7.3/10
835
9 user 4 critic

Gideon's Trumpet (1980)

Not Rated | | Biography, Drama, History | TV Movie 30 April 1980
The story of Clarence Earl Gideon and his fight for the right to have publicly funded legal counsel for the needy.

Director:

(as Robert Collins)

Writers:

(book), (teleplay)
Reviews

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Nominated for 3 Primetime Emmys. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Clarence Earl Gideon
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Chief Justice / Offscreen Narrator
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Edna Curtis
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1st Supreme Court Justice
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Sixth Supreme Court Justice
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Jacob
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5th Supreme Court Justice
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Fred Turner
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Judge Robert McCrary
Dolph Sweet ...
Charlie
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2nd Supreme Court Justice
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Abe Krash
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Harris
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Bobby Earle
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Storyline

True story of Clarence Gideon's fight to be appointed counsel at the expense of the state. This landmark case led to the Supreme Court's decision which extended this right to all criminal defendants. Written by Steve Walker <swalker@ionet.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

30 April 1980 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Hallmark Hall of Fame: Gideon's Trumpet (#29.3)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

John Houseman's character is never identified by name, but historically, the Chief Justice at that time (1961) was Earl Warren. See more »

Goofs

In the first trial, when the bailiff is swearing in Lester Wade, he instructs him to "raise your right hand" [the audio of this is clipped]. However, Lester actually places his right hand on the bible and raises his left hand. On all other occasions in the movie, witnesses actually raise their right hands (and put their left hands on the bible) when being sworn in. See more »

Quotes

James Fitzpatrick: [referring to Jacob, who is about to argue before the Supreme Court for the very first time] Don't go feeling sorry for the poor son-of-a-bitch until we've won.
See more »

Connections

Edited into Hallmark Hall of Fame (1951) See more »

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User Reviews

Interesting.
18 September 1999 | by (Sterling Heights, Michigan) – See all my reviews

I wouldn't define this movie as being great. It was good, but not great. It was interesting though. I had to watch this for my criminal justice class, and I was riveted to it. I learned a lot about how our courts worked and how reforms in them were made so people who couldn't afford an attorney still had the right to have one. Based on a true story, Clarence Gideon was convicted of a crime he did not commit. But the movie centers around how he was deprived of his right to an attorney, and how he fought in prison to make clear that he did not have a fair trial. I thought it was well done, and Henry Fonda was very good in the role of Clarence Gideon. Only drawback, this should have been released in theaters. The camerawork of the courtroom and the long shots of Clarence Gideon confessing his history are great. The opening shot is the best scene of the film, which is seen in it's entireity later. Henry Fonda looks right into the camera, right at you, and as Clarence Gideon, he gives you his background. Ingenious. I wish there could be more movies with scenes as subtle and as profound as this. The other scene I liked was when Gideon is retried with an experienced lawyer, and when the first witness falsely claims Clarence Gideon is the culprit, the lawyer cuts him down with words and facts. This movie is good, but it's not a monumental achievement. I would highly recommend it to you though. It's got the qualities a good film should have: a good story and good acting. And lawyers or people involved in law alike will find it very interesting.


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