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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2002

1-20 of 170 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


As Stephen King Turns 70, King of Horror’s Neighbors Describe His Everyday Life

21 September 2017 1:32 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Today marks the 70th birthday of the King of Horror, Stephen King. And while many people think of him as the author of “It,” “The Shining,” and other nightmare fuel, the good people of Bangor, Maine also know him as a great neighbor. King is the rare international celebrity who still lives and goes about his life in a relatively small town. (Bangor proper has just over 30,000 people.) His local paper, the Bangor Daily News, celebrated his birthday by sharing tales from people who have seen him out to dinner, let him coach their kids… and, in one case, told him. »

- Jeremy Fuster

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Crown the Clown: It to Become Highest Grossing Horror Movie Ever

20 September 2017 12:22 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

It is scaring up some record breaking numbers.

The new Stephen King adaptation is on pace to become the highest-grossing horror flick of all time by Thursday, at which point it will have floated past the current record holder, 1973’s The Exorcist (which has a $232.9 million lifetime domestic gross), according to Deadline.

Warner Bros., the studio that produced the film, is claiming the record based solely on genre, excluding other films like The Sixth Sense, Jaws and I Am Legend — which all made more money — by citing them has “hybrid” genres, rather than pure horror, the outlet reports.

By Sunday, »

- Mike Miller

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10 Best Stephen King Movies So Far

19 September 2017 2:25 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

It stormed the box office in September 2017, smashing box office records, pleasing critics, and quickly washing away the bad taste of so many poorly wrought Stephen King adaptations like the current of a suburban neighborhood sewer. Move over Ernest Hemmingway! Beat it Dr. Seuss! The Stephen King adaptation is a hot commodity in Hollywood once again.

Sure, those aforementioned authors have had their books adapted less than half as many times as the works of Stephen King. With so many adapted works from the same prolific storyteller, many of them are sure to be bad. And that is the case with Stephen King. If you grew up in the 80s, you might even remember that a Stephen King movie was not anticipated with the kind of must-see attitude of today's audiences. Many laughed off the notion, believing that if it was a Stephen King movie, it must be bad.

But as It reminded audiences, »

- MovieWeb

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What We Know About Hulu’s ‘Castle Rock’ Thus Far!

13 September 2017 2:05 PM, PDT | Age of the Nerd | See recent Age of the Nerd news »

(Aotn) It has already been quite a year for Stephen King fans with the theatrical releases of both “The Dark Tower” and “It” and now we can anticipate the upcoming Hulu limited series “Castle Rock”. “Castle Rock” will be a psychological-horror series set in the Stephen King multiverse, it will combine the mythological scale and intimate character storytelling of King’s best-loved works, weaving an epic saga of darkness and light, played out on a few square miles of Maine woodland.

Hulu has committed to a 10-episode first season and the project was developed for television by Sam Shaw and Dustin Thomason, who serve as executive producers, along with J.J. Abrams, Ben Stephenson and Liz Glotzer. “Castle Rock” is from Bad Robot Productions in association with Warner Bros. Television and it is sure to be epic.

The casting news alone has us even more excited! Bill Skarsgard (It, Atomic Blonde, »

- Kristyn Clarke

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It Nearly Featured Appearances By Other ’80s Horror Icons

12 September 2017 10:41 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Despite being a lifelong lover of horror, not even I could have foreseen the massive amount of success currently being enjoyed by It. But, then again, I guess living up to all that hype by garnering critical acclaim and having good word of mouth to go along with it certainly helped with achieving an impressive $123 million dollar opening weekend. Seriously, numbers like that are pretty much unheard of for this genre and have breathed new life into a mostly stagnant box office year.

Quite obviously, Pennywise, the film’s chief antagonist, is most notably known to take on the form of a clown, which the marketing was largely centered on. However, it’s also been well established that he’s a shapeshifter able to take on the guise of someone’s specific fears, as was seen in the much lauded remake.

In Stephen King’s original novel, though, Pennywise also »

- Eric Joseph

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Did You Catch This ‘Sleepwalkers’ Easter Egg in ‘It’?

12 September 2017 7:21 AM, PDT | bloody-disgusting.com | See recent Bloody-Disgusting.com news »

Everything is connected in the Stephen King Universe. While this year’s The Dark Tower heavily played up the story’s connection to other King tales, loaded with direct references to everything from Cujo to The Shining, Andy Muschietti’s It didn’t quite take the same approach. But there was at least one fun King Easter egg that […] »

- John Squires

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Report: Daily Dead Tours The Shining and Insidious: Beyond The Further Mazes at Halloween Horror Nights in Hollywood

11 September 2017 5:24 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

If you’ve ever attended Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Studios Hollywood, then you know that John Murdy, Chris Williams, and their entire team have turned haunted attractions into something of an art form over the last 19 years. The lineup for Hhn 2017 is wickedly impressive, with seven mazes, a Terror Tram hosted by Chucky that also features several other horror icons, a handful of intense Scare Zones scattered throughout Universal Studios, and a brand new Jabbawockeez show to boot.

