Kagemusha
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
Kagemusha (1980) More at IMDbPro »


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

16 items from 2010


Seven Samurai Criterion Blu-ray Review

21 October 2010 7:45 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

For years now Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai has been ranked as one of the best movies ever made, and is usually considered one of the finest achievement in cinema. In the most recent Sight and Sound poll of the best films ever made, critics ranked it eleventh (its highest charting was in 1982 at #3) while filmmakers ranked it ninth. It’s ranked thirteenth on IMDb.com’s list of the greatest films of all time. Ain’t no denying that Kurosawa and his cast (including Toshiro Mifune) made a masterwork. And my review of The Criterion collection’s Seven Samurai after the jump.

A band of marauding Ronin spot a village and are about to raid it when their leader notes that the village’s crops won’t be ready for another couple of weeks. They ride off, but a villager hears their plans. After a discussion, the villagers decide »

- Andre Dellamorte

Permalink | Report a problem


Ran: No 12

19 October 2010 3:43 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Akira Kurosawa, 1985

Kurosawa's last great film was made after many years in the wilderness. His star had fallen in Japan after a period of extraordinary artistic fertility ended in the mid-60s. His eyesight was failing; he'd attempted suicide. In 1980, he returned to favour with Kagemusha, which was seen as a rehearsal for his long-planned adaptation of King Lear. Ran finally appeared in 1985, and in its portrait of a great man who has lost control of his offices of power, critics were quick to read the experiences of the director himself.

Appropriating Lear gave Kurosawa scope to meditate on man's diminishing through age, but, in so doing, he produced, at 75, a film of breath­taking power and scale, and one of the most visually arresting war films ever made. The title translates as "chaos", and this is what erupts when Hidetora (Tatsuya Nakadai), the patriarch of the Ichimonji clan, attempts »

- Killian Fox

Permalink | Report a problem


Ran: No 12 best action and war film of all time

19 October 2010 3:43 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Akira Kurosawa, 1985

Kurosawa's last great film was made after many years in the wilderness. His star had fallen in Japan after a period of extraordinary artistic fertility ended in the mid-60s. His eyesight was failing; he'd attempted suicide. In 1980, he returned to favour with Kagemusha, which was seen as a rehearsal for his long-planned adaptation of King Lear. Ran finally appeared in 1985, and in its portrait of a great man who has lost control of his offices of power, critics were quick to read the experiences of the director himself.

Appropriating Lear gave Kurosawa scope to meditate on man's diminishing through age, but, in so doing, he produced, at 75, a film of breath­taking power and scale, and one of the most visually arresting war films ever made. The title translates as "chaos", and this is what erupts when Hidetora (Tatsuya Nakadai), the patriarch of the Ichimonji clan, »

- Killian Fox

Permalink | Report a problem


DVD Review: The First Films of Akira Kurosawa (Criterion Collection)

3 August 2010 1:44 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Over the last few years my interest in Akira Kurosawa has grown and grown, but it isn't as if I have been familiar with his work for all that long. It wasn't until August 25, 2007 that I saw my first Kurosawa film, and just as I assume to be the same for many before and after me, that film was Seven Samurai. I enjoyed it and began my exploration into Kurosawa using that film as my starting point. Since that day in August I have seen twelve more of Kurosawa's features and with Criterion's recent Eclipse release titled "The First Films of Akira Kurosawa" I have added four more to that tally.

This was my first time watching one of Criterion's Eclipse releases, which seem to primarily dedicate themselves to ensuring lesser known films from well known directors never die, and while they don't get the full Criterion treatment they will live on. »

- Brad Brevet

Permalink | Report a problem


The Criterion Column: October Brings Kubrick's Paths Of Glory, The Seven Samurai on Blu-Ray, Ingmar Bergman, House, and More

17 July 2010 7:22 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

The October 2010 batch of Criterion titles brings a few surprises. Stanley Kubrick's Paths of Glory is hitting DVD and Blu-Ray as is Ingmar Bergman's film The Magician. Criterion continues its relationship with Wes Anderson by releasing The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-Ray and DVD. Ok.

Akira Kurosawa's The Seven Samurai is headed for Blu-Ray with a new restored high-def transfer. If the quality of Criterion's other Kurosawa Blu-Ray discs (e.g. Kagemusha, Sanjuro and Yojimbo) are any indication, it is time to ditch the DVDs. This one should look spectacular.

Finally, Nobuhiko Obayashi's House is making its way to Blu-Ray and DVD just in time for Halloween. There are a few things to note here. First, the fact that Criterion is releasing this on Blu-Ray with a restored transfer and uncompressed mono sound is kind of a surprise. This is a very good thing. The other curious thing is the extras. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Akira Kurosawa’s Ran Slashes It’s Way Onto Hulu

12 July 2010 10:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

With TV being their go to medium, Hulu is slowly making a name for itself with the feature films that it is slowly releasing to their platform.

