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Jane Seymour Reveals Sexual Harassment As Young Actress

As allegations of sexual harassment and assault by powerful entertainment industry figures continue to balloon, Jane Seymour has recounted her own experience as a young actress in Hollywood, an incident that stopped her from working for an entire year. In an interview with Sky News’ Sunrise morning show and reported by The Daily Mail, the British actress known for her roles in Live and Let Die, Somewhere in Time and TV’s Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman recalled an incident with…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Jane Seymour Reveals Sexual Harassment As Young Actress

  • Deadline
Jane Seymour Reveals Sexual Harassment As Young Actress
As allegations of sexual harassment and assault by powerful entertainment industry figures continue to balloon, Jane Seymour has recounted her own experience as a young actress in Hollywood, an incident that stopped her from working for an entire year. In an interview with Sky News’ Sunrise morning show and reported by The Daily Mail, the British actress known for her roles in Live and Let Die, Somewhere in Time and TV’s Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman recalled an incident with…
See full article at Deadline »

Portrait of Jennie

David O. Selznick’s marvelous romantic fantasy ode to Jennifer Jones was almost wholly unappreciated back in 1948. It’s one of those peculiar pictures that either melts one’s heart or doesn’t. Backed by a music score adapted from Debussy, just one breathy “Oh Eben . . . “ will turn average romantics into mush.

Portrait of Jennie

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1948 / B&W w/ Color Insert / 1:37 flat Academy / 86 min. / Street Date October 24, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Jennifer Jones, Joseph Cotten, Ethel Barrymore, Lillian Gish, Cecil Kellaway, David Wayne, Albert Sharpe.

Cinematography: Joseph H. August

Production Designers: J. MacMillan Johnson, Joseph B. Platt

Original Music: Dimitri Tiomkin, also adapting themes from Claude Debussy; Bernard Herrmann

Written by Leonardo Bercovici, Peter Berneis, Paul Osborn, from the novella by Robert Nathan

Produced by David O. Selznick

Directed by William Dieterle

Once upon a time David O. Selznick’s Portrait of Jennie was an
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Random Roles: Jane Seymour on how Dr. Quinn was not supposed to last and her “whole new career” in comedy

  • The AV Club
Welcome to Random Roles, wherein we talk to actors about the characters who defined their careers. The catch: They don’t know beforehand what roles we’ll ask them to talk about.

The actor: Since making her film debut in 1969, Jane Seymour has experienced a number of career renaissances and repeatedly managed to reinvent herself as an actor, something that happens all too infrequently in Hollywood. While you can attribute part of her success to her ability to bounce between high drama and lowbrow comedy seemingly without blinking an eye, it’s just as likely because she doesn’t like to lose. With a filmography that includes spies (Live And Let Die), Cylons (Battlestar Galactica), century-spanning romance (Somewhere In Time), frat-boy comedy (Wedding Crashers), and life in a frontier town (Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman), Seymour keeps audiences guessing as to where she’s going to turn up next. Currently ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Film Review: ‘Duckweed’

The biggest surprise about “Duckweed,” the sophomore feature written and directed by China’s superstar writer-blogger Han Han, is its absolute predictability. A dramedy in which a car racer time-travels to the late ’90s and becomes his estranged father’s partner-in-crime, the film features plot turns and emotional arcs that are all easy to anticipate. What the movie does reflect is how China is moving ahead so fast that millennials are already glancing at the not-so-distant past and its values with jaded amusement and nostalgia. More relaxed and carefree than any of the Lunar New Year blockbusters jostling for the holiday crowd, the film is sprinkled with witty grace notes and is crowd-pleasing without being too ingratiating or idiotic.

Those who admire Han’s pithy prose or the sublime poetry of his debut feature “The Continent” may feel he’s punching below his weight here, but the absence of intellectual
See full article at Variety - Film News »

On this Day in history as it relates to the movies...

Happy Memorial Day my peoples. Let's have another history lesson via showbiz

On this day in history as it relates to the movies...