Recently, Daily Dead had the opportunity to tour two of the upcoming mazes—The Shining and Insidious: Beyond the Further—that attendees will have a chance to see for themselves when Hhn opens in SoCal on Friday, September 15th, as Murdy took us through all the intricacies that went into bringing these attractions to life for this year’s haunt season.

Murdy’s tour began with taking us inside the latest Insidious maze, »

- Heather Wixson

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Stephen King on ‘It’ Monster Opening: ‘We Blew the Roof Off the Box Office’

11 September 2017 2:06 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

If moviegoers were waiting for a thumbs up from Stephen King before checking out the new big screen adaptation of his novel “It,” he just gave it. “We blew the roof off the box office with It over the weekend. Thanks to all of you who went out to see it,” the King of Horror tweeted. King isn’t always so enthusiastic about his film adaptations — he famously despised Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of “The Shining,” for example. But “It” lived up to his vision. Also Read: 'It' Scores Monster $123 Million in Final Opening Weekend Box Office Tally We blew the roof off. »

- Rosemary Rossi

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How It Connects to Other Stephen King Stories

9 September 2017 2:54 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Most Stephen King fans already know that the man has created a sprawling universe, with many of his most popular stories interconnected. He has his own shared universe, which is only now starting to be explored on the big screen. The latest adaptation of his work It hit theaters this weekend and is proving to be a blockbuster. It contains plenty of Easter eggs. Perhaps not as many as this past summer's Dark Tower movie, which featured it's own It shoutout. But you might be surprised how It connects to a lot of King's past novels.

Entertainment Weekly has a pretty comprehensive break down of all the Easter eggs and connections It contains to other Stephen King works of fiction. The book was originally released in 1986, and then turned into a two-part miniseries in the 90s. Characters and places from It have been known to pop up a lot in his work. »

- MovieWeb

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‘It’ Review #2

9 September 2017 10:16 AM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Stars: Bill Skarsgard, Jaeden Lieberher, Finn Wolfhard, Sophia Lillis, Chosen Jacobs, Jack Dylan Grazer, Wyatt Oleff, Nicholas Hamilton, Jake Sim, Logan Thompson, Owen Teague, Jackson Robert Scott, Stephen Bogaert, Stuart Hughes | Written by Chase Palmer, Cary Fukunaga, Gary Dauberman | Directed by Andy Muschetti

Stephen King’s bumper 1986 novel gets the fully-fledged cinematic treatment courtesy of Mama director Andy Muschietti, and screenwriters Chase Palmer, Cary Fukunaga and Gary Dauberman. It’s a rollicking ghost train of a teen horror; an overflowing toy box of shocker setpieces, jolting jump scares and pop culture allusions.

In keeping with the original story’s dual-timeline structure, this adaptation has relocated the childhood part of the story from the 1950s to the 1980s. (One could argue that the ‘80s has – in the quality of its idyllic nostalgia – now almost become the new ‘50s).

Understandably, Muschietti’s film will be regarded as a remake, given that its »

- Rupert Harvey

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Fyi: The It Remake Isn't Bad Just Because It Didn't Scare You

8 September 2017 2:40 PM, PDT | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

The hotly anticipated It sequel has finally arrived, marking a pretty exciting occasion for Stephen King fans and general horror fans alike. After all, It is one of King's more successful and well-known novels, and the disappointing 1990 adaptation surely didn't do the story justice. In the months leading up to its release, the new iteration showed a lot of promise; the trailer is reasonably scary, and the new Pennywise, played by Bill Skarsgard, is evil enough to make children cry. As audiences flock to theaters and reviews roll out, the most pressing debate is clear: is it scary? Before I even address the debate itself, allow me to answer the question. Obviously, you're going to find It scary if you suffer from coulrophobia or if you're just a horror wimp in general. I will say, though, that I thought it would be scarier. As someone who f*cking loves horror movies, »

- Ryan Roschke

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Review: Muschietti's 'It' Effortlessly Blends Horror, Humor, and Heart

7 September 2017 2:46 PM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

Inspired by Richard Matheson, Ray Bradbury, H.P. Lovecraft, and EC Comics' Tales from the Crypt and The Vault of Horror, Stephen King carved a path for himself as the world's foremost writer of horror fiction throughout the '70s and '80s. By the time his novel It was published in 1986, many of King's best-selling books had already been adapted into successful films, including Carrie, The Shining, Cujo, The Dead Zone, and Christine. With the ambitious It, however, King's work shifted shape, much like the novel's titular evil entity haunting a small town in Maine. Instead of writing about the one thing that scared you, like a rabid dog or a demonic car, this time he was writing about everything that did - the very nature of fear itself. Upon its release, King called the novel, "the summation of everything I have learned and done in my whole life to this point. »

- Adam Frazier

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Review: It (2017) Perfectly Captures the Horror, Humor, and Heart of Stephen King’s Iconic Novel

5 September 2017 11:02 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

When he came aboard the latest adaptation of Stephen King’s acclaimed story of seven kids who band together to destroy an evil force that has taken over their small town, director Andy Muschietti had a Herculean task ahead of him with It. Beyond just the fact that fans’ expectations for this project have been at an all-time high ever since the new movie was announced, there was also a wealth of material to contend with in the book that needed to somehow be distilled into a runtime of a little over two hours, and Muschietti also had to find a group of young actors that could contend with weighty themes far beyond their years as well as a versatile actor that could bring a new iteration of Pennywise to life.

