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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2001

18 items from 2014


Glen Larson obituary

17 November 2014 11:30 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

TV writer and producer behind drama series such as Battlestar Galactica, Knight Rider, Magnum Pi and Quincy

As the creator of TV series such as Battlestar Galactica, Quincy, Magnum Pi and The Fall Guy, the producer and writer Glen Larson, who has died aged 77, was one of the most astute makers of small-screen American dramas in the 1970s and 80s. He made TV gold from the most unlikely material, whether it be a show premised on a talking car (the 1982-86 drama Knight Rider, starring David Hasselhoff as a crime fighter aided by a Pontiac Trans Am with artificial intelligence), a culture-clash cop show featuring a sheriff from New Mexico transferred with his horse to crime-fighting in Manhattan (the 1970-77 series McCloud, starring Dennis Weaver) or the Mormon beliefs that he mobilised in the creation of the science-fiction series Battlestar Galactica (1978).

Larson also used the musical skills he had developed »

- Stuart Jeffries

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R.I.P. Glen Larson

16 November 2014 9:44 PM, PST | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Tributes have been flying back and forth this weekend in the wake of the death of legendary TV creator Glen A. Larson who passed away from esophageal cancer at the age of 77.

Larson was the man behind a dozen hit television series in the 1970s and 1980s including the original "Battlestar Galactica," "Knight Rider," "Magnum P.I.," "Manimal," "The Fall Guy," "Quincey M.E.," "Alias Smith And Jones" and "Buck Rogers in the 25th Century".

He also wrote the theme songs for both "Knight Rider" and "The Six Million Dollar Man," and won several Emmys for his writing work which included shows like "McCloud" and "The Fugitive".

Source: io9 »

- Garth Franklin

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Legendary TV Producer Glen A. Larson Dead At 77

16 November 2014 8:57 PM, PST | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

The iconic television writer, creator, and producer Glen A. Larson passed away Friday, November 14, at the age of 77.

Larson was perhaps best known for creating some of the most iconic TV shows of the 1970s and '80s including Alias Smith and Jones, McCloud, Buck Rogers In The 25th Century, B.J. And The Bear, Trauma Center, Quincy M.E., Manimal, The Fall Guy, and Magnum P.I..

However, two of Larson's most lasting creations are still cultural touchstones to this day. In 1982, Larson introduced Kitt, the artificially intelligent car, and David Hasselhoff's Michael Knight to American audiences with Knight Rider, and it quickly became one of the biggest TV hits of its day.

Photos: Stars We've Lost In Recent Years

Four years prior, Larson created a show that would, much later, become a hugely celebrated franchise. In 1978, Larson brought the cult classic sci-fi series Battlestar Galactica to TVs across the country.

While not a huge »

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Glen A. Larson: 8 Outlandish Projects From the Creator of ‘Knight Rider,’ ‘Battlestar Galactica’

16 November 2014 6:00 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

In his prime, Glen A. Larson could have sold a pilot for ice to the Eskimo Network.

The prolific producer, who died Friday at the age of 77, was not afraid of stretching the limits of physics and credulity in the pursuit of a hit series. He gave us K.I.T.T., the talking supercomputer car of “Knight Rider.” He gave us Steve Austin, the astronaut whose creaky atomic-powered implants gave him superhuman strength. He put Lorne Greene in a track suit and cape to lead “Battlestar Galactica.” And he sicced a mild-mannered Nyu professor who turns into fierce animals on NBC with “Manimal.”

But even with a track record of success that also included “Quincy,” “Magnum, P.I.,” “The Fall Guy” and, yes, “B.J. and the Bear,” Larson had plenty of ones that got away. Culled from the pages of Variety, here’s a look at a few Larson pilots »

- Cynthia Littleton

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'Battlestar Galactica' Creator Glen A. Larson Passes Away at 77

15 November 2014 1:38 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

One of the leading voices in 70s and 80s television has passed away. Glen A. Larson died Friday night at the age of 77 at a California hospital. He succumbed to esophageal cancer.