1431 Joan of Arc is burned at the stake. If you've never seen The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928), one of the best movies of all time containing hugely powerful actressing by Falconetti you must repent. Save your soul and watch it.

1536 King Henry VIII, whose wives all tended to die prematurely (funny how that happens) marries Jane Seymour (not to be confused with the Dr Quinn Medicine Woman & Somewhere in Time actress). 477 years later Oscar Isaac sings about Queen Jane's tragic life in Inside Llewyn Davis's very best scene. 

1896 Howard Hawks is born. Makes so many great films but my favorites are: Bringing Up Baby (1938), Red River (1948) and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) 

Inside Llewyn Davis (2013): The Death Of Queen Jane (The Movie Title Song) from dky6dcnQbL dky6dcnQbL on Vimeo.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Jane Seymour To Appear At "Somewhere In Time" 35Th Anniversary Screening, December 15, L.A.

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Jeannot Szwarc’s 1980 film Somewhere in Time, which stars Christopher Reeve, Jane Seymour, and Christopher Plummer, will be screened at the The Royale Laemmle Theater in Los Angeles. Based upon the novel by Richard Matheson (who also wrote the screenplay), the 103-minute film will be screened on Tuesday, December 15h, 2015 at 7:30 pm.

Actress Jane Seymour, who played Elise McKenna in the film, is scheduled to appear in-person along with director Jeannot Szwarc, to discuss the film and answer audience questions following the screening.

From the press release:

A 35th Anniversary Screening of Somewhere In Time (1980)

Tuesday, December 15, at 7:30 Pm at the Royal Theatre

Jane Seymour and the late Christopher Reeve star in Jeannot Szwarc’s heady romantic drama about a contemporary playwright who becomes obsessed with a 1912 photograph of a beautiful stage actress and finds a way to travel back in time to meet her.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Iron Maiden’s latest music video pays tribute to classic video games

Iron Maiden takes us on a heavy metal trip through the history of classic video games.

The legendary British heavy metal band are getting ready to release their first single in five years and in order to promote their new song, they’ve put together an awesome video game-inspired music video to mark the occasion. Titled “Speed of Light,” the video features Iron Maiden’s zombie mascot Eddie traveling through cyberspace and getting sucked into an arcade machine which then forces him to play through four different gaming genres.

First up is a 2D platformer reminiscent of the arcade classic Donkey Kong (and inspired by the cover artwork for Iron Maiden’s album Killers), in which Eddie has to hack his way through some enemies with a hatchet in order to rescue a red leather-clad damsel-in-distress from the grasp of a hulking brute. Next Eddie travels to the 16 bit era
See full article at SoundOnSight »

If These Menus Could Talk: The History of L.A. Power Dining Revealed

This story first appeared in the July 31 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe. The first time chef Roy Choi visited the Los Angeles Public Library's 9,000-item vintage menu collection, he felt like Christopher Reeve's character in the 1980 movie Somewhere in Time, a playwright who travels back decades. "I started to feel the history, but not from an intellectual standpoint — from a visceral one," writes Choi. That visit led to a collaboration with USC professor Josh Kun on "To Live and Dine in L.A.," a Central

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘The Age Of Adaline’ Review: Blake Lively’s Love Story For The Ages

  • Deadline
‘The Age Of Adaline’ Review: Blake Lively’s Love Story For The Ages
Avengers fans don’t kill me, but if I had my choice between Age Of Ultron and The Age Of Adaline, a splendid new romantic drama opening Friday, I just might choose Adaline. Guess I am just a romantic at heart but as I say in my video review above, this magical, quirkily original and beautifully acted love story is irresistible. It’s almost like an elongated Twilight Zone episode merged with Somewhere In Time but at its core, it has its own beating heart. It’s one of those…
See full article at Deadline »

Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Oscar Winner Went All the Way from Wyler to Coppola in Film Career Spanning Half a Century

