IMDb > Forbidden Zone (1980)
Forbidden Zone
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Forbidden Zone (1980) More at IMDbPro »

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Forbidden Zone -- Trailer for Forbidden Zone

Overview

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Director:
Writers:
Richard Elfman (story)
Richard Elfman (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Forbidden Zone on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
21 March 1980 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A chaotic musical fantasy.
Plot:
The bizarre and musical tale of a girl who travels to another dimension through the gateway found in her family's basement. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Awards:
1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(65 articles)
User Reviews:
Merry Lunacy See more (88 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Hervé Villechaize ... King Fausto of the Sixth Dimension

Susan Tyrrell ... Queen Doris of the Sixth Dimension / Ruth Henderson
Gisele Lindley ... The Princess
Jan Stuart Schwartz ... Bust Rod, the Servant Frog
Marie-Pascale Elfman ... Susan B. 'Frenchy' Hercules
Virginia Rose ... Ma Hercules
Gene Cunningham ... Huckleberry P. Jones / Pa Hercules (as Ugh-Fudge Bwana)
Phil Gordon ... Flash Hercules
Hyman Diamond ... Grampa Hercules
Matthew Bright ... Squeezit & René Henderson (as Toshiro Boloney)

Danny Elfman ... Satan

Viva ... Ex-Queen
Joe Spinell ... Squeezit's Father
Brian Routh ... Harry Kipper (as The Kipper Kids)
Martin von Haselberg ... Harry Kipper (as The Kipper Kids)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Carmen Angelo ... Featured dancer
Rosilyn Aronson ... First Teasing Girl
Hilary Beane ... Sexy Student
Sugar Bear ... Gunfighting Student, Johnny

Brenda Bernstein ... Featured dancer
Herman Bernstein ... Mr. Bernstein, the Old Yiddish Man
James Bordus ... Gunshot Victim
Bobbi Botton ... Featured dancer
Susan Bridges ... Featured dancer
Albert Brokhim ... Court Trumpeter
Kyra Campinsky ... Featured dancer
Darlene Cloutier ... Featured dancer
Lisa Cloutier ... Featured dancer
Kathleen Conklin ... Featured dancer
Ken Corrone ... Giant Prisoner
Kerry Ann Covey ... Featured dancer
Rosilyn Crinion ... Second Teasing Girl

Richard Elfman ... Masseuse, prisoner
David Erikson ... Giant Prisoner
Christine Fulbright ... Featured dancer
Nela Gary ... Featured dancer
Sydney Haupert ... Featured dancer
Nancy Hoffer ... Featured dancer
Nicholas James ... The Pope
Jennifer Laute ... Featured dancer
Dawn McErrick ... Featured dancer
Mike Morris ... Featured dancer
Joe Munro ... Marching Demon
Dennis Olivieri ... Stuttering Student
Gregg Pope ... Student Dance Soloist
Redonte Reola ... Small Student
Brenda Star ... Sexy Student
Nathan Stelzer ... Featured dancer
Kedric Wolfe ... Human Chandelier / Miss Feldman, the School Teacher

Jan Munroe ... The Headsman (uncredited)

Directed by
Richard Elfman 
 
Writing credits
Richard Elfman (story)

Richard Elfman (screenplay) &
Matthew Bright (screenplay) &
Nick L. Martinson (screenplay) &
Nicholas James (screenplay) (as Nick James)

Produced by
Gene Cunningham .... executive producer
Judith Faye Elfman .... assistant producer
Richard Elfman .... producer
Nicholas James .... co-producer (as Nick James)
Martin Nicholson .... associate producer (as Martin W. Nicholson)
Marie-Pascale Elfman .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Danny Elfman 
 
Cinematography by
Gregory Sandor 
 
Film Editing by
Martin Nicholson  (as Martin W. Nicholson)
Nicholas James (uncredited)
 
Production Design by
Marie-Pascale Elfman 
 
Art Direction by
David M. Mackler 
 
Makeup Department
Chris Brice .... makeup artist
T. Farrell .... assistant makeup artist
Julie Johnson .... makeup artist
C. Larrieu .... assistant makeup artist
G. Larsson .... assistant makeup artist
Vicky Ogden .... assistant makeup artist (as V. Ogden)
B. Russell .... assistant makeup artist
 
Production Management
Bill Baker .... production manager
Mark Kitchell .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Michael Frumkin .... second assistant director
Larry Markart .... second assistant director
Martin Nicholson .... first assistant director (as Martin W. Nicholson)
Stephen Sassen .... additional assistant director (as Steve Sassen)
 
