The adventures of the sailor man and his friends in the seaside town of Sweethaven.

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(screenplay), (based on characters by)
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ON DISC
3 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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MacIntyre Dixon ...
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Allan F. Nicholls ...
Rough House (as Allan Nicholls)
Wesley Ivan Hurt ...
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Robert Fortier ...
David McCharen ...
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Storyline

Buff sailor-man Popeye arrives in an awkward seaside town called Sweethaven. There he meets Wimpy, a hamburger-loving man; Olive Oyl, the soon-to-be love of his life; and Bluto, a huge, mean pirate who's out to make Sweethaven pay for no good reason. Popeye also discovers his long-lost Pappy in the middle of it all, so with a band of his new friends, Popeye heads off to stop Bluto, and he's got the power of spinach, which Popeye detests, to butt Bluto right in the mush. Watch as Popeye mops the floor with punks in a burger joint, stops a greedy tax man, takes down a champion boxer, and even finds abandoned baby Swee'pea. He's strong to the finish 'cause he eats his spinach! Written by Dylan Self <robocoptng986127@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Blow me down! It's comink for Chrustmas! See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

12 December 1980 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Popeye - Der Seemann mit dem harten Schlag  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$50,000,000 (USA)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of the storefronts in Sweethaven reads "O.G. WATTASNOZZLE", Professor O.G. Wottasnozzle was a character who appeared in the "Thimble Theater" comic "Sappo". See more »

Goofs

During the scene in the Diner where Whimpy sits down at Popeyes table there are two ketchup bottles present. Each time the shot switches perspective, one of the bottles keeps going from half full to completely full. See more »

Quotes

Popeye: I'm your one and only exspring. See, we got the same bulgy arms.
Poopdeck Pappy: No resemblance.
Popeye: We-we got the same squinky eye.
Poopdeck Pappy: What squinky eye?
Popeye: That's going to be hard for you to see. Oh, we even got the same pipe, Pap.
Poopdeck Pappy: You idiot, you can't inherit a pipe! Ooh, I am poppa to no male. Nor no female child. That no court could prove otherwise.
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Crazy Credits

The closing credits scroll over a scene of Bluto swimming across the ocean. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Footballers' Wives: Fall from Grace (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

He's Large
(uncredited)
Music and Lyrics by Harry Nilsson
Performed by Shelley Duvall and Chorus
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User Reviews

 
One Eye Wide Shut
3 December 2003 | by (Virginia Beach) – See all my reviews

This project was reviled by critics and disowned by Altman and Williams. It corresponded to DuVal's breakdown, and was all but the end of the heavy drinker Nilsson's adventures in film.

But I think its great. You have to remember that it predates every comic/cartoon to film project except 'Superman,' which really was a version of the TeeVee show. And you have to appreciate that 'Popeye' the cartoon is one of the very few that featured humans and therefore was more abstract than most.

Watch it now, and see that it was well ahead of its time and now stacks up as extremely introspective: along the lines of 'Alphaville.'

It had Robin Williams and Ray Walston, both famous TeeVee aliens, or so they were known at the time. It was penned by the notoriously ironic, cartoonist Feiffer, someone who specialized in personal social angst. The songs - a major element here - were by the self-destructive genius Nilsson, and directed by Altman when he was interested in social commentary.

All, plus Duvall, were at the height of their powers. Even the quirky Van Dyke Parks appears.

What makes this project so interesting and appealing is that everyone is completely simpatico with Feiffer's Jarryesque vision, which is disconnected from reality and had no cinematic model.

How so many talents could be so adventuresome and coordinated at the same time is a real puzzle.

The bit about how 'large' Bluto is - and how Shelly mentions it - makes me smile every time I recall it. The social text is a bit heavy, but so what?

This is what made Tim Burton possible.

Ted's Evaluation -- 3 of 3: Worth watching.


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