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Caboblanco (1980) Poster

(1980)

Trivia

This movie represented the third of nine teamings of director 'J Lee Thompson' with star actor Charles Bronson. Prior to this movie they had made together St. Ives (1976) and The White Buffalo (1977). After this picture, they made 10 to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), Murphy's Law (1986), Death Wish 4: The Crackdown (1987), Messenger of Death (1988) and Kinjite: Forbidden Subjects (1989).
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This was not the only movie made around the time of the early 1980s that purported to be a modern reworking of the Hollywood classic, Casablanca (1942). Both Cuba (1979) and Far East (1982) also re-tread the Casablanca storyline.
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The phrase "Cabo Blanco" comes from the Spanish language and translates into English as "White Cape".
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Though touted as a remake of Casablanca (1942), this movie actually has a completely different storyline regardless of some common story elements.
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Reportedly, when this movie was being cast, producers Paul Joseph and Lance Hool sought a leading man that women could respond well to and that ordinary men could identify with. Joseph said: "You have to look for a character who will fit hat mould. That's what Bogart was. I have to think back to my father, whose favorite actor was Humphrey Bogart mainly because he could relate to him as a man. And that is the truth of Bronson, too. Bronson is not as pretty as say Paul Newman. More men can relate to Bronson's looks."
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Leading actress Dominique Sanda once said of her co-star on this picture, Charles Bronson: "I think people are very scared of him."
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There is a noticeable comparison between Humphrey Bogart and Charles Bronson's acting careers, the two actors who starred in Casablanca (1942) and Caboblanco (1980) respectively. Both worked regularly with their respective spouses Lauren Bacall and Jill Ireland. Bogart worked with Bacall four times and Bronson worked with Ireland sixteen times. However, for Casablanca (1942) and Caboblanco (1980), neither Bronson nor Bogart worked with their wife.
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Once asked about comparisons to his character in this movie with Humphrey Bogart's in Casablanca (1942), Charles Bronson replied: "I play Charles Bronson".
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During production of this movie, Charles Bronson said: "It's not the role I accept, it's the possibility of the picture being entertaining. I work for the whole, not for myself. I work for the audience. I've always felt that people deserve that much when they pay to see your picture. This is why, when I choose a role, I believe in giving what I feel is worth the price of a ticket. I believe in giving service."
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Veteran Actor Gilbert Roland appears in this movie which has been likened to Casablanca (1942). In the year that Casablanca (1942) was theatrically released, Roland was appearing in Isle of Missing Men (1942) and Enemy Agents Meet Ellery Queen (1942). Caboblanco (1980) was Gilbert Roland's penultimate film. Barbarosa (1982) was his last.
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Although prominently billed on the opening and closing credits, Clifton James does not appear in the finished film.
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Originally this film first edit was 2 hours long. The production cut it down to 90 mins.
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While filming, Fernando Rey was much more of an a celebrity for the locals than Charles Bronson. This was due to the fact that he had appeared in so many Spanish language movies over the years.
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Paul Newman and Steve McQueen were both initially considered to play Gifford Hoyt.
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Promotional poster art was drawn prior to the script being written in order to get potential investors to put money into the movie.
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The original shooting script had a subplot about a giant squid that was ultimately dropped from the film.
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John Huston was considered to direct this film.
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Orson Welles was initially considered to play Captain Terredo.
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The producers originally wanted Michael York to portray Lewis Clarkson.
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George Kennedy was approached to play Gunther Beckdorff, but turned said offer down because he didn't want to go on location in Mexico for the shooting of this film.
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The destroyer seen in this film at the beginning was built for use in World War II. It was repainted and renamed for this movie.
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Curd Jürgens was also considered to play Gunther Beckdorff.
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The character of Marie Claire Allesandri was specifically written for Dominique Sanda to play.
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All the Mexican actors in minor roles had their voices looped by American actors in post-production.
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Dominique Sanda dubbed her own voice for the French version of this film.
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Over a hundred American crew members were flown in from California to work on this film.
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Jill Ireland was briefly considered to play Hera.
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Charles Bronson had it stipulated in his contract that he would only spend eight hours a day working throughout the shooting of this picture. This included time spent having his makeup done at the start of the day.
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Charles Bronson was paid one million dollars to play the lead role in this film.
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Since Dominique Sanda was about the same height as Charles Bronson, Sanda was often barefoot in many of her scenes with Bronson so she wouldn't look taller than him.
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This picture was made and released about thirty-eight years after Casablanca (1942), a movie that it said to be a remake of.
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This movie has been described as a remake of Casablanca (1942). It has also been described as a rip-off, homage, copy, reworking and tribute to that picture.
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In this movie, Dominique Sanda bears a startling resemblance to Ingrid Bergman, who starred in Casablanca (1942).
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The meaning and relevance of this movie's title is that Cabo Blanco is the name of a bayside fishing village in Peru, South America. Cabo Blanco is actually a real place there.
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Charles Bronson was about fifty-eight years of age when he appeared in this movie.
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In this movie, the equivalent characterizations of the lead roles played by Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains and Conrad Veidt in Casablanca (1942) were played by Charles Bronson, Dominique Sanda, Fernando Rey and Jason Robards respectively.
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Humphrey Bogart was the star of Casablanca (1942), the classic film that this movie is considered to be a modern version of. Lauren Bacall was first married to Bogart and was later married to Jason Robards who stars in this picture. As such, both of Bacall's two husbands have starred in both these movies, Casablanca (1942) and its (arguably) remake.
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Though set in Cabo Blanco, Peru, South America, this movie was actually filmed in Barra de Navidad, Jalisco, Mexico.
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This movie's title's spelling is often confusing as to whether it is one or two words. Pre-release publicity for this film spelled the title with two words, Cabo Blanco. This is also how the real place in Peru and the setting in the film is spelled. The movie's title is usually seen as a one word title as with Casablanca (1942) (and probably was spelled with just one word because of it). The one word version is how the title is spelled during the opening credits title cards. The film also has a subtitle that says 'Where legends are born'.
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'Halliwells' called this movie a "spoof of Casablanca (1942)".
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Though the Cabo Blanco in this movie is a fishing port in Peru, South America, there are at least four distinctive places around the world named Cabo Blanco. The three others are Cabo Blanco, a village in Arona, Spain; the Cabo Blanco Absolute Natural Reserve in Costa Rica, Central America and the Cabo Blanco Peninsula in the Western Sahara of Africa, also known as Cap Blanc or Ras Nouadhibou.
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When someone was caught sitting in Charles Bronson's movie star chair on the set of this movie, Bronson apparently warned him: "I only tell someone to get out of my chair once!"
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Phonetically, there are four major similarities between the words of the titles of Casablanca (1942) and Caboblanco (1980). First, both words have four syllables: "Cas-a-blanc-a" and "Cab-o-blanc-o". Second, the third syllable is the same in both words: "blanc". Third, both words have the same first two letters: "C" and "a" which form most of the first syllable in each word. Fourth, the second and fourth syllable in both words is a vowel, the same in each word, an "a" in Casablanca and an "o" in Caboblanco.
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Filming for this movie started as early as 1978, in November to be exact.
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This picture was not given a wide release in the USA until February 1981.
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Star Tony Curtis presents and introduction and afterword for Charles Bronson's movie Caboblanco (1980) on a 1998 DVD release for Caboblanco (1980). Caboblanco (1980) debuted about exactly a decade or ten years after You Can't Win 'Em All (1970) in which Curtis and Bronson co-starred.
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One of at least two theatrical feature films starring actor Jason Robards which feature "talking birds". The movies are Caboblanco (1980) and The Real Macaw (1998).
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