Glen A. Larson is known as one of television's seminal storytellers. He is responsible for creating over a dozen hit TV series. The highlights in his career include Battlestar Galactica, Knight Rider, Magnum P.I., Manimal, Quincy M.E., Buck Rogers in the 25th Century and Cover Up.

Glen A. Larson got his start in show business during the 1950s, serving as a member of The Four Preps musical group. A decade later, he began his writing career, which started with an episode of The Fugitive.

He won a trio of Emmys starting in 1974 and 1975 for McCloud, which took home trophies for Outstanding Limited Series. And then he won again in 1977 for Quincy M.E., which took home the award for Outstanding Drama Series. »

- MovieWeb

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'Magnum P.I.' Creator Dead -- Glen A. Larson Dies From Cancer at 77

15 November 2014 12:25 PM, PST | TMZ | See recent TMZ news »

Glen A. Larson -- who created the hit shows "Magnum P.I.", "Knight Rider" and "Quincy M.E." -- has died from esophageal cancer at the age of 77.The incredibly successful writer died Friday night at UCLA Medical Center ... according to his son James.Larson was one of the most prolific producers of the '70s and '80s ... creating a string of iconic hit shows -- including "Battlestar Galactica," "The Fall Guy," "B.J. and the Bear, »

- TMZ Staff

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Battlestar Galactica, Magnum P.I. Creator Glen A. Larson Dies at 77

15 November 2014 12:10 PM, PST | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Children of the ’70s and ’80s have lost one of their seminal storytellers.

Emmy nominee Glen A. Larson, who created dozens of hit series including Battlestar Galactica, Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, Quincy M.E., Cover Up, Magnum, P.I., Manimal, The Fall Guy and Knight Rider, died Friday night at age 77 at a California hospital. The cause of death was esophageal cancer.

Larson, who began his show-biz career in the 1950s as a member of The Four Preps singing group, transitioned to TV writing a decade later with an episode of The Fugitive.

His trio of Emmy nominations came »

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Bill Cosby stops speaking when NPR asked about rape allegations

15 November 2014 11:49 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Bill Cosby stops speaking when NPR asked about rape allegations When “Weekend Edition’s” Scott Simon brought up the allegations in an interview taped last week but aired this morning, he was met with silence. "This question gives me no pleasure, Mr. Cosby, but there have been serious allegations raised about you in recent days,” Simon asked. To which, according to Simon, Cosby responded by shaking his head no. Glen A. Larson dies -- creator of “Knight Rider,” “Battlestar Galactica,” “Magnum P.I." Larson, 77, also created “The Fall Guy” and “Quincy M.E.” Larson died Friday night of esophageal cancer at UCLA Medical Center. A script for a very important “American Horror Story: Freak Show” scene was stolen According to TMZ, the one-page script has been shopped around to various media outlets. “The Wire’s” David Simon loved this “Comeback” clip “so hard” Watch Valerie Cherish react to seeing a poster for »

- Norman Weiss

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‘Battlestar Galactica’ Creator Glen A. Larson Dies at 77

15 November 2014 10:43 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Legendary TV creator Glen A. Larson, the writer-producer behind “Battlestar Galactica,” “Magnum, P.I.,” “Knight Rider” and “Quincy M.E.” died on Friday, the Los Angeles Times reports. He was 77.

His son James told the Lat that Larson passed away of complications from esophageal cancer Friday night at UCLA Medical Center.

Larson had a string of TV hits in the 1970s and 80s, and dozens of writing and producing credits to his name. He created his first show, “Alias Smith and Jones,” in 1971, but left the ABC Western right after star Peter Duel committed suicide.

Larson also co-conceived “Quincy M.E.” with Lou Shaw. The NBC forensic drama starring Jack Klugman had an impressive eight-season run from 1976-83.

He created “Battlestar Galactica” a few years later. Although the series only lasted a single season (ABC cut the cord in 1979 after two dozen episodes partly because of its hefty production cost), it spawned a series of spinoffs. »

- Maane Khatchatourian

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'Battlestar Galactica' Creator Glen A. Larson Dead at 77

15 November 2014 10:21 AM, PST | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Glen A. Larson, the television writer-producer who created Battlestar Galactica, among many other hits series, died on Friday at the age of 77. Larson's son told The Hollywood Reporter that he died of esophageal cancer at UCLA Medical Center.

