4.8/10
1,596
38 user 26 critic

The Awakening (1980)

R | | Horror | 31 October 1980 (USA)
An archeologist discovers his daughter is possessed by the spirit of an Egyptian queen. To save mankind he must destroy her.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
Reviews

Watch Now

From $2.00 (SD) on Amazon Video

1 nomination. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
Anne Corbeck
...
Margaret Corbeck
Patrick Drury ...
Paul Whittier
Bruce Myers ...
Dr. Khalid
...
Dr. El Sadek
...
Dr. Richter
Ahmed Osman ...
Yussef
...
Dr. Kadira
...
Hamid
Leonard Maguire ...
John Matthews
Ishia Bennison ...
Nurse
Madhav Sharma ...
Doctor
Michael Halphie ...
Doctor
Edit

Storyline

An American archaeologist is in Egypt with his pregnant wife, searching for the tomb of a long-lost Egyptian queen. At the same moment he discovers the tomb and opens it's accursed seal, his wife gives birth to his daughter. Years later it transpires that the malevolent spirit of the Egyptian queen left the tomb just as he was entering, and possessed his baby girl. As the truth becomes clear, the archaeologist realizes that he must destroy his daughter in a ceremonial ritual, before she uses her awesome powers to threaten the safety of mankind. Written by Jonathon Dabell <J.D.@pixie.ntu.ac.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

They thought they had buried her forever!

Genres:

Horror

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

31 October 1980 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Maldição do Vale dos Faraós  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$2,728,520 (USA) (31 October 1980)

Gross:

$8,415,112 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

,  »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Many critics and readers of The Awakening (1980)'s source Bram Stoker novel "The Jewel of Seven Stars" commented on the book's gruesome finale. According to Wikipedia, "When republished in 1904...the original ending was retained, but when Stoker attempted to republish it once more, shortly before his death in 1912, he was told that he would have to change the ending. As a result, Stoker removed Chapter XVI "Powers - Old and New" and gave the book a new, happier ending. For many years the original ending was unavailable to most readers. The 2008 Penguin Classics edition of 'The Jewel of Seven Stars'...restored the original text, including the original ending and Chapter XVI, and included the second, happier ending as an appendix". See more »

Goofs

When Jane and Matt discover the tomb entrance, Jane reads the hieroglyphic inscription from left to right, but the direction in which the inscription is written is right to left, as shown by the birds in it which face the start of the line by convention. See more »

Connections

Featured in Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Ankara Streets
(uncredited)
Music by Ali Isfahan (i.e. John Leach
KPM Music
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
The Sleepening.
10 October 2013 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

The Awakening is directed by Mike Newell and collectively adapted to screenplay by Clive Exton, Chris Bryant and Allan Scott from the Bram Stoker novel The Jewel of Seven Stars. It stars Charlton Heston, Susannah York, Jill Townsend and Stephanie Zimbalist. Music is by Claude Bolling and cinematography by Jack Cardiff.

Heston plays archaeologist Matthew Corbeck, who after discovering the tomb of disgraced Egyptian Queen Kara discovers his daughter is possessed by Kara's spirit and to save mankind he may have to destroy her.

It's honourably serious, a willing attempt to make an intelligent end of the world type picture with flecks of troubling family dynamics. The production value is top draw, every effort has been made to make it look great, with lavish photography (nice to see a film of this type actually be filmed in Egypt), skillfully crafted set designs and an evocative score that drifts across the sands with distinction. Hell, even the casting of Heston at a time when his star had considerably faded, still gave the production some weight. If only it wasn't so immeasurably dull and distant!

The makers, obviously tugging on the coat tails of The Omen and Mummy movies previously, never develop the edgy themes bubbling away just below the narrative's surface. It's often feels like a big compromise was put forward by an executive, a request that they must ensure deaths are the draw card and to hell with the possibility of making a substantial brain tickler. Or it could just be that there were too many writers in the mix?! So what we essentially get is a laboriously paced movie going through the motions until the next death scene arrives, and then it's back to some slow brooding again.

The cast are solid, the ending suitably downbeat, and if you like Omen type deaths then there are a couple here worth your time, but you may need plenty of energizer drinks to keep you awake first. 4/10


8 of 10 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?