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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 26 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


DVD Review – Dying of the Light (2014)

2 March 2015 5:40 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Dying of the Light, 2014.

Written and Directed by Paul Schrader.

Starring Nicolas Cage, Anton Yelchin, Irene Jacob, Victor Webster and Alexander Karim.

Synopsis:

Burned out CIA operative Evan Lake (Nicolas Cage) is forced into early retirement due to a degenerative medical diagnosis. Aided by an up and coming field agent Milton Schultz (Anton Yelchin) he uses his limited time to track down an old adversary.

Nicolas Cage. Nicolas Cage screaming. Nicolas Cage screaming Loudly. Again.

Given what has been made of the latest Cage-rage low budget effort in many quarters you could be forgiven for thinking this’ll be on a par with that The Wicker Man remake for overall- albeit hilarious- lameness.

In truth, it’s not quite as bad as all that. It’s just a bit weird really, with Schrader and the cast recently disowning the finished product and claiming something of a studio takeover from the creatives in control. »

- Robert W Monk

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News Nuggets: Oscar Best Picture loss by 'Boyhood' is the 'worst mistake' in 20 years

25 February 2015 4:20 PM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

Dan Kois declares that the rejection of "Boyhood" on Sunday as Oscar's Best Picture was the Academy's "worst mistake in 20 years." He says we witnessed an "epochal travesty" when the Richard Linklater film lost, which only happens when "a true masterpiece, a movie for the ages, somehow battles its way through the mediocrity" to only lose in the end. He calls the eventual winner "Birdman" a "terrific" movie, but that we will look back to say "how did they let this happen?" Other "epochal travesty" losses over the years have been by "Citizen Kane," "The Graduate," "High Noon," "Goodfellas," "Pulp Fiction," "Apocalypse Now," "Raging Bull," "Raiders of the Lost Ark, and "E.T." Slate -Break- In advance of the "House of Cards" third season debuting Friday on Netflix, a new guide brings you up-to-speed..." »

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Boyhood or Birdman: Did the Oscars make the right Best Picture choice?

23 February 2015 6:18 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Neck-and-neck throughout most of awards season, Boyhood and Birdman duked it out for Oscar honours last night with Alejandro González Iñárritu emerging victorious in the Best Director and Best Picture Academy Awards field.

Boyhood's BAFTA sweep a week earlier had led many pundits to predict another big victory last night for Linklater's drama, but wins for Birdman at the Producers and Directors Guild Awards - two consistent Oscar forecasters - signified an upset. Once Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris and Armando Bo took to the Academy stage to accept the Best Screenplay Oscar is felt like it was always going to be Birdman's night.

The social media backlash was immediate, with fans and celebs commiserating Boyhood's loss. For some (see Entourage creator Doug Ellin below), this was in line with Ordinary People's victory over Raging Bull in 1981 or Crash's shock triumph over Brokeback Mountain in 2006. In truth, »

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Vote: Boyhood or Birdman? Did the Oscars make the right Best Picture choice?

23 February 2015 6:18 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Neck-and-neck throughout most of awards season, Boyhood and Birdman duked it out for Oscar honours last night with Alejandro González Iñárritu emerging victorious in the Best Director and Best Picture Academy Awards field.

Boyhood's BAFTA sweep a week earlier had led many pundits to predict another big victory last night for Linklater's drama, but wins for Birdman at the Producers and Directors Guild Awards - two consistent Oscar forecasters - signified an upset. Once Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris and Armando Bo took to the Academy stage to accept the Best Screenplay Oscar is felt like it was always going to be Birdman's night.

The social media backlash was immediate, with fans and celebs commiserating Boyhood's loss. For some (see Entourage creator Doug Ellin below), this was in line with Ordinary People's victory over Raging Bull in 1981 or Crash's shock triumph over Brokeback Mountain in 2006. In truth, »

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Martin Scorsese and The Departed

22 February 2015 2:31 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Martin Scorsese is one of the most iconic directors of all time. He created such groundbreaking films like Taxi Driver and Gangs of New York. Yet it took him eight Oscar nominations, five Best Director nominations alone, until he finally received the Best Director Academy Award in 2006 for the film The Departed. Let's look back at the film that finally landed Scorese the gold.

