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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 87 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Coming Distractions: Robert De Niro returns to the boxing ring in the Hands Of Stone trailer

21 July 2016 8:31 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

In 1980, Robert De Niro delivered an Oscar-winning performance as Jake La Motta in Raging Bull, the Martin Scorsese masterpiece that set a high water mark for both biographical narratives and boxing films. For many years, the compound image of De Niro and a boxing ring was indisputably evocative of cinematic excellence. And then, in 2013, he starred alongside Sylvester Stallone in Grudge Match, and that compound image suddenly had an unpleasant amount of bodily fluids splattered across it.

Now, he’s trying to clean up some of that mess. In Hands Of Stone, the 72-year-old veteran actor plays Ray Arcel, the master trainer who stood in the corner of 18 world champions. One of those was Roberto Durán, the Panamanian fighter who came in fifth in The Ring’s countdown of the sport’s greatest talents of the past eight decades. Written and directed by Venezuelan filmmaker Jonathan Jakubowicz ...

»

- Dennis DiClaudio

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Edgar Ramirez Has Hands Of Stone And Nerves Of Steel In New Trailer For Boxing Flick

20 July 2016 2:44 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Last year, it was Southpaw and the rather excellent Creed that enthralled the moviegoing masses, but 2016 is cooking up a one-two punch of its own. Before Miles Teller learns to Bleed For This in November, it is Edgar Ramirez who will step into the ring for Hands of Stone, The Weinstein Company’s starry biopic that finds Robert De Niro in the role of accomplished trainer, Ray Arcel.

De Niro, who so brilliantly captured the imagination of a generation in Raging Bull, will find himself on the other side of the ropes in Jonathan Jakubowicz’s feature. It’s one he wrote and directed, too, chronicling the inspired journey of Panamanian boxer, Roberto Durån.

Celebrated as one of the finest fighters the sport has ever produced, Edgar Ramirez will don the boxing gloves in TWC’s feature film, as it charts Durån’s rise and rise to the tip-top of the boxing hierarchy, »

- Michael Briers

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New 'Hands Of Stone' Trailer is Here!!

20 July 2016 1:19 PM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

The Weinstein Company released the new full-length trailer for director Jonathan Jakubowicz's boxing drama, Hands Of Stone. The film is based on the true story of boxer Robert Duran who grew up on the streets of Panama only to grow up and become one of the greatest boxers in the world. 

Duran was nicknamed 'Hands of Stone' for his 103 wins in 119 fights in his boxing career. Duran was known to have a competitive rivalry with boxer Sugar Ray Leonard as the two faced each other many times in the ring. 

Actor Edgar Ramirez (Zero Dark Thirty) portrays Duran while two time Oscar-winning actor Robert De Niro (Raging Bull) plays his trainer, Ray Arcel. Usher Raymond, Ana de Armas, Ellen Barkin and John Turturro round out the cast.

Hands Of Stone follows the life of Roberto Duran (Edgar Ramirez), the Panamanian fighter who made his professional debut in »

- Kellvin Chavez

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Cleveland According to Movies and Television

19 July 2016 12:24 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Our perception of the Forest City having only seen it on screen.

All this week, Cleveland, Ohio, is being overrun with politicians, their supporters, and protestors of their platforms as the Republican National Convention is being held at the Quicken Loans Arena through Thursday. To help get a better sense of this “Cleve-Land,” as Howard the Duck calls it, we’re looking to entertainment, specifically movies and television, for what it can tell us about this city. If there’s anything we miss or misunderstand, blame Hollywood.

