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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 147 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


First Look: Nicolas Cage in Paul Schrader's Film 'Dying of the Light'

24 September 2014 4:03 PM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

Wait - Paul Schrader, screenwriter of Raging Bull & Taxi Driver and director of American Gigolo, cast Nicolas Cage in his new film? This has to be a joke? Nope. It's real, and it's already shot and finishing up for 2015 release. Schrader's new "mid-budget indie", which he wrote and directed, is titled Dying of the Light executive produced by fellow filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn. What a team-up this is: Schrader, Refn, Cage. Who else? Well, the cast includes Anton Yelchin (also seen in the photo), Alexander Karim and Irène Jacob. I won't deny that I'm curious about this. Take a look at the image below, which doesn't reveal much about the way this will play. Of all the recent Cage films, this is the one I'm most interested in. Here's the first photo from Paul Schrader's film Dying of the Light, debuted by Variety (via SlashFilm): The project has been in development for years, »

- Alex Billington

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20 Movie Auditions For Famous Roles You Need To See

16 September 2014 4:01 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

YouTube

When it comes to the really iconic characters in film history, we tend to get tremendously attached to the actors that play them. We assign ownership to these characters, and kind of forget that they didn’t always belong to the actors that brought them to life. Luke Skywalker wasn’t always Mark Hamill, and Indiana Jones wasn’t always Harrison Ford. Once upon a time, these parts were up for grabs, and these actors had to audition for them just like everybody else, competing with hundreds of other hopefuls. It’s amazing to sit down and watch the auditions that landed them these fantastic roles, which effectively changed the course of their careers.

But equally interesting are the auditions of actors who, for whatever reason, didn’t get the part, but went on to become celebrities for their work on other projects regardless. It’s a classic what if scenario. »

- Audrey Fox

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Page 2: Star Wars, GoT, Alien, Simpsons, Apes, Raging Bull, HttyD, Godzilla, Doctor Who, Bttf

8 September 2014 4:00 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 36 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. Header Photo: Acme Archives Launches “Join The Alliance” […]

The post Page 2: Star Wars, GoT, Alien, Simpsons, Apes, Raging Bull, HttyD, Godzilla, Doctor Who, Bttf appeared first on /Film. »

- Peter Sciretta

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‘Whiplash’ Director Damien Chazelle Inspired by His Own Band Days

7 September 2014 4:31 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Writer-director Damien Chazelle’s own experiences in a hyper-competitive high school jazz band helped to inspire “Whiplash,” his darkly comic portrait of an obsessive 19-year-old drummer (Miles Teller) trying to curry favor with a perfectionist bandleader (J.K. Simmons) who isn’t satisfied until there’s quite literally blood on the sheet music. A double winner of the dramatic grand jury prize and audience award at Sundance, the Sony Pictures Classics release made its international debut at Cannes, and plays Toronto Monday.

Variety: This movie really lays waste to the sentimental cliches of the inspirational-teacher drama. In Sundance, some people dubbed it “Full Metal Juilliard” or a sadomasochistic “Dead Poets Society.” It might also be called “To Sir, With Hate.”

Chazelle: When I started the script, I was just writing something in my mind about a drummer, though it could be any kind of artist, going as far as possible to be great, »

- Scott Foundas

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Venice: Thelma Schoonmaker On Working With Martin Scorsese, ‘Silence’ & Preserving Michael Powell’s Legacy

2 September 2014 2:37 PM, PDT | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

Thelma Schoonmaker was at the Venice Film Festival today to accept the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement. She was also on the Lido to present a restored version of her late husband Michael Powell’s The Tales Of Hoffman. I sat down with Martin Scorsese‘s longtime Oscar-winning editor for a chat this morning overlooking a raging Adriatic Sea. Our conversation ranged from two of the most important men in her life, to the controversy surrounding The Wolf Of Wall Street, the ways digital editing is changing the business, and getting ready for Scorsese’s passion project Silence.

Schoonmaker, who first edited a Scorsese film with Who’s That Knocking At My Door in 1967, and has cut each of his movies since Raging Bull, also works with the director to see Powell’s films restored and the word spread about the helmer of such classics as The Red Shoes, The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp »

- Nancy Tartaglione

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See Reddit users’ favorite movie from each year

2 September 2014 12:56 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Throughout the summer, an admin on the r/movies subreddit has been leading Reddit users in a poll of the best movies from every year for the last 100 years called 100 Years of Yearly Cinema. The poll concluded three days ago, and the list of every movie from 1914 to 2013 has been published today.

