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The Best Original Screenplay Oscar Winners of the 21st Century Ranked, From ‘Her’ to ‘Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind’

  • Indiewire
The Best Original Screenplay Oscar Winners of the 21st Century Ranked, From ‘Her’ to ‘Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind’
Compare the movies that have won Best Picture at the Academy Awards to those that have taken home Best Original Screenplay and you’ll find that, as often as not, the latter is the more impressive list. Sometimes they overlap, but when they don’t — “Pulp Fiction” and “Forrest Gump,” “Talk to Her” and “Chicago,” “Melvin and Howard” and “Ordinary People” — it almost feels like a tacit admission that the Academy is throwing a bone to the film that’ll be more fondly remembered than the ultimate winner.

It only makes sense, then, that any number of great filmmakers have been honored in this category without ever winning Best Director or Picture: Quentin Tarantino, Sofia Coppola, Spike Jonze. These wordsmiths are worth celebrating, and these are the best — and worst — of them since 2000.

17. “Crash” (2005)

It likely comes as little surprise that Paul Haggis’ surprise Best Picture winner takes last place on this list,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Melvin and Howard’ and the Good Samaritan Nature of Jonathan Demme

Melvin Dummar (Paul Le Mat) is a gambler of sorts, but that is intrinsic to the life of a lower-middle class American. He lives in a trailer, has an estranged wife (Mary Steenburgen, in an Oscar-winning performance), and drives a beaten-up truck whose paint job can only be described as “dirt on rust.” He’s the living epitome of a country music song where a man works 9 to 5 every day only to come home and scratch off lottery tickets in the dream of living in a more prosperous genre of music. Melvin is a bit of a singer as well, and prides himself on his Christmas jingle that he’s sure is going to be a hit someday, cutely titled “Santa’s Souped-up Sleigh.” Melvin debuts the song to a haggard crypt-keeper of a man (Jason Robards) he picked up off the road. Melvin infectiously sings the song, insisting that
See full article at The Film Stage »

Dean Starring Demetri Martin and Kevin Kline Arrives on DVD, Digital HD and On Demand August 29th

The humorous and heartwarming award-winning film, Dean, will arrive on DVD, Digital HD and On Demand August 29 from Lionsgate. Comedian and Emmy® nominee Demetri Martin (2004, Writing for a Variety, Music or Comedy Program, TV’s “Late Night with Conan O’Brien”) stars alongside Academy Award® winner Kevin Kline (1988, Actor in a Supporting Role, A Fish Called Wanda) as a father and son who set out on their own paths to find a new normal following a life-changing event. The film’s all-star cast also includes Gillian Jacobs, Rory Scovel, Ginger Gonzaga, Screen Actors Guild Award® nominee Reid Scott (2012, Ensemble in a Comedy Series, TV’s “Veep”), and Academy Award® winner Mary Steenburgen (1981, Actress in a Supporting Role, Melvin and Howard). Written and directed by Demetri Martin, this comedy about loss, grief and the redemptive power of love won Best Narrative Feature at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival. Including two never-before-seen featurettes
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Paul Thomas Anderson Shares 5 Reasons Why Jonathan Demme Was His Favorite Filmmaker

Paul Thomas Anderson Shares 5 Reasons Why Jonathan Demme Was His Favorite Filmmaker
Programmers at Brooklyn’s BAMcinématek had already been planning Jonathan Demme month when news of his death broke, the comprehensive retrospective of one of American cinema’s most influential voices took on new meaning in the wake of his passing — and brought some of his disciples out of the woodwork. These included Paul Thomas Anderson, who moderated a series of conversations throughout the program’s opening weekend.

The series kicked off with the 1986 slapdash comedy and road movie “Something Wild,” and Anderson was on hand to interview the film’s producer Ed Saxon and SXSW founder Louis Black, a longtime friend of the late director. But it was Anderson, who’s currently in post-production on his December release “Phantom Thread,” who naturally consumed the spotlight. “This is so thrilling for me, and nerve-wracking to be here,” he said by way of introduction, calling himself the “master of ceremony for the weekend.
See full article at Indiewire »

More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals

More 4th of July Escapism: Small-Town Iowa and Declaration of Independence Musicals
(See previous post: Fourth of July Movies: Escapism During a Weird Year.) On the evening of the Fourth of July, besides fireworks, fire hazards, and Yankee Doodle Dandy, if you're watching TCM in the U.S. and Canada, there's the following: Peter H. Hunt's 1776 (1972), a largely forgotten film musical based on the Broadway hit with music by Sherman Edwards. William Daniels, who was recently on TCM talking about 1776 and a couple of other movies (A Thousand Clowns, Dodsworth), has one of the key roles as John Adams. Howard Da Silva, blacklisted for over a decade after being named a communist during the House Un-American Committee hearings of the early 1950s (Robert Taylor was one who mentioned him in his testimony), plays Benjamin Franklin. Ken Howard is Thomas Jefferson, a role he would reprise in John Huston's 1976 short Independence. (In the short, Pat Hingle was cast as John Adams; Eli Wallach was Benjamin Franklin.) Warner
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Melvin And Howard June 16th at Webster University ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’