Cleveland Rocks

It’s the Rock and Roll Capital of the World, home of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, so it’s not surprising that, to an outsider, Cleveland primarily looks like a city where music reigns. You could make a nice concert with all the fictional bands based there, including Cherry Bomb from Howard the Duck, The Barbusters from Light of Day, the »

- Christopher Campbell

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Sing Street,’ ‘A Touch of Zen,’ ‘To Have and Have Not,’ and More

19 July 2016 8:51 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Night & Fog (Alain Resnais)

Ten years after the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps, filmmaker Alain Resnais documented the abandoned grounds of Auschwitz and Majdanek in Night and Fog (Nuit et brouillard), one of the first cinematic reflections on the Holocaust. Juxtaposing the stillness of the abandoned camps’ empty buildings with haunting wartime footage, Resnais investigates humanity’s capacity for violence, and presents the devastating suggestion that such horrors could occur again. – Criterion

Sing Street (John Carney)

Returning »

- The Film Stage

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Kobe Bryant on His Retirement: ‘The Biggest Challenge Is Finding What Comes Next’

14 July 2016 6:06 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Three months after his retirement, Kobe Bryant is trying to make his way as a Hollywood producer.

“I’m passionate about storytelling,” Bryant said Thursday afternoon at the Variety-Sports Illustrated Entertainment Summit in Los Angeles. “How do we tell stories that jump from the page? That gets me going.”

Bryant, in a half-hour discussion with Sports Illustrated senior writer Lee Jenkins, said his focus is on his Kobe Inc. studio operation. He cut Jenkins off in the middle of his question about becoming a basketball coach, evoking laughs from the several hundred attendees.

“Nope, I will not coach basketball,” Bryant said. “I’ll show my kids some tips but that’s about it. I love teaching and I just think my personality is that if I’m going to do something, I’m going to do it 100%. So I can coach a team of 12 players or I can make stories that reach a larger audience. »

- Dave McNary and Lamarco McClendon

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‘The Scorsese Machine’ Documentary Shows Vintage Footage of a Legendary Director at Work

13 July 2016 11:48 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Sometimes, when thinking of genius directors, it’s hard not to imagine them as constantly creating and working on their passion — hidden in a bubble of creativity with like-minded individuals always striving towards a vision. In reality, there is a lot of stuff in between. A 1990 documentary titled The Scorsese Machine follows the New York-born auteur through a day-in-the-life look at his life in the film business. A key phrase there is “business.” Phone calls, meetings, and general scrambling-around are motifs throughout the piece.

Even when every word cannot be made out through the clipping and grain, it is fascinating to see a seminal director handle day-to-day activities. Directed by André S. Labarthe, it also features a rather ingenious title card, with a long pushing shot that glides through a door, over a television playing Raging Bull, and looks at a desk where Scorsese sits talking hurriedly on the phone. »

- Mike Mazzanti

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Green Room,’ ‘Everybody Want Some!!,’ ‘My Golden Days’ & More

12 July 2016 7:26 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Belladonna of Sadness (Eiichi Yamamoto)

It all begins with Once Upon a Time. Such a simple introduction for Belladonna of Sadness, a 1973 Japanese animated feature whose newfound legacy includes a decades-long disappearance, a dramatic re-emergence, and a growing reputation as a frenzied, pornographic freakout. The final entry in anime elder statesman Osamu Tezuka‘s erotic Animerama trilogy has remained largely unknown to even the most die-hard cult cinephiles, a fate determined after its commercial failure bankrupted Tezuka’s production company, »

- The Film Stage

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Is Nicolas Winding Refn Betraying His Own Talent?

10 July 2016 9:18 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Two weekends ago, Nicolas Winding Refn’s glitzy surreal horror film “The Neon Demon” opened on 783 screens, and when the weekend was over the box-office tally was far scarier than anything in the movie. Presented as a “mainstream” crossover thriller, the film had grossed just $589,000, with a mind-bendingly low per-screen average of $752. When a movie that’s striving to be a work of art falls on its face commercially, there’s no shame in that failure. The history of cinema is dotted with great films that didn’t, at first blush, find their audience, and then become appreciated over time. Yet in this case, the failure may contain a lesson.