To get all these elements to come together successfully is the very definition of challenging, and yet, somehow Muschietti »

- Heather Wixson

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Every Stephen King Movie, Ranked From Worst to Best

5 September 2017 11:00 PM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

As It hits theaters, we rank every Stephen King film adaptation, from The Shining to Pet Sematary. »

- Will Leitch and Tim Grierson

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The Best and Worst Stephen King Adaptations Ranked

5 September 2017 12:26 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ranking the best and worst Stephen King adaptations, from “Carrie” and “The Shining” to “The Mangler” and “The Mist.”

Related stories'War for the Planet of the Apes' Leads International Box Office, 'It' Scores $371.3 Million WorldwideBox Office: 'Mother!' Crumbles With $7.5 Million, 'It' Repeats No. 1'It' Star Bill Skarsgard Says a 'Disturbing' Flashback Scene Was Cut From the Movie »

- Matthew Chernov

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The Best and Worst Stephen King Adaptations Ranked

5 September 2017 12:26 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Ranking the best and worst Stephen King adaptations, from “Carrie” and “The Shining” to “The Mangler” and “The Mist.” »

- Matthew Chernov

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Close Encounters Of The Third Kind at 40 – an Appreciation

31 August 2017 4:41 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Article by Dane Eric Marti

Sometimes a film will speak directly to a person in an audience:  A preternatural, unearthly tendril of luminous light tapping you on the shoulder, a benevolent yet mysterious voice reminding you of an obligation, or a musical, colorful Dream Message entering your eyes and speaking to your soul with wonder, awe and truth. Like other Art forms, film can do amazing things.

For me, there are definitely a few choice films of overwhelming, pristine power. Yet one cinematic work is not just great, deeply special to me: ‘Close Encounters of the Third Kind.’ Directed by the Wonderkind, Steven Spielberg, directly after his landmark suspense-adventure film, ‘Jaws’.

Now, his new flick, released in 1977, also dealt with the fantastic, with riveting moments of terror… but its endgame was something quite dissimilar.

I think it would take either a first-rate Psychologist or an Exorcist with a lot of »

- Movie Geeks

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Stephen King Talks About The Horror of Pennywise and It

31 August 2017 12:00 PM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

I've often wondered what it must be like for successful authors, like Stephen King, to see their works adapted for TV and film; sometimes it works out great (The Shawshank Redemption, Stand By Me) and sometimes not so much (Dreamcatcher, Maximum Overdrive). King, who's published more than 90 books in his 69 years of life -- nearly all of them optioned by Hollywood -- has certainly had his share of adaptation ups and downs.

It is, however, exceedingly rare for any single novel to be made into both a TV mini-series and also a movie (although that is becoming less unusual these days). King published the horror novel, It, in September 1986, and it's traveled a long, strange road ever since. The book was first adapted as a television mini-series in 1990, starring Tim Curry as the evil Pennywise the Clown, and then was again optioned by Warner Bros. in 2009 for a feature film. »

- David Kozlowski

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New It Sneak Peek Dares You to Face Your Deadliest Fears

30 August 2017 4:27 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Next week, after a whole bunch of hype and a lot of impatiently waiting, It is finally making its way to theaters. Warner Bros. has been cranking up the marketing campaign in order to get as many butts in seats as possible and it is probably going to work. Now, the studio has released a brand new featurette for the upcoming It movie that asks you to face your fears while touring the fictional town of Derry, Maine.

Warner Bros. released the new featurette titled It: Face Your Fears, which features some choice bits of new footage, including some new looks at Bill Skarsgard's Pennywise and some extended looks at scenes that have been featured in the trailers for It. But the real attraction here is the interviews with the young cast that makes up The Loser's Club, as well as director Andres Muschietti and the man himself, Stephen King. »

- MovieWeb

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When Authors Write Movies

30 August 2017 4:45 AM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

A look at 5 movies that you might not have known were written by famous authors. Sometimes they worked out, sometimes they did not.

Writing a movie can be a lot different from writing a book. Unlike a movie script, a novel is freeform. The author can take any style or format they would like to convey their ideas. A script, on the other hand, has to be able to be interpreted by the actors, filmmakers, and the audience. Therefore, it is typically structured in a certain way to help people working on the movie do their job and people watching the movie comprehend what is happening. Furthermore, a major difference between writing novels and movies is that movies are (mostly) restricted to the visual realm. It’s not easy to show audiences what characters are thinking, which severely limits plot and character development techniques. Overall, there are unique challenges to »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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