“No one seems to love or understand me. Oh what hard luck stories they all hand me”

Melvin And Howard screens Friday, June 16th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the third film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

Paul Le Mat is an average Joe named Melvin E. Dummar in Melvin And Howard (1980) an effective combination of drama and comedy from director Jonathan Demme. Melvin often finds it difficult to make ends meet, no matter what line of work he’s in. Then, one day, it seems as if his luck might change. A stranger leaves on his desk a will proclaiming Melvin to be one of 16 heirs to the fortune of reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes. Once upon a time, Melvin had given a lift to an aged, decrepit looking individual (Jason Robards) who claimed to be Hughes. The
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Crazy Mama June 10th at Webster University ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’

Crazy Mama screens Saturday, June 10th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the second film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

A band of beauty shop desperadoes cartoonishly plunder their way from California to Arkansas to reclaim the old family farm in the 1975 hillbilly masterpiece Crazy Mama directed by Jonathan Demme and produced by Roger Corman, who made a whole series of these backwoods desperadoes flicks in the ’70s.

Cloris Leachman stars as Melba Stokes, who runs a beauty parlor in Long Beach, California with her mother Sheba (Ann Sothern) and her daughter Cheryl (Linda Purl). When the shop is repossessed by banker Jim Backus (aka Thurston Howell III in a great little cameo) Melba and the ladies head back to Arkansas and the family farm which was stolen away from them when shea was a girl. Along for the ride is Cheryl’s boyfriend,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Caged Heat Kicks off ‘A Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ June 9th at Webster University

“Even for criminals you’re just a particularly poor reflection on womanhood.”

Caged Heat screens Friday, June 9th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). This is the first film in their ‘Tribute to Jonathan Demme’ The movie starts at 8:00pm.

Who doesn’t love a good Women’s prison film? – Chained Heat, Hellhole, Ilsa She Wolf Of The SS, The Big Bird Cage, The Big Doll House, Reform School Girls, and The Concrete Jungle all sit proudly on my Wip (Women in Prison) DVD shelf. One of the very best of this beloved subgenre is Caged Heat (1974), a wonderful exploitation masterpiece and the directing debut of Oscar-winner Jonathan Demme, that has everything you could possibly hope for in a Women-In-Prison movie: nudity, shower catfights, lesbian coupling, race wars, murder, chain-swinging, switch-blade slashing, and shock therapy!

Chained Heat stars Erica Gavin (of Russ Meyer’s Vixen fame) as Jackie,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Film Feature: HollywoodChicago.com Remembers Jonathan Demme

Chicago – The impact that director Jonathan Demme had on the last couple generations of cinema will live beyond his passing last week, at the age of 73. The Oscar-winning filmmaker also made an impact with the film writers of HollywoodChicago.com – Jon Espino, Patrick McDonald and Spike Walters.

Director Jonathan Demme on the Set of ‘The Silence of the Lambs

Photo credit: 20 Century Fox Home Entertainment

The director was described as “the last of the great humanists” in the HollywoodChicago.com obituary, and followed through on that description with an incredible run of films in the 1980s and ‘90s, which included “Melvin and Howard” (1980), “Something Wild” (1986), “Swimming to Cambodia” (1987), “Married to the Mob” (1988), “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991) and “Philadelphia” (1993). He also created one of the greatest rock documentaries ever, “Stop Making Sense” (1984, featuring the Talking Heads) and worked extensively with Bruce Springsteen and Neil Young on other rock docs. He
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Movie Poster of the Week: The Early Films of Jonathan Demme

We’re all still reeling from the death of Jonathan Demme, one of the most unpredictable, open-hearted and by all accounts best loved of American filmmakers. I was surprised to learn that he was 73 when he died because he, and his films, always seemed so youthful. The fact that his swansong was the beautifully exuberant Justin Timberlake + the Tennessee Kids only added to that impression of vitality.Many of the posters for Demme’s films are as well known as the films themselves: the Dali-esque death’s head moth for Silence of the Lambs; the cutout of Spalding Gray’s head bobbing in a flat plane of blue for Swimming to Cambodia; an upside-down Jeff Daniels on Something Wild; Pablo Ferro’s Strangelove-esque titles over the Big Suit for Stop Making Sense. And of his later films I particularly like the screen-print look of Man From Plains. But the posters for Demme’s early films,
See full article at MUBI »

Film News: Oscar-Winning Director Jonathan Demme Dies at 73

New York City – He was the helmsman of “The Silence of the Lambs,” which won him Best Director and took home Best Picture at the 1992 Academy Awards, and made numerous other late 20th Century movie classics. Director Jonathan Demme died in New York City on April 26, 2017, at the age of 73.