Art Department
Ken Corrone .... set designer
David Erickson .... set constructor
Phil Gale .... set constructor
Robert Kaiser .... set constructor
Marie Kordus .... property mistress
Cheri Paul .... assistant props (as C. Paul)
Tom Sewell .... design consultant
John Van Hamersveld .... graphic consultant (as John Van Hammersveld)
Salvador Viento .... construction supervisor
Cathy Walters .... storyboard artist (as Kathy Walters)
Rebecca Wilson .... title artist
Michael Wolf .... assistant props (as M. Wolfe)
Zox .... graphic consultant
 
Sound Department
Jan Brodin .... sound recordist
Angie Carter .... boom operator
Robert Grieve .... foley artist
Laja Holland .... foley artist
Laja Holland .... sound editor
Gerald B. Wolfe .... sound recordist (as Jerry Wolfe)
Gary Alexander .... sound re-recording mixer (uncredited)
Ken Dufva .... foley artist (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Conrad Rothmann .... special effects rigging and explosion (as Conrad Rothman)
 
Visual Effects by
Larry Bagley .... opticals: MGM Optical Dept.
Frederick Langenbach .... opticals: MGM Optical Dept. (as Fred Langenbach)
James F. Liles .... opticals: MGM Optical Dept.
Tate Smith .... opticals: MGM Optical Dept.
William J. Tomkin .... opticals: MGM Optical Dept. (as William Tompkin)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Garo Barsumian .... best boy
Annette Buehre .... animation camera: Opticam Inc.
Jan Buehre .... animation camera: Opticam Inc.
Lee Grover .... second assistant camera
Alex Hakobian .... gaffer (as Alex Hakubian)
Ron Kaufman .... second grip
Lazlo Mecs .... additional camera operator
Lazlo Mecs .... first assistant camera
John O'Connell .... animation camera: Lumeni Productions
John Sprung .... dolly grip
Thomas Thonson .... key grip
William J. Tomkin .... animation camera: MGM (as William Tompkin)
Tony Valdez .... animation camera: Lumeni Productions
Jürg V. Walther .... key grip (as Jurg Walther)
Hugh Washburn .... second electrician
Guy Webster .... still photographer: animation
Gilbert Yablon .... animation camera: Lumeni Productions
Brian MacDougall .... additional cinematography (uncredited)
 
Animation Department
James P. Alles .... animation assistant (as J. Alles)
M. Davis .... animation assistant
Philomena Gusson .... animation assistant (as Philomena)
John Muto .... animator: animated sequences
John Nelson .... animation assistant (as J. Nelson)
Mitchel C. Resnick .... animator (as M. Resnick)
J. Satriani .... animation assistant
Jim Shaw .... animation assistant (as J. Shaw)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Pat Hurt .... costume mistress
Bonnie Leitch .... costume mistress
Darlene Pratt .... seamstress
Leon Schneiderman .... frog costume
Erica Ueland .... assistant costume mistress
 
Editorial Department
Patricia Summers .... assistant editor
Dennis Michelson .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
James Ackley .... music recordist: Backroom Recorders (as Jim Ackley)
Steve Bartek .... music arranger
Michael Boshears .... music recordist: Spectrum Studios
Loren-Paul Caplin .... musical director
Danny Elfman .... music arranger
Brad Kay .... musicologist
Ken Maytag .... music recordist: Redhouse Recording Studio
Oingo Boingo .... music performers (as The Oingo-Boingo)
Robert Randles .... music supervisor
 
Other crew
G. Bassin .... production assistant
Fred J. Blome .... production assistant (as F. Blome)
Carl Borack .... presenter
Maureen Byrne .... additional dance sequences
Richard Charles Greenbaum .... production assistant (as R. Greenbaum)
S. Jackson .... production assistant
Vinita McClellon .... script supervisor
J.F. Oya .... sales agent
D. Perez .... production assistant
Roger Sassen .... production assistant (as R. Sassen)
Janet Schipper .... photo finishing
S. Simon .... production assistant
Brenda Weisman .... script supervisor
Lonnie Wittenberg .... production assistant (as L. Wittenburg)
Carol Zeitz .... choreographer
 
Thanks
Jack Pill .... special thanks
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
USA:74 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The headlines on Pa's newspapers are: - Man Bites Dog Then Bites Self - French Girl Missing, Strange Circumstances. - Two More Missing, Similar Circumstances.See more »
Quotes:
Pa Hercules:You leave me be. In the real world up there, I was just another rat. And down here, I also live like a rat. So what's the difference? Go away. I want to be alone.
Flash:Ah, banana oil.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Night of the Comet (1984)See more »
Soundtrack:
PleureSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
34 out of 39 people found the following review useful.
Merry Lunacy, 4 August 2006
Author: TonyDood from United States

I avoided this film for years even though I seek out movies that appear to have been created by people with "unstable" minds (Jodorowsky, Ken Russell, Lynch and Jess Franco). The problem was the box cover art. The cartoon of Susan Tyrrell is so lurid and 80's it was really off-putting. And the promise of "offensive" humor made it sound like a low-rent John Waters movie. I've gone beyond "it's fun to be shocked" movies and demand some quality.