Scorsese is one of those directors that has been creating for generations. He's the known for creating and depicting the worst antiheroes that you can't help but like and can't stop watching. You follow them on their twisted journeys and sometimes untimely demises, all while that same Rolling Stone song (“Gimme Shelter”) plays in the background. Your parents loved him, you love him, and I'm sure your children will or already do love him. There's always one particular movie of his that you discover that makes »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Kelly McInerney)

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Watch: 33-Minute Video Essay 'Lessons Of The Wolf' Tackles Martin Scorsese's 'The Wolf Of Wall Street'

20 February 2015 1:24 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Almost every Martin Scorsese movie is worth a couple of watches. Throughout the years, I have found myself revisiting certain pictures of his again and again — “The King of Comedy,” “Raging Bull,” and “Taxi Driver” in particular — and finding that they often each play in an entirely different key. Few of his more recent films have caused the uproar generated by his 2013 smash “The Wolf of Wall Street” — many simply didn’t dig Scorsese’s groovily amoral expose in the soul-deadness of American capitalism and the prospect of spending three hours with a bunch of self-aggrandizing, misogynist scumbags simply wasn’t their idea of a good time. But of course, the picture has its fans: it’s Scorsese’s most rough, nasty, and purely entertaining movie since “Casino,” and many viewers simply got off on the presence of Jordan Belfort and his drugged-up, chest-thumping cronies, possibly without parsing the film’s acidic subtext about greed, »

- Nicholas Laskin

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7 stars who won Oscars for the wrong movie: Kate Winslet, Martin Scorsese

18 February 2015 1:30 AM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

In case you haven't heard, there are a lot of reasons to get angry at the Oscars. In general, awarding a statuette to someone who actually deserves it isn't one of them.

But sometimes, a deserving nominee gets passed over so many times that they finally end up winning an award for something that's not their best work, in what amounts to a kind of unofficial lifetime achievement award.

Digital Spy looks back at seven times the Academy gave out the right award for the wrong movie.

Martin Scorsese (The Departed)

For decades, Scorsese was the most glaring example of an undisputed great who was somehow yet to win an Oscar. Despite being nominated a total of six times, beginning with Raging Bull in 1981, Scorsese was the perpetual bridesmaid and never the bride (a dubious honour he's since passed on to regular collaborator Leonardo DiCaprio).

The seventh time turned out »

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'Dying of the Light' Nicolas Cage Featurette | Exclusive

17 February 2015 2:15 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Academy Award winner Nicolas Cage ignites a powder keg of action in the electrifying cloak-and-dagger thriller Dying of the Light, arriving on DVD, Blu-ray and Digital HD February 17th from Lionsgate Home Entertainment. To celebrate the upcoming release, we have a special sneak peek with an exclusive featurette that looks at the legacy of Nicolas Cage.

In Dying of the Light, Evan Lake (Nicolas Cage), a veteran CIA agent, has been ordered to retire. But when his prot&#233g&#233 (Anton Yelchin) uncovers evidence that Lake's nemesis, the terrorist Banir (Alexander Karim), has resurfaced, Lake goes rogue, embarking on a perilous, intercontinental mission to eliminate his sworn enemy.

Dying of the Light is currently available On Demand. The DVD and Blu-ray arrives today with bonus materials that include deleted/extended scenes, cast and crew interviews and a "making of" featurette. From the writer of Taxi Driver and co-writer of Raging Bull, »

- MovieWeb

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What We Do in the Shadows stakes ourscreen record

17 February 2015 5:03 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: 33 screenings for vampire mockumentary, starring Flight of the ConchordsJemaine Clement, on audience-led screening platform.

Vampire mockumentary What We Do In The Shadows has become the most booked film on audience-led screening platform ourscreen.

Metrodome released the film in cinemas on November 21 and accumulated box office of $525,000 (£341,838).

The distributor then booked a further 33 screenings of the film, on a revenue share basis, through platform ourscreen, which allows consumers to programme films at certain cinemas providing enough tickets are sold.

Sites to show the film to date include Hackney Picturehouse, City Screen York, Phoenix Oxford, Little Theatre Bath and Cambridge Picturehouse, with additional screenings likely.

What We Do In The Shadows stars Jemaine Clement (Flight of the Conchords) and Taika Waititi (Boy, Eagle vs Shark). The pair also co-directed the comedy, which is filmed in a documentary-style and centres on a group of vampire housemates in New Zealand whose happy home is disrupted by a new member »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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It’s Been 17 Years Since American Actors Have Swept the Oscar’s Acting Categories

12 February 2015 10:17 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor

On any given year, the four acting winners are usually a mix of American and non-American actors, but this year could see all four acting awards go to American actors for the first time in 17 years.

If Michael Keaton beats Eddie Redmayne for lead actor and the current projected frontrunners — supporting actress nominee Patricia Arquette, supporting actor nominee J.K. Simmons and lead actress nominee Julianne Moore — also win, it will be the first time since 1998 that all of the acting awards were given to American actors. (It will also be the second time in 77 years that all of the winners have been 46 or older.)