Teresa Wright and Matt Damon in 'The Rainmaker' Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright vs. Samuel Goldwyn: Nasty Falling Out.") "I'd rather have luck than brains!" Teresa Wright was quoted as saying in the early 1950s. That's understandable, considering her post-Samuel Goldwyn choice of movie roles, some of which may have seemed promising on paper.[1] Wright was Marlon Brando's first Hollywood leading lady, but that didn't help her to bounce back following the very public spat with her former boss. After all, The Men was released before Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire turned Brando into a major international star. Chances are that good film offers were scarce. After Wright's brief 1950 comeback, for the third time in less than a decade she would be gone from the big screen for more than a year.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Dave Holmes Is Writing a Book

  • Vulture
Dave Holmes Is Writing a Book
Here's some exciting news from one of Vulture's own: Dave Holmes, TV personality and our “Somewhere in Time” columnist, has signed a deal to write a comic memoir. Set to publish in the spring of 2016, the book is tentatively titled Party of One. Read the full synopsis below. Mazel tov, Dave! Charting Holmes’ painfully hilarious trip through a life lived on the outside, desperately trying to get in — from his youth as the artsy kid in a sportsy family to his time as a closeted gay kid in a conservative Catholic school, through his experience losing the first “Wanna Be A VJ” contest on live television and subsequent career as a big fat grown man at MTV in the eye of the teen pop hurricane, up to his life as a man in his 40s who has finally learned to accept himself, simply because he’s tried everything else — Party
See full article at Vulture »

Reeve Receives Standing Ovation at Oscar Ceremony (Video)

Christopher Reeve Foundation for spinal cord and stem cell research (photo: Darryl Hannah and Christopher Reeve in 'Rear Window') (See previous post: "'Superman' Christopher Reeve and his Movies: Ten-Year Death Anniversary.") In his 1998 autobiography Still Me, Christopher Reeve recalled: "At an especially bleak moment [prior to an operation that might result in his death], the door [of his hospital room] flew open and in hurried a squat fellow with a blue scrub hat and a yellow surgical gown and glasses, speaking in a Russian accent. For the first time since the accident, I laughed. My old friend had helped me know that somehow I was going to be okay." The "old friend" was the recently deceased Robin Williams, whom Reeve had befriended while both were studying at Juillard. Eventually, Reeve became a staunch advocate for spinal cord and stem cell research, sponsoring with his wife the Christopher Reeve Foundation — later renamed the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation (and formerly known
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Remembering Superman Reeve Ten Years After His Death

Christopher Reeve: 'Superman' and his movies (photo: Christopher Reeve in 'Superman' 1978) Christopher Reeve, Superman in four movies from 1978 to 1987, died ten years ago today. In 1995, while taking part in a cross-country horse race in Culpeper, Virginia, Reeve was thrown off his horse, hitting his head on the top rail of a jump; the near-fatal accident left him paralyzed from the neck down. He ultimately succumbed to heart failure at age 52 on October 10, 2004. Long before he was cast as Superman aka Clark Kent, the Manhattan-born (as Christopher D'Olier Reeve on September 25, 1952), Cornell University and Juillard School for Drama alumnus was an ambitious young actor whose theatrical apprenticeship included, while still a teenager, some time as an observer at London's Old Vic and Paris' Comédie Française. At age 23, he landed his first Broadway role in a production of Enid Bagnold's A Matter of Gravity, starring Katharine Hepburn.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

The Least Successful Tracks on 21 More Now That’s What I Call Music! Albums

  • Vulture
The Least Successful Tracks on 21 More Now That’s What I Call Music! Albums
In my previous installment of Somewhere in Time, we took a look at the least-successful songs on each of the first 20 installments of the popular Now That’s What I Call Music! series. Regardless of where the songs charted (hint: not high), there were still some keepers in round one, and also many, many skippers. As producers behind the compilation series likely know, predicting hits can’t be easy, especially in our ever more rapidly evolving pop-culture landscape; as we move into the next 20 Twicm! albums, we see the franchise trying to put a finger on where rock is going, which rappers will be relevant, and which teen idols’ pictures will line the lockers of young American girls and bi-curious boys. Sometimes the song selections are right on the money! But as each of the following entries prove, sometimes they are not. Incidentally, I’m only going up to Now!
See full article at Vulture »