The reason that Amazon Studios shoved “The Neon Demon” into so many theaters in the first place is that the relatively young company was betting — reasonably, I would say — that the movie, on its gorgeously bloody Day-Glo surface, was studded »

- Owen Gleiberman

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“Sultan is staggeringly engaging, remarkably rugged and unexpectedly romantic” Subhash K Jha Review

6 July 2016 7:15 AM, PDT | Bollyspice | See recent Bollyspice news »

Sultan

Starring Salman Khan, Anushka Sharma

Directed by Ali Abbas Zafar

Nope, you can’t touch this. Salman Khan’s superstardom is beyond the precincts of rationale or logic. To his credit he is now finally surrendering to his characters. After last year’s Eid’s heartwarming Bajrangi Bhaijaan act, this festive season Salman pushes himself physically and emotionally to a new level of commitment in Sultan.

Playing the goodhearted solidly dependable Haryanvi wrestler Salman brings a kind of feisty vulnerability along with a spiritual certainty to his instantly likeable character. He is no longer interested in being Salman Khan on screen. The physical and emotional transformation is so palpable and authentic as to remind us of what Robert de Niro achieved in and outside the boxing ring in Martin Scorcese’s Raging Bull.

Salman’s accent is pitch-perfect. And that’s where the performance begins. While the actor takes himself dead seriously, »

- Subhash K Jha

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Cinematographer Michael Chapman Honored at Camerimage Film Festival

6 July 2016 3:50 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Oscar-nominated cinematographer Michael Chapman, a frequent collaborator with helmer Martin Scorsese, will be the recipient of the Camerimage Film Festival’s Lifetime Achievement award in November.

Chapman, whose credits include “Taxi Driver,” “Raging Bull” and “The Lost Boys,” boasts a career that spans more than four decades. Born in Boston in 1935, he enjoyed one of the most important partnerships of his career with Scorsese and his opening title shot of “Raging Bull,” an image of a lonely boxer fighting himself in slow motion shrouded in something resembling fog, became a signature shot for both the director and cinematographer.

Throughout the 1970s he worked with Philip Kaufman on “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” and “The Wanderers” and served as Bill Butler’s camera operator on Steven Spielberg’s “Jaws.”

Chapman also paired with Scorsese on documentaries “The Last Waltz” and “American Boy: A Profile of Steven Prince,” before making his »

- Diana Lodderhose

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Raging Bull's Michael Chapman to receive Camerimage honour

6 July 2016 2:57 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

DoP behind Taxi Driver, The Lost Boys and Michael Jackson’s Bad to receive lifetime award.

Cinematographer Michael Chapman, two-time Oscar nominated for Raging Bull (1980) and The Fugative (1993), is to receive a lifetime achievement award at Camerimage.

The 24th International Film Festival of the Art of Cinematography will be held in Bydgoszcz, Poland from Nov 12-19.

When he retired from filmmaking in 2006, Chapman’s left a legacy of more than four decades of film images places him among the elite of Us cinematographers.

Born near Boston in 1935, Chapman’s most important partnerships was with Us director Martin Scorsese, his collaborator on several film projects.

A few years before Raging Bull, they had made Taxi Driver. During the second half of the 1970s, Chapman also worked on Scorsese documentaries The Last Waltz and American Boy: A Profile of Steven Prince.

After making his directorial debut in 1983 with All the Right Moves - starring a then unknown [link=nm »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Only Yesterday,’ ‘The In-Laws,’ ‘Boy & the World’ & More

5 July 2016 8:35 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Boy & the World (Alê Abreu)

Crayon-like scribblings and simple geometric patterns meticulously complicate themselves like a fractal over the course of this child’s-eye odyssey through the global struggle between humankind and the forces that oppress it. Kaleidoscopic visuals use repetition to explore the communal nature of both work and celebration. This film continually pulls back to show the larger picture of society, its visuals becoming more complex in kind, before it reduces to a more intimate view »

- The Film Stage

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Feel the burn: match the insult to the movie – quiz

5 July 2016 3:33 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

In this week’s lurid horror The Neon Demon, Elle Fanning has a sharp-edged introduction to the fashion industry. But how well do you know other bitchy cinematic quips?

