as National Vice President. He  was awarded the  awarded the Robert B. Aldrich Achievement Award in 2002 for service to the DGA and the DGA Honorary Life Member Award in 2012.

Sherin is survived by his wife, actress Jane Alexander, stepson, actor-director Jace Alexander, and three sons.

After attending Brown University, Sherin served in the armed forces during the Korean War. He began acting in theater and television, and eventually discovered that directing was his passion. He received a Drama Desk Award for “The Great White Hope” in 1969 and a Tony nomination for »

- Dave McNary

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Edwin Sherin, Director of 'The Great White Hope' on Broadway and 'Law & Order,' Dies at 87

5 May 2017 3:25 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Edwin Sherin, who directed the original production of James Earl Jones' The Great White Hope to a Pulitzer Prize and the Tony Award for best play, died Thursday in Nova Scotia, the Directors Guild of America announced. He was 87.

Sharin graduated from Brown University and later joined the Armed Forces, serving during the Korean War. Following his success in theater, Sherin went on to direct such films as Valdez Is Coming, starring Burt Lancaster, and My Old Man's Place, with Michael Moriarty, both released in 1971.

His television credits include Hill Street Blues, Moonlighting and L.A. Law. Sherin notably also »

- Patrick Shanley

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Edwin Sherin, Director of 'The Great White Hope' on Broadway and 'Law & Order,' Dies at 87

5 May 2017 3:25 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Edwin Sherin, who directed the original production of James Earl Jones' The Great White Hope to a Pulitzer Prize and the Tony Award for best play, died Thursday in Nova Scotia, the Directors Guild of America announced. He was 87.

Sharin graduated from Brown University and later joined the Armed Forces, serving during the Korean War. Following his success in theater, Sherin went on to direct such films as Valdez Is Coming, starring Burt Lancaster, and My Old Man's Place, with Michael Moriarty, both released in 1971.

His television credits include Hill Street Blues, Moonlighting and L.A. Law. Sherin notably also »

- Patrick Shanley

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Twin Peaks Teaser Trailer: 25 Years Later...

4 May 2017 9:45 PM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

When people think of television shows that helped change how people viewed the medium, you think of shows like The Sopranos, Hill Street Blues, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and others. One show that doesn't always get brought up is Twin Peaks. From legendary director David Lynch, the show centered around Agent Dale Cooper, played by Kyle MacLachlan, and his search for the killer of Laura Palmer, played by Sheryl Lee.

The show was groundbreaking. At this point in television history, shows were built mainly around single episodes. While there would occasionally be stories that would have a small arc, each episode would have some sort of a resolution. It was unheard of for a show to have a serialized story, with the thinking that audiences wouldn't be able to pay attention to a story told over many episodes. Twin Peaks changed all that. Most importantly, Twin Peaks was one of »

- Tim Jousma

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Everything That Excites Us About Ben Wheatley’s ‘Freakshift’

21 April 2017 11:55 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

First thing: it sounds awesome.

This weekend, Ben Wheatley will unleash his blood-spattered gunfight film Free Fire into movie theaters around the world. And while I may not be the movie’s biggest fan — I’ll discuss it in-depth on Monday’s episode of After the Credits, but suffice to say it’s five pounds of movie in a ten pound bag — I find myself aggressively rooting for it to succeed based entirely on the premise of Wheatley’s next movie. You see, Wheatley is about to make a movie about soldiers fighting mutant crabs in sewers, and that’s a movie the world desperately needs to see. #MakeAmericaFightGiantCrabsAgain, if you prefer. I know the kids are all about a catchy hashtag.

And in celebration of Free Fire’s release, I thought today might be a good time to run down everything we’ve heard about Wheatley’s upcoming movie. Let »

- Matthew Monagle

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Ben Wheatley compares Alicia Vikander-led Freakshift to “50s B-Movie”

20 April 2017 1:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Over the past decade, through such films as Kill List, High-Rise and Sightseers, it’s become quite clear that Wheatley has no interest in giving audiences the same film they’ve seen a dozen times before. Each one of his films is something idiosyncratic, bold and impossible for any other filmmaker to recreate. With his next film Freakshift, which follows “band of misfit cops who hunt down and kill nocturnal underground monsters,” it sounds like he’ll once again be venturing into some unconventional territory.

While speaking to Collider’s Steve Weintraub to promote his latest film, Free Fire (read our review here), Wheatley was asked about Freakshift and what fans can expect from the film. He replied, “It’s monsters, shotguns, trucks, fighting at night, and it’s in the future, things coming out like crabs. Stuff with claws. That’s the elevator pitch. And August is when we shoot it. »

- Justin Cook

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

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