Users were asked to nominate films from a given year and up-vote their favorite nominees. The full list includes the outright winner along with the first two runners-up from each year. The list is mostly a predictable assortment of IMDb favorites and certified classics, but a few surprise gems have also risen to the top of the crust, including the early experimental documentary Man With a Movie Camera in 1929, Abel Gance’s J’Accuse! in 1919, the Fred Astaire film Top Hat over Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps in 1935, and Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing over John Ford’s »

- Brian Welk

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Jake Gyllenhaal on Losing 30 Pounds and Himself in ‘Nightcrawler’

2 September 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Jake Gyllenhaal has a razor-thin scar on the palm of his hand. It’s a permanent souvenir from the set of “Nightcrawler,” the Toronto Film Festival thriller, in which the actor plays a twisted crime paparazzo. On the Los Angeles shoot last fall, director Dan Gilroy was filming Gyllenhaal simmering alone in a house after his character, Lou, suffers a professional setback. “We were in the middle of a scene with a mirror,” Gyllenhaal recalls on a recent afternoon. “I hit the mirror.” The violent act wasn’t in the script, and Gyllenhaal still isn’t sure what propelled him to do it. “It was just a choice in that moment that happened,” says Gyllenhaal, who accidentally sliced open his hand on a shard of glass.

Doctors at Cedars-Sinai eventually stopped the bleeding and stitched him up, and Gyllenhaal returned to work eight hours later, with his wrist wrapped in gauze. »

- Ramin Setoodeh

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Watch this Fantastic Video Essay: ‘Martin Scorsese The Art of Silence’

28 August 2014 2:49 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

 

Martin Scorsese is unquestionably a brilliant director of unparalleled talent. His films not only explore common themes but also are heightened by Scorsese’ touch for realism. When you think of Scorsese’s trademarks, a few things immediately spring to mind: slow-motion sequences, complex tracking shots, distortions of perspective, shaky camerawork, narration and so much more. While he’s known for all of these things, we very rarely talk about his use of silence in his movies. Tony Zhou recently put together this amazing six-minute video essay which showcases how the great American director uses silence throughout his career, picking some highlights from such films as Raging Bull, Goodfellas and The Last Temptation of Christ to name a few. This is a fantastic video and comes in perfect timing considering Scorsese next film is titled Silence.

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The post Watch this Fantastic Video Essay: ‘Martin Scorsese The Art of Silence’ appeared first on Sound On Sight. »

- Ricky

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Badass Grandpas: ‘The Expendables 3′ and 12 More Seasoned Stars

15 August 2014 10:55 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

When Bette Davis coined the phrase “Old age is no place for sissies,” she may as well have been describing the plot of “The Expendables 3.” Written by and starring Sylvester Stallone, the ensemble film features a cast of mature action vets who aren’t about to trade in their bullets for bifocals just yet. As the third entry in the popular franchise explodes into theaters on August 15, here’s a look at 12 films starring some of the toughest seniors in cinema.

Non-Stop

Continuing his late-career reinvention as a post-middle aged action hero, Liam Neeson plays a federal air marshal who receives a series of threatening texts during a transatlantic flight. Trapping the 62-year old star in a confined location proved a wise decision as the modestly-budgeted thriller opened at No. 1 in the U.S. and earned over $200 million worldwide.

The Equalizer

Arriving on September 26, this feature adaptation of the »

- Matthew Chernov

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Elderly action heroes and Hollywood age issues

14 August 2014 12:48 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

The arrival of The Expendables 3 leads James to the conclusion that, when it comes to being an action hero, age is just a number...

"All I have produced before the age of 70 is not worth taking into account. At 73 I have learned a little... a little about the real structure of nature, of animals, plants, trees, birds, fishes and insects. In consequence when I am 80, I shall have made still more progress. At 90 I shall penetrate the mystery of things; at 100 I shall certainly have reached a marvellous stage; and when I am 110, everything I do, be it a dot or a line, will be alive." - Hokusai, the Japanese artist who painted the famous 'Great Wave off Kanagawa' and kept on creating astounding art until his death at the age of 88.