"You are physically repulsive, intellectually retarded, you're morally reprehensible, vulgar, insensitive, selfish, stupid, you have no taste, a lousy sense of humour and you smell"

A Fish Called Wanda

9 to 5

The Witches of Eastwick

The War of the Roses

"He's not ugly. He's completely unattractive"

Mean Girls

Young Adult

Margot at the Wedding

10 Things I Hate About You

"There are really only two things I dislike about you. Your face"

All About Eve

The Mirror Crack'd

The Devil Wears Prada

Drop Dead Gorgeous

"You're not worth the trouble it would take to hit you! You're not worth the powder it would take to blow you up"

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

The Hangover

Revolutionary Road

Blue Valentine

"Everything that comes out »

- Benjamin Lee

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Bleed for This Trailer Puts Miles Teller in the Boxing Ring

30 June 2016 3:10 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Boxing may not be nearly as popular as it used to be, but the sport has a long history of athletes who have inspired some incredible movies. Raging Bull told the life story of iconic pugilist Jake Lamotta, while the beloved Rocky was loosely based on a little known fighter named Chuck Wepner, who shocked the world by going all 15 rounds against the great Muhammad Ali n 1975. Later this year, another legendary boxing tale will be told when Bleed for This hits theaters, with the first trailer debuting today.

Bleed For This is the incredible true story of one of the most inspiring and unlikely comebacks in sports history. Miles Teller (Whiplash, Divergent) stars as Vinny "The Pazmanian Devil" Pazienza, a local Providence boxer who shot to stardom after winning 2 world title fights. After a near-fatal car accident leaves Vinny with a severed spine, doctors tell him he may never walk again. »

- MovieWeb

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Paul Newman Talks About The Joy (And Pain) Of Finally Winning His Oscar In 1987 Interview – Watch

30 June 2016 9:16 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Color of Money” wasn’t a Martin Scorsese project: iI was a Paul Newman project. The acclaimed actor, an enormous fan of “Raging Bull,” wrote the director a fan letter asking to make a picture based on a 1984 novel by Walter Tevis. The resulting film is one of Scorsese’s most uncharacteristic, framing the story as comeback narrative for Newman’s pool hustler Fast Eddie Felson — though it’s arguable they never really show him leaving the game at all.

The final film lets Newman’s star persona bounce off the power of a rising Tom Cruise in an oddly sweet and optimistic package, one that would finally win Paul Newman his first Oscar in 1987 for Best Actor. A few weeks before the ceremony, Newman sat down with “Film 87” host Russell Harty to talk about that elusive trophy, as well as what it’s like to be Paul Newman »

- Russell Goldman

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Dr. Strangelove,’ ‘Clouds of Sils Maria,’ ‘Cemetery of Splendor,’ and More

28 June 2016 7:31 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Cemetery of Splendor (Apichatpong Weerasethakul)

If it is by now redundant to say that Thai filmmaker Apichatpong Weerasethakul (who understands pronunciation troubles and insists people call him “Joe”) is truly in a class of his own, we might blame both the general excellence of his output — a large oeuvre consisting of features, shorts, and installations — and the difficulty that’s often associated with describing them in either literal or opinion-based terms. The further one gets into his work, »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Knight of Cups,’ ‘Midnight Special,’ ‘Embrace of the Serpent,’ and More

21 June 2016 7:56 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Embrace of the Serpent (Ciro Guerra)

With its focus on the effects of exploration by white men on foreign lands, Ciro Guerra’s Oscar-nominated Embrace of the Serpent will inevitably be compared to Werner Herzog’s stories of savage nature, and while Guerra is investigating some of Herzog’s most well trodden themes, the chaos of man exists in the background, while the unspoiled sit front and center here. Embrace of the Serpent centers on two explorers, separated by decades in time, »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ’10 Cloverfield Lane, ’45 Years,’ ‘La Chienne,’ and More