The Least Essential Tracks From 20 Now That’s What I Call Music! Albums

  • Vulture
The Least Essential Tracks From 20 Now That’s What I Call Music! Albums
Since 1998, Epic has been pumping out the Now That’s What I Call Music! compilations of the biggest pop hits of the moment … and at least one song you skip past and immediately forget. Forecasting pop hits is hard, so it makes sense that there would always be one non-hit, a second single from what turned out to be a one-hit wonder, a comeback that failed to come together, a Next Big Thing That Didn’t Pan Out. Pop history is written by the winners, but this week’s installment of Somewhere in Time will be all about the losers. So let’s hop in my DeLorean Gif as I revisit each installment in the Now! series and pick out the least significant track on each one. We may unearth a pleasant, faded memory! Or we may spend some time with Aaron Carter. Time will tell. 1. Imajin, “Shorty (You Keep
See full article at Vulture »

25 Hugely Popular Soundtracks That Somehow Never Hit No. 1

  • Vulture
25 Hugely Popular Soundtracks That Somehow Never Hit No. 1
Last week, I put some miles on my DeLorean Gif, traveling through the last 30 years checking out the soundtracks to hit No. 1 since the reign of Purple Rain. It got you guys talking! It got me Spotifying! So, for this week’s installment of Somewhere in Time, I’m following it up with a look at 25 other significant, hit-spawning soundtracks from the past 30 years that, for one reason or another, failed to make it to the top of the charts, even though it seemed like you and everyone you know listened to them all the time. (I’m also including, way at the end, two soundtracks that did hit number one but that I failed to include last time because I’m only human, guys.) We begin on a chilly Chicagoland Saturday morning in 1985 …The Breakfast Club (1985) Synopsis: Troubled kids smoke pot in detention, somehow avoid panic attacks. Monster hit:
See full article at Vulture »

‘Soulmate’ DVD Review

Stars: Anna Walton, Tom Wisdom, Tanya Myers, Nick Brimble, Emma Cleasby | Written and Directed by Axelle Carolyn

[Note: This review is of the full Uncut version of Soulmate shown at last years Frightfest Halloween All-Nighter, which is not the version being released on DVD. The BBFC requested cuts to the opening suicide scene due to "imitable technique" and so director Axelle Carolyn excised the entire scene from the home entertainment release - hopefully that scene will be made available online at some point]

Actress Axelle Carolyn first turned her hand to directing with the well-received short The Last Post in 2011, she followed it up with the short The Halloween Kid, which screened as part of the International Short Film Showcase at Film4 Frightfest in August 2012. Soulmate, her feature directorial debut, stars Anna Walton (who previously worked with Carolyn on The Halloween Kid and will be a familiar face in to genre fans, having appeared in Hellboy 2 in 2008 and The Seasoning House in 2012) and sees a woman, Audrey, retreat to a remote country cottage after attempting to commit suicide due to the sudden death of her husband. But once settled in she soon discovers her safe haven is haunted by its previous owner, and this spirit has some startling links to the nearby local community, especially the strange Zellaby family.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

It Is Absolutely Time to Reexamine Last Week’s Top 40 Singles Chart

  • Vulture
It Is Absolutely Time to Reexamine Last Week’s Top 40 Singles Chart
It’s mid-summer, it’s very hot, and we need to conserve fuel. So for this installment of Somewhere in Time, I’m taking my Delorean Gif back exactly seven days, to the glorious week of July 14, 2014. What strange customs and trends will we encounter there? Slip into your colorful Bonobos pants and let’s find out, shall we?40. Lil Wayne/Drake, “Believe Me” Last week’s Top 40 kicks off with two of the biggest names in 2014 hip-hop, collaborating on a track that is structurally identical to “Top That” from the 1989 film Teen Witch. 39. Luke Bryan, “Play It Again” As mainstream hip-hop gets duller and rock gets more fragmented and less fun, country swooped in and became the arena music of the 21st century, and it did so by stealing the swagger of the former and restoring the joy of the latter. Country guys have the posture of Mama Said
See full article at Vulture »
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