"I'm too old for this shit." - Roger Murtaugh, the Lapd homicide detective played by Danny Glover »

- ryanlambie

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Page 2: The Wizard, Snowpiercer, Doctor Who, Muppets, Battlestar, Aladdin, Raging Bull, Ghostbusters, Bttf, Harry Potter

7 August 2014 4:00 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 36 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. Header Photo: The Wizard action figure 28 Things […]

The post Page 2: The Wizard, Snowpiercer, Doctor Who, Muppets, Battlestar, Aladdin, Raging Bull, Ghostbusters, Bttf, Harry Potter appeared first on /Film. »

- Peter Sciretta

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Watch: If Cliff Martinez Scored Martin Scorsese's 'Raging Bull' It Might Look Something Like This

7 August 2014 12:23 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Even if you don't know his name, you know his scores. From his work for Nicolas Winding Refn ("Drive," "Only God Forgives"), Harmony Korine ("Spring Breakers"), Robert Redford ("The Company You Keep") and ten collaborations with Steven Soderbergh (including "The Knick," listen to a track here), Cliff Martinez has established a distinct voice with his pulsating, throbbing compositions. One filmmaker he has yet to work with is Martin Scorsese, and seemingly just because, someone decided to mashup Martinez's work with "Raging Bull." As we much as like both Martinez and Scorsese, based on this edit at least, they don't seem a particularly suited match. Or at least "Raging Bull" may not be the right movie to put Martinez's music on top of (maybe "After Hours" would've made more sense). Either way, this is an interesting experiment and is worth watching anyway to illustrate that getting the right music and »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Jay Z Can Thank Supreme Court for Setback in 'Big Pimpin' Lawsuit

6 August 2014 9:35 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

History might record Jay Z as being one of the first victims of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision last May to allow Paula Petrella to sue MGM and 20th Century Fox over the Martin Scorsese film, Raging Bull. What does Jay Z have to do with Raging Bull? It's summed up by one word: laches. The hip-hop star is involved in a lawsuit that's now seven years old over his sampling of "Khosara, Khosara," from the 1960 Egyptian film Fata Ahlami, used in his 2000 mega-hit song, "Big Pimpin." The plaintiff in the case is

read more

»

- Eriq Gardner

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The Story of Hollywood in Just 10 Filmsc

5 August 2014 9:57 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Over at The Telegraph, Robbie Collin has chosen to take on the impossible, he's set out to create a list of films that tells the story of Hollywood "in terms of how one picture or director led to the next." It's a daunting task that creates an interesting narrative and he prefaces his ten selections saying: ...none of the individual works is "great" or "important" enough to drown out the others. I've avoided films such as Citizen Kane, Vertigo, Singin' in the Rain, Casablanca, Gone with the Wind, Lawrence of Arabia and The Godfather, not just because we already know they're great, but because their greatness might throw the story off-balance - although I wouldn't hesitate to describe any of the films that are on this list as a masterpiece. So how does his list shape outc Have a look: One Week (1920) - dir. Buster Keaton It Happened One Night (1934) - dir. »

- Brad Brevet

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Robert De Niro's 10 best performances: Deer Hunter, Raging Bull

2 August 2014 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

In 1995 and 1997, Robert Anthony De Niro Jr. had Heat and Jackie Brown released into cinemas. Not his best films or his best performances, perhaps, but mesmerising work in excellent pictures directed by master filmmakers: the former saw him convince for Michael Mann as the cool, meticulous leader of a gang of career criminals; the latter had Quentin Tarantino give viewers a dim crim whose uncontrollable anger contributes to the unravelling of a heist.

For a whole generation of moviegoers who have grown up since, however, the adulation that's universally showered upon De Niro must be perplexing. Occasionally he summons up a portion of his old intensity – his turns in What Just Happened, Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle are the (slim) picks of the last 15 years – but for anyone who got into movies from the late '90s on, he's the funny guy in Analyze This and Meet The Parents, »

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Venice Film Festival Awards Golden Lions to Thelma Schoonmaker and Frederick Wiseman