In contrast, the last time all four awards went to non-American actors was in 2008, when Daniel Day-Lewis, Marion Cotillard, Javier Bardem and Tilda Swinton all won.

Since 1980, there have been eight instances where American actors were awarded all four acting Oscars. »

- Anjelica Oswald

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StreamFix: 5 Amazing 'Best Supporting Actor' Winners to Watch Now

9 February 2015 3:58 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Now that these damn Grammys are out of the way, we can focus on the only meaningless award that matters: the Oscar. The Best Supporting Actor category has a varied and interesting past, and if you check out Netflix right now, you can drink in these legendary performances that picked up a trophy. George Sanders in "All About Eve" This is my personal pick for the best win in the Supporting Actor category. George Sanders plays the deadly droll Addison DeWitt, a theater critic whose snipes make or break thespian careers. He's enchanted (but not fooled) by the manipulative sociopath Eve Harrington (Anne Baxter), who sets out to supplant veteran actress Margo Channing (Bette Davis) as the reigning doyenne of the New York stage. Though Sanders is hilarious throughout "All About Eve," he rather poetically articulates the pleasure of theater (and, in doing so, sums up "Birdman") during his finest »

- Louis Virtel

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Whiplash Star Miles Teller Is Battered And Bruised In First Image For Bleed For This

6 February 2015 8:45 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

J.K. Simmons’ Terrence Fletcher may have pushed Miles Teller’s character close to breaking point in Whiplash both physically and emotionally, but in boxing drama Bleed For This, the up-and-coming actor is set to go through the wringer once more as the this first-look image attests.

Coming by way of The Hollywood Reporter, the still showcases the amount of weight that Teller shed in order to embody boxing legend Vinny Pazienza. Telling the true-life story of the maestro, Bleed For This will orbit around his journey in and out of the ring as his budding career is derailed by a car accident. Against doctor’s orders, our protagonist then undergoes a rigorous training regime under the watchful eye of Aaron Eckhart’s Kevin Rooney in order to make a triumphant return to a sport that is, for all intents and purposes, in his DNA.

Boiler Room director Ben Younger is behind the camera, »

- Michael Briers

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Berlin: Ethan Hawke Brings Jazz Pic ‘Born to Be Blue’ to Fest

4 February 2015 10:00 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

With his efforts to campaign for “Boyhood” almost complete, Ethan Hawke is turning his attention to the promotion of his latest film, “Born to Be Blue,” in which he plays jazz trumpeter Chet Baker. The film, which is being sold in Berlin by K5 Intl., is in post production.

Hawke is keen to explain that it is “not a conventional biopic, but rather a reimagining of Chet’s life.” He told Variety the film portrays “not what was, but what could have been.” He added: “I have been hypnotized by Chet Baker since I discovered him in Bruce Weber’s ‘Let’s Get Lost.’ Having lost River Phoenix and Philip Seymour Hoffman — two friends, two of the best minds of my generation — the tragedy feels particularly fresh to me.”

The film focuses on a period in Baker’s life in the 1960s when he loses his teeth in a violent attack. »

- Leo Barraclough

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Cinematographers pick the best-shot films of all time

4 February 2015 12:31 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Stumbling across that list of best-edited films yesterday had me assuming that there might be other nuggets like that out there, and sure enough, there is American Cinematographer's poll of the American Society of Cinematographers membership for the best-shot films ever, which I do recall hearing about at the time. But they did things a little differently. Basically, in 1998, cinematographers were asked for their top picks in two eras: films from 1894-1949 (or the dawn of cinema through the classic era), and then 1950-1997, for a top 50 in each case. Then they followed up 10 years later with another poll focused on the films between 1998 and 2008. Unlike the editors' list, though, ties run absolutely rampant here and allow for way more than 50 films in each era to be cited. I'd love to see what these lists would look like combined, however. I imagine "Citizen Kane," which was on top of the 1894-1949 list, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Film Publicist Marion Billings Dies at 91

4 February 2015 12:27 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

New York film publicist Marion Billings, who worked with some of the most prominent directors and actors in Hollywood, died Sunday at the Lillian Booth Actors Home in Englewood, N.J. She was 91.

While working with young directors including Martin Scorsese, Oliver Stone and Paul Mazursky, and helping foreign directors like Ingmar Bergman and Milos Forman reach American audiences, Billings publicized films including “Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore,” “Taxi Driver,” “Raging Bull,” “The Last Temptation of Christ,” “Goodfellas,” “Wall Street,” “Born on the Fourth of July,” “Kramer vs. Kramer” and “Fatal Attraction.”