Film writer Dave Kehr called Demme “the last of the great humanists,” and the director followed through on that description with an incredible run of films in the 1980s and ‘90s, which included “Melvin and Howard” (1980), “Something Wild” (1986), “Swimming to Cambodia” (1987), “Married to the Mob” (1988), “Lambs” (1991) and “Philadelphia” (1993). He also created one of the greatest rock documentaries ever, “Stop Making Sense” (1984, featuring the Talking Heads) and worked extensively with Bruce Springsteen and Neil Young on other rock docs. He even directed an episode of the TV classic “Columbo” in 1978, among his other TV achievements.

Director Jonathan Demme on the Set
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Jonathan Demme, Oscar-winning Director, Dead At Age 73

  • CinemaRetro
Jonathan Demme, the personable film director who graduated from making "B"  movies for Roger Corman to the highest ranks of Hollywood filmmakers, has died from cancer at age 73. His remarkable career covered an impressively diverse number of films ranging from documentaries to comedies and thrillers. He won the Oscar for Best Director for his 1991 film "The Silence of the Lambs". His other credits include "Stop Making Sense", "Melvin and Howard", "Philadelphia", "Crazy Mama", "Handle with Care", "Last Embrace", "Something Wild", "Swimming to Cambodia", "Beloved" and the 2004 remake of "The Manchurian Candidate". For more click here. 
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Great Job, Internet!: Read This: David Byrne pens a tribute to his friend Jonathan Demme

Jonathan Demme died today, ending a directorial career that blended music, empathy, and technical artistry with elegance and skill. Despite Demme’s numerous triumphs, few of his films display that cocktail better than his Talking Heads concert film, Stop Taking Sense. Now, Demme’s friend, and Talking Heads frontman, David Byrne, has posted a letter to his personal web site, eulogizing Demme’s humanity and talent.

“I met Jonathan in the ‘80s when Talking Heads were touring a show that he would eventually film and turn into Stop Making Sense,” Byrne writes. “While touring, I thought the show had turned out well and might hold up as a movie, and a mutual friend introduced us. I loved his films Melvin and Howard and Citizens Band (Aka Handle With Care). From those movies alone, one could sense his love of ordinary people. That love surfaces and is manifest over and over
See full article at The AV Club »

Jodie Foster Shares Touching Tribute to Late Director Jonathan Demme: 'He Was Pure Energy'

Jodie Foster Shares Touching Tribute to Late Director Jonathan Demme: 'He Was Pure Energy'
Jodie Foster is paying tribute to legendary director Jonathan Demme following his death on Wednesday.

The actress released a touching statement to media outlets mourning the loss of the groundbreaking filmmaker, and celebrating his impressive life and legacy.

Watch: Jonathan Demme, ‘Silence of the Lambs' and 'Philadelphia' Director, Dies at 73

"I am heart-broken to lose a friend, a mentor, a guy so singular and dynamic you’d have to design a hurricane to contain him," Foster shared. "Jonathan was as quirky as his comedies and as deep as his dramas. He was pure energy, the unstoppable cheerleader for anyone creative. Just as passionate about music as he was about art, he was and will always be a champion of the soul."

"[He was] most beloved, something wild, brother of love, director of the lambs," she continued. "Love that guy. Love him so much."

Foster delivered one of her career-defining performances as rookie FBI Agent Clarice Starling
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Talking Heads Frontman David Byrne Pens Touching Tribute to Jonathan Demme

Talking Heads Frontman David Byrne Pens Touching Tribute to Jonathan Demme
David Byrne paid tribute to Jonathan Demme in a lengthy letter posted Wednesday on his website after the Academy Award-winning director died at the age of 73.

The Talking Heads lead singer and guitarist recounted his experiences with Demme filming the footage that would eventually be turned into “Stop Making Sense,” a now-iconic concert doc shot at Hollywood’s Pantages Theatre. Byrne highlighted how Demme was able to think of the movie as a “theatrical ensemble piece” and reflected on his ability to make the band feel included.