18 July 2014 12:03 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The Venice International Film Festival, now celebrating its 71st birthday, has named film editor Thelma Schoonmaker and film director Frederick Wiseman as recipients of the Golden Lions for Lifetime Achievement. The Board of Directors of the Biennale di Venezia, under chair Paolo Baratta, and festival director Alberto Barbera, made the final decision. One of the most lauded editors in the business, Schoonmaker won three Oscars for Scorsese films "Raging Bull," "The Aviator" and "The Departed," and continues to promote the films and writings of late husband Michael Powell. Schoonmaker is the first editor to receive the Golden Lion. Intrepid indie doc filmmaker Frederick Wiseman, no stranger to Venice, has made over 40 films that capture everyday human reality around the world, from "Titicut Follies" in 1967 to "Public Housing" in 1997, and new masterpieces "La danse" in 2009 and 2013's "At Berkeley." His most »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Venice to Honor Thelma Schoonmaker, Frederick Wiseman

18 July 2014 10:28 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

London — Film editor Thelma Schoonmaker and director Frederick Wiseman will be feted at the 71st Venice Intl. Film Festival, where they will receive Golden Lions for lifetime achievement.

Schoonmaker won Oscars for “Raging Bull,” “The Aviator” and “The Departed,” and BAFTAs for “Raging Bull” and “Goodfellas.”

It is the first time that the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement has been awarded to a film editor.

Wiseman has made 39 documentaries and two fiction films. His docus include “Titicut Follies” (1967), “Welfare” (1975), “Public Housing” (1997) and “Near Death” (1989).

The complete program of the Venice Film Festival will be presented at a press conference in Rome on July 24.

The fest runs Aug. 27-Sept. 6.

»

- Leo Barraclough

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Venice to honour Schoonmaker, Wiseman

18 July 2014 9:57 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

It is the first time a film editor has received the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the Venice Film Festival.

Film editor Thelma Schoonmaker and film director Frederick Wiseman, are to be the recipients of the Golden Lions for Lifetime Achievement of the 71st Venice International Film Festival, which runs August 27-Sept 6.

Schoonmaker has received three Oscars (Raging Bull, The Aviator, The Departed) and two BAFTAs (Raging Bull, Goodfellas) during her career as an editor. Since 1980 she has edited all of Scorsese’s feature-length films including the most recent, The Wolf of Wall Street (2013). I

It is the first time the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement has been awarded by the Venice Film Festival to an artist in the field of film editing.

Film director Frederick Wiseman’s acclaimed documentaries include Titicut Follies (1967), Welfare (1975), Public Housing (1997), Near Death (1989), La Comédie Française ou L’amour joué (1996), La danse – Le ballet de l’Opéra de Paris (2009) and [link=tt »

- sarah.cooper@screendaily.com (Sarah Cooper)

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Schoonmaker, Wiseman Venice honorees

18 July 2014 9:57 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

It is the first time a film editor has received the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement at the Venice Film Festival.

Film editor Thelma Schoonmaker and film director Frederick Wiseman, are to be the recipients of the Golden Lions for Lifetime Achievement of the 71st Venice International Film Festival, which runs August 27-Sept 6.

Schoonmaker has received three Oscars (Raging Bull, The Aviator, The Departed) and two BAFTAs (Raging Bull, Goodfellas) during her career as an editor. Since 1980 she has edited all of Scorsese’s feature-length films including the most recent, The Wolf of Wall Street (2013). I

It is the first time the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement has been awarded by the Venice Film Festival to an artist in the field of film editing.

Film director Frederick Wiseman’s acclaimed documentaries include Titicut Follies (1967), Welfare (1975), Public Housing (1997), Near Death (1989), La Comédie Française ou L’amour joué (1996), La danse – Le ballet de l’Opéra de Paris (2009) and [link=tt »

- sarah.cooper@screendaily.com (Sarah Cooper)

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10 of geek cinema's more curious quirks of fate

10 July 2014 6:20 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

We take a light-hearted look at a few of the more strange coincidences and quirks of fate in recent cinema history...

Top 10

Stories are often built on coincidences and happenstance. Chance encounters at railway stations. Bruce Willis bumping into Ving Rhames while he's out and about in his Honda in Pulp Fiction. But what about those weird patterns we see in our everyday reality, or, more to the point, in cinema history?

When Batman Begins came out, it was widely noted that Christian Bale had already played an unfathomably rich man with a secret double life before, in Mary Harron's adaptation of American Psycho. Bale's character, Patrick Bateman, even has a surname that's basically Batman with an 'e' added to it.

Those are the kinds of strange quirks of fate we're looking at here. If you have any of your own, do share them in the comments section.

10. Instruments »

- ryanlambie

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 147 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


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