Larson's incredibly fruitful television career came after a stint in the 1950s pop group the Four Preps. After working as a story editor and producer on It Takes a Thief, he created his first show with the western Alias Smith and Jones, followed by The Six Million Dollar Man. In 1976, Larson introduced Quincy, »

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Glen A. Larson, Creator of TV’s 'Quincy M.E.,' 'Magnum, P.I.' and 'Battlestar Galactica,' Dies at 77

13 November 2014 2:49 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Glen A. Larson, the wildly successful television writer-producer whose enviable track record includes Quincy M.E., Magnum, P.I., Battlestar Galactica, Knight Rider and The Fall Guy, has died. He was 77. Larson, a singer in the 1950s clean-cut pop group The Four Preps who went on to compose many of the theme songs for his TV shows, died Friday night of esophageal cancer at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica, his son, James, told The Hollywood Reporter. Larson also wrote and produced for such noteworthy series as ABC’s It Takes a Thief, starring his fellow Hollywood High

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- Mike Barnes

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Big E's “Bad” Movies That Hurt So Good: “Curse Of The Black Widow” (1977, TV Movie)

9 November 2014 10:44 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

“If a movie makes you happy, for whatever reason, then it’s a good movie.”

—Big E

*******Warning: Review Contains Spoilers*******

By Ernie Magnotta  

If there’s one thing I love, it’s 1970s made-for-tv horror films. I remember sitting in front of the television as a kid and watching a plethora of films such as Gargoyles, Bad Ronald, Satan’s School for Girls, Horror at 37,000 Feet, Devil Dog: Hound of Hell, Scream Pretty Peggy, Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark, Moon of the Wolf and The Initiation of Sarah just to name a few. Some of those are better than others, but all were fun.

When I think back, there have been some legendary names associated with small screen horrors. Genre masters John Carpenter (Halloween), Steven Spielberg (Jaws), Wes Craven (Nightmare on Elm Street), Tobe Hooper (Texas Chainsaw Massacre) and Joseph Stefano (Psycho) all took shots at television »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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September 30th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Leprechaun, Killer Fish

29 September 2014 6:02 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

For the final week of September, we’ll be seeing a handful of indie genre titles coming our way to DVD and Blu-ray, as well as several cult classics, including the original Leprechaun films, finally making their high-def debut on Tuesday.

In terms of new indie movies to keep an eye out for, Grow-up Tony Phillips, the latest from up-and-coming Austin filmmaker Emily Hagins (My Sucky Teen Romance), is being released as well as American Muscle, The Paranormal Diaries, Grave Halloween and the pregnancy-themed horror flick Delivery: The Beast Within. For those of you horror fans looking for something a bit more ‘seasoned’, both Krull and Killer Fish are getting their Blu-ray treatment this week and should make for excellent additions to your home entertainment collection.

Spotlight Titles:

Grow-up Tony Phillips (Anderson Digital, DVD)

Who doesn’t love Halloween? All of Tony Phillips’ high school friends do, apparently. It’s »

- Heather Wixson

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R.I.P. Actor Richard Kiel — James Bond Villain & ‘Twilight Zone’ Kanamit

10 September 2014 6:28 PM, PDT | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

The towering actor who played the mercenary assassin Jaws in a pair of Roger Moore-era 007 movies and the enigmatic alien in one of the most famous episodes of The Twilight Zone died today. Richard Kiel would have turned 75 on Saturday. His agent of 35 years, Steven Stevens Sr, told Deadline that Kiel died this afternoon at St. Agnes Medical Center in Fresno, CA. The 7-foot-2 actor with the crooked smile got his start in early-1060s TV, appearing in such series as Laramie, Thriller and The Rifleman. He appeared in the 1962 sci-fi feature The Phantom Planet before landing the chilling Twilight Zone role. In “To Serve Man,” he played a representative of an advanced, giant alien race called the Kanamits, who alight on Earth amid what seems to be peace and good will. Kiel delivers a mysterious encrypted book to a meeting of the United Nations, and the episode soars from there. »

