7.3/10
45
5 user

The Sky Is Gray (1980)

| Drama | TV Movie
A young boy named James comes of age in 1940s Louisiana and grapples with what it means to be black during a time of racism and poverty. James's mother accompanies her son to town to see ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Octavia
James Bond III ...
James
...
Rosemary
...
Monsieur Bayonne
Chez Lister ...
Ty
...
Helena
...
Student
...
Preacber
Roberta Jean Williams ...
Young Lady
Hilda Haynes ...
Woman
Lynn Arden ...
Nurse
Reuben Collins ...
Pimp
...
John Lee's Mother
Kenny Johnson ...
John Lee Williams
...
Ernest
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Storyline

A young boy named James comes of age in 1940s Louisiana and grapples with what it means to be black during a time of racism and poverty. James's mother accompanies her son to town to see about the boy's nagging toothache, and his journey soon becomes an eye-opening odyssey. Written by alfiehitchie

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Drama

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An outstanding film
27 October 2008 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This is actually an excellent film version of a great short story by Ernest Gaines. The performance by Olivia Cole is quite remarkable--and it does give a very complex and layered view of race in the South during World War II. It is true that nothing blows up and Adam Sandler is not in it. But it is wonderfully written by a great African American playwright, Charles Fuller, and it has a very good small performance by Cleavon Little...before Blazing Saddles. Unfortunately there are too few films that deal with the life of African Americans in any kind of serious way, and this one presents real characters whose lives are difficult and complicated by race and poverty, but who maintain their integrity. It also gets away from the all too familiar plot lines that dominate so many films that deal with race in the South in this period, and instead just lets the characters speak for themselves-- rather than as political constructs.


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