Related

Justin Timberlake Remembers ‘Master of Humanity’ Jonathan Demme

“Jonathan was also incredibly generous during the editing and mixing,” he said. “That inclusion was hugely inspirational for me. Though I had directed music videos before, this mentoring of Jonathan’s emboldened me to try making a feature film.”

With few words to spare for Demme’s more successful films, such as “Silence of the Lambs” and “Philadelphia,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Read David Byrne’s Touching Farewell Letter to Friend and ‘Stop Making Sense’ Director Jonathan Demme

Read David Byrne’s Touching Farewell Letter to Friend and ‘Stop Making Sense’ Director Jonathan Demme
The late filmmaker Jonathan Demme, who died last night at the age of 73, will always be linked to Talking Heads frontman David Byrne. The two likeminded artists first worked together on the 1984 classic “Stop Making Sense,” a concert documentary that Byrne hired Demme to direct, and that collaboration forever transformed what the world thinks possible of such performance-driven films. More than that, the experience sparked a lifelong friendship, one that extended into several other projects and irrevocably deepened the relationship between music and movies.

This afternoon, Byrne wrote a loving remembrance of Demme on his website. We have reposted the full text of Byrne’s letter below.

Read More: Remembering Jonathan Demme: Why He Was One Of The Great Filmmakers Of Our Time

My friend, the director Jonathan Demme, passed last night.

I met Jonathan in the ‘80s when Talking Heads were touring a show that he would eventually
See full article at Indiewire »

Jonathan Demme Appreciation: A Filmmaker Who Turned His Humanity Into Art

Jonathan Demme Appreciation: A Filmmaker Who Turned His Humanity Into Art
The great filmmakers who came to prominence in the 1970s — and Jonathan Demme, who died Wednesday, was one of them — had stylistic traits that made them iconically identifiable. Robert Altman had his multi-character hubbub, Martin Scorsese had his volcanic rock ‘n’ roll virtuosity, and Francis Ford Coppola had his lavishly scaled operatic grandeur. But Demme, vivid and stirring as his filmmaking voice was, had no such obvious signature. You could almost say that he was defined by his lack of signature.

What defined a Demme film was the open-eyed flow of its humanity, the way his camera drank in everyone on screen — it didn’t matter whether the character was a goofy truck driver, a derelict billionaire, the troubled wife of a mobster, a new wave rock ‘n’ roller, or a serial killer — and took the full measure of their life and spirit. For Demme, the magic of movies resided
See full article at Variety - Film News »

David Byrne Remembers 'Incredibly Generous' Jonathan Demme

David Byrne Remembers 'Incredibly Generous' Jonathan Demme
David Byrne, who collaborated with director Jonathan Demme multiple times, most notably on the famous Talking Heads concert film Stop Making Sense, remembered the director on Wednesday with a post on his website. Demme died early this morning at age 73 from esophageal cancer. 

Byrne praised Demme for his "focus on character, his love of ordinary people, [which] made the movies something different and special." Byrne also commended the filmmaker for his musical enthusiasm and ability to "slip a reggae artist's song or a Haitian recording into a narrative film in ways
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Peter Travers on Jonathan Demme: The Movies' Great Humanist

Peter Travers on Jonathan Demme: The Movies' Great Humanist
Jonathan Demme, dead of cancer at 73. It's hard to take in those words.

Or to stop feeling the gut punch of his loss. High praise will flow, deservedly, about Demme's virtuosity as a filmmaker; about the Oscars he won for The Silence of the Lambs; about his concert films, from Stop Making Sense to Justin Timberlake + The Tennessee Kids, that brought audiences closer than ever before to the sweaty intimacy and creative pulse of music. His influence is everywhere. Paul Thomas Anderson was once asked for a list of the
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Oscar-Winning Director Jonathan Demme Passes Away at 73

Oscar-Winning Director Jonathan Demme Passes Away at 73
Director Jonathan Demme, who won an Oscar for directing the 1991 Best Picture winner The Silence of the Lambs, has passed away earlier this morning at the age of 74. According to a source close to the family, the filmmaker passed from esophageal cancer and complications from heart disease. The filmmaker had been treated for esophageal cancer in 2010, and while he did recover, the cancer came back in 2015, and sources said his condition had deteriorated in recent weeks. We have assembled a number of tweets below from filmmakers and actors paying their respects to this iconic director.

IndieWire first broke the news this morning, as tributes have started to flood in from filmmakers such as Edgar Wright, James Wan and actors such as Denis Leary, Michael Chiklis and many more. Jonathan Demme was born February 22, 1944 in Baldwin, Nassau County, New York to Dorothy Louise (Rogers) and Robert Eugene Demme, a public relations executive.
See full article at MovieWeb »
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