- Erik Pedersen

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Bold TV Detective Portraits Are on the Case

30 August 2014 8:00 AM, PDT | GeekTyrant | See recent GeekTyrant news »

I don’t know if your dad was super into detective shows, but mine was. Is. Also, he was a teacher, so all summer if I wanted to watch TV it was reruns of Mike Hammer. I honestly cried tears of joy when he discovered Homocide, because at least that was good. (Mike Hammer was so bad that my dad actually denies having ever watched it, but I was there. I remember it all too well.) Now that I’m a grown-ass woman with her own TV (and various other show-watching devices) I’m a little nostalgic for the many, many hours of my childhood spent watching every detective show that ever aired. Which is why I love this art series so so much.

Olivier Fritsch Gomez made these simple, fun illustrations of TV detectives, and they are pretty great. My favorite is Colombo, because the posing is so perfect. »

- Mily Dunbar

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Ed Nelson, ‘Peyton Place’ Star, Character Actor, Dies at 85

12 August 2014 4:41 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Ed Nelson, a star of the 1960s primetime soap “Peyton Place” and an actor with almost 200 credits, mostly in television, died on Saturday in Greensboro, N.C. He was 85.

Nelson had most recently appeared in the 2003 courtroom thriller “Runaway Jury,” starring Gene Hackman. He had a more significant role as General Sherman in the 1998 Jackie Chan vehicle “Who Am I.”

On “Peyton Place,” he played Dr. Michael Rossi during the entire five-year run of the series — 436 episodes. He returned in 1985 for reunion telepic “Peyton Place: The Next Generation.”

But Nelson was already a TV veteran by the time he was cast on “Peyton Place” in 1964. After a string of small parts in Roger Corman B movies during the mid to late ’50s, he began guesting on Westerns such as “Zane Grey Theater,” “Have Gun — Will Travel,” “The Rifleman,” “Maverick,” “Rawhide” and “Gunsmoke” plus other series such as “Twilight Zone,” “The Untouchables, »

- Carmel Dagan

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Will Ferrell and Adam McKay Bringing All-Time Worst TV Show Manimal to the Big Screen

22 July 2014 7:56 PM, PDT | DreadCentral.com | See recent Dread Central news »

It only ran on NBC for 8 episodes back in 1983. Its legacy is that of one of the worst television shows of all time, a title spoken about only as a punchline. Now Anchorman creators Will Ferrell and Adam McKay will bring “Manimal” to the big screen. We truly live in strange times.

Original Synopsis:

Dr Jonathan Chase... wealthy, young, handsome. A man with the brightest of futures. A man with the darkest of pasts.

From Africa's deepest recesses to the rarefied peaks of Tibet, heir to his father's legacy and the world's darkest mysteries. Jonathan Chase, master of the secrets that divide man from animal, animal from man... Manimal!

Manimal” is one of those TV show ideas that probably sounded good on paper. A dashing, aristocratic British adventurer raised in Africa (played by Simon MacCorkindale, "Falcon Crest") gains the power to transform into any animal of his choosing (though for »

- Foywonder

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HBO Orders Tim Robbins And Jack Black To The Brink

12 February 2014 4:15 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Having commissioned the pilot episode of The Brink – a half-hour dark political comedy – last year, HBO has now ordered the show to series, with Tim Robbins and Jack Black heading the cast.

The show centres around the main players caught in a geo-political crisis. Tim Robbins plays the Us Secretary of State, Walter Hollander, who has little patience for war-mongers, while Jack Black plays Alex Coppins – a Foreign Service Officer dealing with the crisis in the field. A third main role – that of a Navy fighter pilot – has yet to be cast, although the wider cast list includes Aasif Mandvi and Meera Syal. The pilot was written by brothers Roberto and Kim Benabib – Roberto having previously worked on Ally McBeal and Weeds. Both will also serve as executive producers, alongside stars Black and Robbins, Jerry Weintraub (Behind The Candelabra) and Jay Roach (The Austin Powers franchise, The Campaign), who also directed the pilot. »

- Sarah Myles

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003 | 2001

18 items from 2014


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