IMDb > The Last Metro (1980)
Le dernier métro
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The Last Metro (1980) More at IMDbPro »Le dernier métro (original title)

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Overview

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Director:
Writers:
François Truffaut (scenario) &
Suzanne Schiffman (scenario) ...
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Contact:
View company contact information for The Last Metro on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
19 February 1981 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A story of love and conflict.
Plot:
In occupied Paris, an actress married to a Jewish theater owner must keep him hidden from the Nazis while doing both of their jobs. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 13 wins & 4 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
One from Les Films du Carrosse See more (34 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Catherine Deneuve ... Marion Steiner

Gérard Depardieu ... Bernard Granger
Jean Poiret ... Jean-Loup Cottins
Andréa Ferréol ... Arlette Guillaume
Paulette Dubost ... Germaine Fabre
Jean-Louis Richard ... Daxiat
Maurice Risch ... Raymond Boursier
Sabine Haudepin ... Nadine Marsac
Heinz Bennent ... Lucas Steiner
Christian Baltauss ... Bernard's Replacement
Pierre Belot ... Desk Clerk
René Dupré ... Valentin
Aude Loring
Alain Tasma ... Marc
Rose Thiéry ... Jacquot's Mother / Concierge (as Rose Thierry)
Jacob Weizbluth ... Rosen
Jean-Pierre Klein ... Christian Leglise
Renata Flores ... Greta Borg (as Rénata)
Marcel Berbert ... Merlin
Hénia Suchar ... Yvonne the Chambermaid (as Hénia Ziv)
László Szabó ... Lieutnant Bergen (as Laszlo Szabo)
Martine Simonet ... Martine, the thief
Jean-José Richer ... Rene Bernardini
Jessica Zucman ... Rosette Goldstern

Richard Bohringer ... Gestapo Officer
Franck Pasquier ... Jacquôt (as Le petit Franck Pasquier)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Alexandre Aumont ... 1st Nurse (uncredited)
Marie-Dominique Henry ... (uncredited)
Philippe Vesque ... (uncredited)
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Directed by
François Truffaut 
 
Writing credits
François Truffaut (scenario) &
Suzanne Schiffman (scenario)

François Truffaut (dialogue) &
Suzanne Schiffman (dialogue) and
Jean-Claude Grumberg (dialogue)

Produced by
François Truffaut .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Georges Delerue 
 
Cinematography by
Néstor Almendros  (as Nestor Almendros)
 
Film Editing by
Martine Barraqué 
 
Production Design by
Jean-Pierre Kohut-Svelko 
 
Costume Design by
Lisele Roos 
 
Makeup Department
Jean-Pierre Berroyer .... key hair stylist
Didier Lavergne .... key makeup artist
Nadine Leroy .... hair stylist
Thi-Loan Nguyen .... makeup artist (as Thi Loan N'Guyen)
Françoise Ben Soussan .... makeup artist (as Françoise Ben Soussan)
 
Production Management
Jean-Louis Godfroy .... unit manager
Jean-José Richer .... production manager
Roland Thénot .... assistant production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Suzanne Schiffman .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Pierre Gompertz .... assistant production designer
Roland Jacob .... assistant production designer
Jacques Leguillon .... assistant production designer
René Ferracci .... poster designer (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Daniel Couteau .... sound effects
Michel Laurent .... sound
Jacques Maumont .... sound mixer
Michel Mellier .... sound
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Florent Bazin .... assistant camera
Gérard Bougeant .... grip
Jean-Pierre Fizet .... photographer
Charlie Freess .... key grip
Jacques Frejabue .... grip (as Jacques Fréjabue)
Jean-Claude Gasché .... chief electrician
Emilio Pacull .... assistant camera (as Emilio Pacull-Latorre)
Tessa Racine .... assistant camera
André Seybald .... electrician
Serge Valézy .... electrician
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Edwige Cherel .... assistant wardrobe designer
Christiane Fageol .... assistant wardrobe designer (as Christiane Aumand-Fageol)
Françoise Poillot .... assistant wardrobe designer
 
Editorial Department
Marie-Aimée Debril .... assistant editor
Jean-François Giré .... assistant editor
 
Other crew
Henry Dutrannoy .... production administrator
Christine Pellé .... script supervisor
Brigitte Faure .... production assistant (uncredited)
Gilles Loutfi .... trainee (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Le dernier métro" - France (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
131 min | France:133 min (director's cut)
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Fujicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
When Lucas talks to Marion about a play he saw in London, he is alluding to Patrick Hamilton's "Gaslight", which was twice made into a movie, by Thorold Dickinson in 1940, and by George Cukor in 1944.See more »
Goofs:
Crew or equipment visible: In one scene in the cellar, during a conversation between Marion and Lucas, we can see the sound recordist hiding himself in a corner of the cellar.See more »
Quotes:
Marion Steiner:It takes two to love, as it takes two to hate. And I will keep loving you, in spite of yourself. My heart beats faster when I think of you. Nothing else matters.See more »
Movie Connections:
References Bel Ami (1939)See more »
Soundtrack:
Sombreros et MantillesSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
26 out of 35 people found the following review useful.
One from Les Films du Carrosse, 9 February 2006
Author: jdcopp