14 June 2016 6:43 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

10 Cloverfield Lane (Dan Trachtenberg)

Forget the Cloverfield connection. The actors who were in this film didn’t even know what the title was until moments before the first trailer dropped. Producer J.J. Abrams used that branding as part of the wrapping for its promotional mystery box, but the movie stands perfectly alone from 2008’s found-footage monster picture. Hell, 10 Cloverfield Lane perhaps doesn’t even take place within the same fictional universe as that film — although a friend asked if it’s secretly a Super 8 sequel, and, honestly, you could think of it as one without contradicting anything in either movie. Whether the Cloverfield name fills you with wariness or enthusiasm, it would be unwise to burden Dan Trachtenberg‘s film with such prejudices. – Dan S. (full review)

45 Years (Andrew Haigh)

Andrew Haigh’s third feature as a director, 45 Years, is an excellent companion piece to its 2011 predecessor, Weekend. The latter examined the inception of a potential relationship between two men over the course of a weekend, whereas its successor considers the opposite extreme. Again sticking to a tight timeframe, the film chronicles the six days leading up to a couple’s 45th wedding anniversary. Though highly accomplished, Weekend nevertheless suffered from a tendency towards commenting on itself as a gay issues film, which at times overrode the otherwise compelling realism. Despite treating material arguably even more underrepresented in cinema – senior relationships – Haigh avoids this same self-reflexive pitfall in 45 Years, pulling off an incisive and emotionally ensnaring tour de force. – Giovanni M.C. (full review)

Here Comes Mr. Jordan (Alexander Hall)

A sophisticated supernatural Hollywood comedy whose influence continues to be felt, Here Comes Mr. Jordan stars the eminently versatile Robert Montgomery as a working-class boxer and amateur aviator whose plane crashes in a freak accident. He finds himself in heaven but is told, by a wry angel named Mr. Jordan (Claude Rains), that his death was a clerical error, and that he can return to Earth by entering the body of a corrupt (and about-to-be-murdered) financier—whose soul could use a transplant. Nominated for seven Oscars (it won two) and the inspiration for a sequel with Rita Hayworth and two remakes, Alexander Hall’s effervescent Here Comes Mr. Jordan is comic perfection. – Criterion.com

La Chienne (Jean Renoir)

Jean Renoir’s ruthless love triangle tale, his second sound film, is a true precursor to his brilliantly bitter The Rules of the Game, displaying all of the filmmaker’s visual genius and fully imbued with his profound humanity. Michel Simon cuts a tragic figure as an unhappily married cashier and amateur painter who becomes so smitten with a prostitute that he refuses to see the obvious: that she and her pimp boyfriend are taking advantage of him. Renoir’s elegant compositions and camera movements carry this twisting narrative—a stinging commentary on class and sexual divisions—to an unforgettably ironic conclusion. – Criterion.com

Also Arriving This Week

Eddie the Eagle (review)

Hello, My Name is Doris (review)

Get a Job (review)

Gold

Recommended Deals of the Week

Top Deal: A selection of Clint Eastwood and Steven Spielberg Blu-rays are under $10 this week.

All the President’s Men (Blu-ray) – $7.79

The American (Blu-ray) – $6.68

Amelie (Blu-ray) – $8.99

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (Blu-ray) – $7.88

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The Cabin in the Woods (Blu-ray) – $9.99

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Interstellar (Blu-ray) – $5.00

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John Wick (Blu-ray) – $8.00

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Pulp Fiction (Blu-ray) – $8.48

Raging Bull: 30th Anniversary Edition (Blu-ray) – $10.19

Re-Animator (Blu-ray) – $9.99

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Steve Jobs (Blu-ray) – $9.99

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Whiplash (Blu-ray) – $9.99

The Witch (Blu-ray) – $14.96

The Wrestler (Blu-ray) – $7.00

See all Blu-ray deals.

What are you picking up this week?

»

- The Film Stage

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The War With Grandpa (2017): Robert De Niro In Negotiations For Lead Role

14 June 2016 3:00 AM, PDT | Film-Book | See recent Film-Book news »

Robert De Niro in talks to star in The War With Grandpa. The Academy Award-winning Raging Bull and The Godfather actor is reportedly close to reaching an agreement to helm the youth adaptation. Based on the Robert Kimmel Smith novel of the same name, the production is currently undergoing a rewrite by Matt Ember and […] »

- Reggie Peralta

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