How surprised I was when I finally gambled on this one! I had seen the last minutes on IFC or some cable station late one night while flipping channels. My first thoughts were probably like anyone's would be..."What. The. Hell?" There was "Tattoo" from "Fantasy Island," a bunch of tap-dancing bimbettes, dice, a French woman, a guy in drag, two bald-headed freaks in their jockstraps...and a guy in a gorilla suit (with a bra on, no less!) All jumping around singing, "The Forbidden Zone!" like they had drank about 6 quarts of caffeine! The image rivaled Fellini!

I finally rented the beautifully re-mastered DVD after still more concern about just what this movie WAS exactly. I was absolutely riveted for the entire running time. I can't think of a single movie in history like this one, and I've seen some real corkers! The opening musical number, using an old recording of the song "Some Of These Days" as a background track, is eye-poppingly brilliant. I still don't know how it was done, certainly not with the skills and technology of a low-budget filmmaker in 1980. But it speaks to me on an unconscious level, dark and brooding yet fanciful and jolly (the slick dancing butler who appears out of nowhere is one of the most delightfully ridiculous and satisfying surreal moments I've seen in years). I was very skeptical that the momentum and creativity could be sustained, and it never did reach that peak again (although the "Pico And Sepulveda," "Witche's Egg" and Alphabet numbers come close), but it couldn't have...I don't think it IS possible to sustain that level forever, it would drive the viewer away.

The plot, involving a family discovering a door that leads to the 6th dimension where a queen and king (the unbelievably game Ms. Tyrrell who deserves an award of some kind for her brave and perfect-pitch performance, and the charming Herve, who she was apparently dating at the time?), is absolutely superfluous, merely an excuse for the music and visuals, and I'd have it no other way personally. It's like "Alice In Wonderland." Any adaption that tries to assign a "story" to the proceedings has missed the point entirely; like a dream, there is an internal logic...but the rules and boundaries of reality are not welcome!

The film is creaky in places, of course...it shows it's no-budget roots frequently, the pace is so hectic as to be head-ache inducing in certain parts and most dismaying of all is the constant interruption of lewdness just for the sake of lewdness, as if the filmmaker's were all horny teens who wanted to get as much naughty sex and dirty humor in as possible (Hint: the probably were!) The acting is by-and-large, with the exception of the foul-mouthed, shrieking, Disney-queen-from-hell Ms. Tyrell, pretty amateurish, even though everyone throws themselves into the production full-force (the screen writer bravely spends the whole film running around in his underpants!) But what it lacks in maturity it makes up for in execution. I kept sitting there shaking my head...these are real dancers, the choreography is wonderful, the animation and effects are stunning...and you can't ignore the score!

I don't know how much tinkering has gone on with this re-master, but the things that Danny Elfman was doing with the film score, weaving it in and out with old 30's recordings and New Wave stylings, as well as his more familiar ska style of the 80's...it's just breathtaking. If you are any sort of fan of Elfman's work, soundtrack or otherwise, you probably already have this music. If you're still new to it as I was, you'll become an instant fan. You cannot deny it, Elfman is a genius.

Like anything that seems completely nonsensical at first (example, Fellini's Satyricon), a lot of things in this film probably make more sense the more you delve into it. The DVD features explain that the "tone" of the film is an attempt to capture the live performance style of Elfman and his early "Oingo Boingo" incarnation, as a theatrical troupe. There's the obvious reference to Fleischer/Betty Boop cartoons that don't get seen much anymore. I have no idea who "The Kipper Kids" were but I assume audiences at the time would have recognized them. Certainly Herve was recognizable, if hardly comforting, in the weird world of this film.

I take a great deal of comfort in knowing that the man at the helm of this film, Danny Elfman's brother, admits that he was not inspired to make this movie by the use of any drugs. All too often in today's world we are prone to assume that the only way someone can come up with something genuinely original, creative and surreal is to assume that chemicals are responsible. Certainly I can imagine the experience of watching this film in an altered state of mind would be a "trip." However, hats off to people who find and appreciate the merry lunacy and joyfully insane magic that can be found in the every day world...if you care to look! I'm sorry that the film didn't take the director anywhere, but not surprised...it's not something I would easily recommend to just anyone...but I'm glad Elfman seems to have enjoyed a revival of his project, and is getting some recognition

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The Dereliks review Forbidden Zone DerelikFilms
So trippy! VillechaizeLove
A Surrealist Masterwork! kb-70
Help Richard Elfman Make Forbidden Zone 2 mongoose_mania
Help with Lyrics daniosh
Pig Latin translation? arronbergstrom
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