One often sees the criticism of Francois Truffaut"s "Le Dernier Metro" ( "The Last Metro") that he had turned to making films in the tradition of the films that he had scorned as a young critic in the 1950s. Of course, most of these writers are not familiar with the films that he had scorned. I would say "yes" he was working in a tradition. He could almosthave titles the film "Si Paris occupeé nous était conté". Sacha Guitrywas one of his heroes. But he did call the film "Le Dernier Metro" and that title points to the tradition of the film and explains its style.It is true that the early scene where Bernard tries to pick up Arlette bears some resemblance to the scene at the beginning of "Les Enfants des Paradis" in which Frederick attempts to pick up Garance. It must be remembered though that the young critics of the 50s had no ax to grind with the Prevert-Carne films of the late 30s and the first half of the 40s. Anyone who watches the clip of Godard from 1963 on the "Bande a Part" will hear him praise the Carne of "Quai des Brumes" before deprecating the Carne of "Les Tricheurs". Even their criticism of Carne that merely photograph his screenwriters scenario, that he was more a "metteur en image" than a "metteur en scene", had started in the mid-40s by Henri Jeanson, Carne's one-time collaborator. But getting back to my point that scene occurring in the midst of the crowd on the Boulevard des Crime in the Carne film explains its title and theme.Carne's film is about theater-goers, even his four theatricalprotagonists all attend plays. Truffaut's film though is not so muchabout the audience as it is about the theater world and hence its title" Le Dernier Metro". Before I get back to my point I believe I should note here that "Le Dernier Metro" was meant to be one panel in a trilogy on the entertainment world. "La Nuit Americaine" ("Day for Night") was of course the film panel. And "L'Agence Magique" a film about Music Hall was never made. In the late 70s Truffaut had a screenplay for this film ready to shoot and had begun pre-production but the failure of "The Green Room" caused him to alter his plans and to film "L'Amour en Fuite".

The voice-over prologue describes an occupied Paris where night workers have to scurry to make the last metro in order to beat the curfew. What is left to our imaginations is to realize that many of these workers are theater people. Jean Marais whose real-life thrashing of the Je Suis Partout drama critic Alain Laubreaux provided the inspiration for one of the key scenes in the film described the last metro thusly in his autobiography "Histoires de ma Vie" (page 159)

"The last metro was marvelous. As packed as the others. It carried all of the theater world of Paris. Everyone knew everyone else. We spoke of the latest concert, of the ballet, of the theater. Outside, it was the blackout, the militias, German patrols, hostages if one was out past curfew." NOTE: "Tout-Paris" usually means " Paris high society" but Marais in the book frequently uses in a narrower sense of "the theater world".

In other words "Les Films de Carosse" had produced a film that represented "the last metro" as the golden coach of occupied Paris. Some quarter of a century earlier before Truffaut made "Le Dernier Metro" he with Jacques Rivette had interviewed Jean Renoir and Renoir told them that in order to do his film on the world of theater "The Golden Coach" he had found it necessary to subordinate his style to a theatrical style. Could it be that there is one explanation of the style of the film? So now Truffaut was returning to the style of "The Golden Coach".

Some other ideas gleaned from Nestor Almendros' "A Man With A Camera". Remember the scene from the beginning of the film that I spoke about earlier, the one were Bernard accosts Arlette. I can still remember the feeling of claustrophobia that I felt the first time I saw "Le Dernier Metro". And of course I was going to soon discover that one of the main characters in the film was hiding in a small room in the basement of his theater. Almendros speaks of using the camera to create a feeling of claustrophobia in this film. He also reveals that it was normal for Truffaut to keep his windows open. But in this film because of its theme and its time period, windows remained shut. Also, he and Truffaut wanted the look of early Agfacolor of films like "Munchhaussen" and "Die Goldene Stadt". A look that was gentler and softer than the vivid Technicolor films of the same period. Thus the set designer were asked for ocher-colored sets and the props and costumes were chosen in subdued colors. Also they changed their film stock to Fuji because it was closer to this look they were cultivating. As long as we are discussing Almendros I think it might be appropriate to end with a quote from his chapter on the film "The Green Room".

"As expected, "The Green Room" was not very well received. The theme of death rarely attracts crowds. This is almost an axiom in the cinema, and by producing so difficult and personal a work, risking almost certain economic failure, Truffaut showed once again that after sixteen films he was still the uncompromising artist he was as a young man." Nestor Almendros, "A Man With A Camera" page 220.

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