Films like Charade (the new Blu-ray is set to be released from Criterion this Sepember) have found a home on the website (as well as Netflix Watch Instantly), and now it appears as though the group have outdone themselves. Thanks to Hulu, Akira Kurosawa’s legendary film, Ran, which has gone out of print through Criterion, and recently re-released on Blu-ray through Studio Canal and Lionsgate, is now available to watch for free on the website.

Like most of Kurosawa’s canon, Ran is an absolute masterpiece that is Kurosawa’s take on the tale of King Lear. It follows three sons who must not only find peace in a world torn apart by war, but one brother must also deal with the »

- Joshua Brunsting

Permalink | Report a problem


Celebrating Akira Kurosawa at 100

2 July 2010 11:00 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998) was one of the greatest filmmakers of all-time and yet, I’d bet most people have never even heard of him. That’s a shame, because his long and extremely accomplished career has produced some of the most beautiful, most influential films the world has ever seen. Viewing, no… experiencing Kurosawa films such as Rashoman, Ikiru, Ran or Throne Of Blood are simply a necessity of life, something that must be done before one dies. Period.

Filmmakers across the globe have drawn endless inspiration from Kurosawa’s work, including the Hollywood remake of Seven Samurai (The Magnificent Seven), the spaghetti western remake Yojimbo (Fistful Of Dollars) by Italian filmmaker Sergio Leone and even George Lucas himself has cited Kurosawa’s The Hidden Fortress as the inspiration for his creating C3PO and R2-D2.

So, with such a powerhouse of cinematic prowess and one of my top 3 favorite filmmakers of all-time, »

- Travis Keune

Permalink | Report a problem


Top Ten: Oscar's Favorite Foreign Filmmakers

31 May 2010 8:04 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

tuesday top ten returns! It's for the list-maker in me and the list-lover in you

The Cannes film festival wrapped this weekend (previous posts) and the most recent Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film, The Secret in Their Eyes is still in the midst of a successful Us run. That Oscar winning Argentinian film came to us from director Juan Jose Campanella. It's his second film to be honored by the Academy (Son of the Bride was nominated ten years back). The Academy voters obviously like Campanella and in some ways he's a Hollywood guy. When he's not directing Argentinian Oscar hopefuls he spends time making Us television with episodes of Law & Order, House and 30 Rock under his belt.

So let's talk foreign-language auteurs. Who does Oscar love most?

[The film titles discussed in this article will link to Netflix pages -- if available -- should you be curious to see the films]

Best Director winners Ang Lee (Brokeback Mountain) and Milos Forman

(Amadeus and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest)

Please Note: »

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


Tiff Cinematheque To Screen Several Criterion Films This Summer

25 May 2010 9:25 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

To celebrate its 20th Anniversary, it appears as though the Tiff Cinematheque is set to pull out all the stops.

According to Criterion, the Tiff, formerly known as the Cinematheque Ontario, will be bringing out a rather superb and cartoonishly awesome summer schedule, that will include films ranging from Kurosawa pieces, to films from Pier Paolo Pasolini. Other films include a month long series dedicated to James Mason, Eric Rohmer’s Six Moral Tales, a tribute to Robin Wood, and most interesting, a retrospective on the works of one Catherine Breillat.

Personally, while the Kurosawa, Pasolini, and Rohmer collections sound amazing, the Breillat series is ultimately the collective that I am most interested in. Ranging from films like the brilliant Fat Girl, to the superb and underrated Anatomy of Hell, these are some of the most interesting and under seen pieces of cinema of recent memory, and are more than »

- Joshua Brunsting

Permalink | Report a problem


American Cinematheque And UCLA Team Up For Akira Kurosawa Screening Series

13 May 2010 9:48 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

With Akira Kurosawa’s 100th birthday just a few months behind us, the celebration of not only the man, but his stunning filmography is still going strong.

Los Angeles readers better be prepared, as Friday is the kick off of a special two-part Akira Kurosawa Centennial Film Festival, brought together by the American Cinematheque and UCLA’s Film & Television Archive.

Part 1 of this festival kicks off Friday, and runs until May 23, and will feature screenings of Rashomon, The Seven Samurai, Ran, Dodes’Ka-Den, Stray Dog, High And Low, Kagemusha, Hidden Fortress, Yojimbo, Sanjuro, and I Live In Fear, all of which are currently available on the Criterion Collection.

This would be a must see for any and all film fans and cinephile, however, at prices of $11.00 for the general public, $9.00 for students and seniors, and $7.00 for members of the American Cinematheque, you really cannot go wrong here. It has been »

- Joshua Brunsting

Permalink | Report a problem


The East has promise at Cannes

4 May 2010 9:00 AM, PDT | TotalFilm | See recent TotalFilm news »

  Five out of the eighteen films vying for this year's prestigious Palme d"Or award hail from Asia. Eastern cinema has a solid track record of success at Cannes, with previous winners including Akira Kurosawa's Kagemusha and Chen Kaige's Farewell, My Concubine.  Japanese favourite Takeshi Kitano returns to the gangster genre with his violent latest Outrage, while previous jury prize winner Apichatpong Weerasethakul  directs spiritual comedy Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. This year's Cannes Film...