Scorsese said in a statement Wednesday: “Marion Billings was one of the last of the old guard of publicists. It was never just business with Marion. Her clients all adored her, and I’m proud to say that I was one of them for many years. We started working together at the very beginning of my career, »

- Kevin Noonan

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Editors Guild Selects 75 Best Edited Films of All Time

4 February 2015 8:26 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Now this is a list that could result in a lot of fascinating dissection and thanks to HitFix it comes to our attention almost three years after it was originally released back in 2012, celebrating the Motion Picture Editors Guild's 75th anniversary. Over at HitFix, Kris Tapley asks, "Is this news to anyone elsec" Um, yes, I find it immensely interesting and a perfect starting point for anyone looking to further explore the art of film editing. In an accompanying article we get the particulars concerning what films were eligible and how films were to be considered: In our Jan-feb 12 issue, we asked Guild members to vote on what they consider to be the Best Edited Films of all time. Any feature-length film from any country in the world was eligible. And by "Best Edited," we explained, we didn't just mean picture; sound, music and mixing were to be considered as well. »

- Brad Brevet

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What is the best-edited film of all time according to those who do the job?

3 February 2015 8:43 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

A random bit of researching on a Tuesday night led me to something I didn't know existed: The Motion Picture Editors Guild's list of the 75 best-edited films of all time. It was a feature in part celebrating the Guild's 75th anniversary in 2012. Is this news to anyone else? I confess to having missed it entirely. Naturally, I had to dig in. What was immediately striking to me about the list — which was decided upon by the Guild membership and, per instruction, was considered in terms of picture and sound editorial as opposed to just the former — was the most popular decade ranking. Naturally, the 1970s led with 17 mentions, but right on its heels was the 1990s. I wouldn't have expected that but I happen to agree with the assessment. Thelma Schoonmaker's work on "Raging Bull" came out on top, an objectively difficult choice to dispute, really. It was so transformative, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Oscar Loves Diseases and Disorders: 6 Contenders and the Hard Truths They Don't (or Do) Ignore

27 January 2015 7:54 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Oscar often has a soft spot for an acting gimmick, something that proves that the performer has somehow shown themselves worthy of a gold statue by virtue of the physical and mental demands of their role. Extreme weight loss or gain has been a popular way to capture the attention of Academy voters. Christian Bale is the current champ at this form of acting, taking over from Robert De Niro, whose 60-pound weight gain for his Oscar-winning boxing role in 1980’s “Raging Bull” is the stuff of legend. In the past, the six-footer has packed on muscle for 2000’s “American Psycho” and for his Batman films. But, in between, he dropped an alarming number of pounds to achieve a rail-like physique in 2004’s “The Machinist” and 2006’s “Rescue Dawn.” But all his yo-yo dieting finally paid off with Oscar success when Bale won supporting as a crack-addict boxer in 2010’s »

- Susan Wloszczyna

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2015 Screen Actors Guild Award Winners: 'Birdman' Wins Best Ensemble, but is It the Oscar Frontrunnerc

25 January 2015 6:20 PM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

The 2015 Screen Actors Guild Awards were announced tonight and if you're like me, the Best Ensemble win for Birdman makes it your new frontrunner for Oscar's Best Picture as it has now won not only with the Producers Guild, but with the Screen Actors Guild. Of course, there is one oddity to this win, while it took home ensemble, Michael Keaton lost Best Actor to Eddie Redmayne (The Theory of Everything), Emma Stone lost Best Supporting Actress to Patricia Arquette (Boyhood) and Edward Norton lost Best Supporting Actor to J.K. Simmons (Whiplash). Apparently Birdman is all about the sum of its parts... I can accept that. The only category I haven't mentioned was Julianne Moore winning Best Actress for Still Alice and perhaps I don't mention that because it's quite simply a joke. Put that performance alongside the likes of Rosamund Pike (Gone Girl) and can you really tell me »

- Brad Brevet

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Watch how Martin Scorsese uses mirrors in his films

22 January 2015 8:41 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Whether it is Jake La Motta recounting stories or Leo’s Jordan Belfort slapping his drugged up mind, it all happens in a mirror.

A new video examines director Martin Scorsese’s use of mirrors in his films ranging from Taxi Driver to Raging Bull to Gangs of New York and his most recent work in The Wolf of Wall Street. Is Scorsese using it as a reflection on humanity? Is he commenting on the thwarted views of the characters?

Watch the video below to judge for yourself how Scorsese uses the mirror with his characters.

The post Watch how Martin Scorsese uses mirrors in his films appeared first on Sound On Sight.

»

- Zach Dennis

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 26 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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