The adventures of the sailor man and his friends in the seaside town of Sweethaven.

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(screenplay), (based on characters by)
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ON DISC
3 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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MacIntyre Dixon ...
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Allan F. Nicholls ...
Rough House (as Allan Nicholls)
Wesley Ivan Hurt ...
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Robert Fortier ...
David McCharen ...
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Storyline

Buff sailor-man Popeye arrives in an awkward seaside town called Sweethaven. There he meets Wimpy, a hamburger-loving man; Olive Oyl, the soon-to-be love of his life; and Bluto, a huge, mean pirate who's out to make Sweethaven pay for no good reason. Popeye also discovers his long-lost Pappy in the middle of it all, so with a band of his new friends, Popeye heads off to stop Bluto, and he's got the power of spinach, which Popeye detests, to butt Bluto right in the mush. Watch as Popeye mops the floor with punks in a burger joint, stops a greedy tax man, takes down a champion boxer, and even finds abandoned baby Swee'pea. He's strong to the finish 'cause he eats his spinach! Written by Dylan Self <robocoptng986127@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Blow me down! It's comink for Chrustmas! See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

12 December 1980 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Popeye - Der Seemann mit dem harten Schlag  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$50,000,000 (USA)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

An international construction crew of 165 worked seven months to construct the set. Tree trunk logs were driven across the European continent from the Netherlands, and wood shingles were imported all the way from Canada. Eight tons (7,257 kilograms) of nails and 2,000 gallons (7,571 liters) of paint were used to complete the set. When they finished, the fictional village of Sweet Haven consisted of 19 buildings, including a hotel, a schoolhouse, a store, a post office, a church, and a tavern. See more »

Goofs

When Olive Oil is being drowned by the octopus, during the end of the movie, her earrings come on and off during the whole scene. See more »

Quotes

Geezil: Fooey! The Commadore. Besides Wimpy, I hate him best.
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Crazy Credits

The closing credits scroll over a scene of Bluto swimming across the ocean. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Mork & Mindy: Pajama Game II (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

Sweethaven
(uncredited)
Music and Lyrics by Harry Nilsson
Performed by the Citizens of Sweet Haven
Reprised by them at the Boxing Match
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User Reviews

 
A fascinating plunge into an the imaginary universe of "Popeye"
8 November 1999 | by (Missouri) – See all my reviews

Robert Altman's "Popeye" is a film to be lauded for its production design and performances. Altman took obvious care in bringing the town of Sweethaven and its residents to life . . . notice the bustling activity, the individual characterizations, and even the big, cartoony special effects (e.g. - Bluto blowing smoke from his ears) that both pay homage to the original "Popeye" and separate it as a new direction for the story.

This well-known story is brought to life by the actors in it, most notably Robin Williams as Popeye and Shelley Duvall as Olive Oyl. Robin Williams, complete with immense forearms and squinting eyes, gruffly plows through his adventures with the same tough sensitivity we've come to love from the character over the years. And Shelley Duvall . . . is simply astounding. She BECOMES Olive Oyl. Her gestures, her speech patterns, her gliding walk . . . it has to be seen! Duvall literally transforms herself into a living cartoon, one we care about more and more as the picture runs its course.

"Popeye" is a great conversion, from the comic strip to cartoon to film. With added depth and atmosphere, it remains an underrated classic appropriate for those willing to be transported by art to a fantasy land far , far away.


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