. »

- Emma Dibdin

Permalink | Report a problem


Akira Kurosawa’s Ran, Dersu Uzala, Kagemusha on TCM

30 March 2010 2:53 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Maksim Munzuk Dersu Uzala Three Academy Award-nominated/-winning films by Akira Kurosawa will be shown tonight on Turner Classic Movies: Dersu Uzala (1975), Kagemusha (1980), and Ran (1985). Winner of the 1975 Best Foreign Language Film Oscar, the poetic Dersu Uzala chronicles the difficulties encountered by a Siberian hunter (Maksim Munzuk) who’s brought to civilization by a Russian explorer whose life the hunter had saved. Based on a real-life story, Dersu Uzala was Kurosawa’s first film following his suicide attempt in the early ’70s. In Kagemusha, a thief impersonates a powerful — but deceased — warlord. Kagemusha was nominated for Best Art Direction and Best Foreign Language Film Oscars. Additionally, Kurosawa’s epic shared the Palme d’Or with Bob Fosse’s All That Jazz. Ran is [...] »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Akira Kurosawa TCM Tribute

9 March 2010 2:03 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

The Academy had its John Hughes tribute on Sunday. Tonight, Turner Classic Movies is paying tribute to someone who may not be a household name in the United States, but who merits recognition as well. The guy, after all, made quite a few films that won awards here and there even though they were mostly in black and white, and didn’t star Rob Lowe, Macauley Culkin, or Demi Moore. Does Rashomon ring a bell? Seven Samurai? Yojimbo? Ran? Kagemusha? Dersu Uzala? Akira Kurosawa — believe it or not, I actually have a photo of myself standing right next to him — will be honored tonight on TCM. Four of the director’s films will be shown, including the little-known Hakuchi, [...] »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


Akira Kurosawa @ 100: Sffs

3 March 2010 9:15 PM, PST | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

My thanks to Executive Director Graham Leggat and Creative Director Miguel Pendás of the San Francisco Film Society (Sffs) for reminding me just how valuable a resource the Sffs History Project can be. Still keyed into the centennial celebration of Akira Kurosawa's birthday, Sffs forwarded an article by Miguel Pendás recounting Kurosawa's October 1980 appearance at the San Francisco International Film Festival for the screening of his Palme d'Or winning film Kagemusha. "Eight taiko drummers pounded out a welcome," Pendás recalled, "and Akira Kurosawa stepped up on the stage, tall, slim, elegant and, as always, hidden behind dark glasses. Francis Ford Coppola and George Lucas, who had helped him finance his latest film, Kagemusha, joined him on stage. A full house at the Palace of Fine Arts theater rose to its feet and gave the threesome a lengthy standing ovation."

 

»

Permalink | Report a problem


DVD Preview: Kurosawa 100th Birthday Criterion Box Set

3 March 2010 3:35 PM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

My first introduction to Kurosawa and also to Japanese cinema in general was one rainy Sunday afternoon when I was around ten years old and I watched Rashomon. This film was a revelation and the experience remains a defining film memory.

This led me to get more and more interested in cinema and in particular foreign language films. My first experience of Kurosawa and the impact it had is not unique, as the Criterion Collection’s recent competition highlights, and it is the timelessness of Kurosawa’s films that has guaranteed that they will inspire and influence film fans for many more years to come.

Kurosawa’s films are important and influential in not just Japanese cinema but cinema in general. Many of his films are classics and they have heavily influenced filmmakers for over fifty years. Many of Kurosawa’s films have been remade or reworked resulting in many »

- Craig Skinner

Permalink | Report a problem


Mark Your Calendar! Kurosawa Fest

23 February 2010 11:18 PM, PST | JustPressPlay.net | See recent JustPressPlay news »

He may not have lived to see 100, but his films will see 1000 and beyond.

This coming 23rd of March would have been Akira Kurosawa's 100th birthday. The master died in 1998, but his films continue to fascinate and enthrall entire generations of people who may not have even heard of him until after his death. Should you find yourself realizing that you haven't seen enough from Kurosawa's filmography, you're in luck—Turner Classic Movies is planning a hell of a centennial.

For the month of March beginning the 9th, TCM will air five of Kurosawa's films every Tuesday, with a 24-hour marathon on his birthday. 26 films in total are involved, which covers nearly all of Akira Kurosawa's body of work. 25, technically, since Sanshiro Sugata is split into two parts.

Yes, these are the same 25 movies in Criterion's Ak 100 DVD box set released back in December. You can buy that »

- Arya Ponto

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

16 items from 2010


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners