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1980 and the Death of the Disco Musical

The AppleThe musical possesses a unique form of power rarely afforded to other Hollywood genres. In the words of film scholar Rick Altman, “The musical invites us to forget familiar notions of plot, psychological motivation, and causal relationships.” In contrast to other commercial genres, the musical is almost one-of-a-kind in its ability to arrest time and space, to suspend disbelief, to defy our lived understanding of human relationships and even the very conventions of filmgoing. In what other mainstream genre can fictional characters get away with looking into the camera lens so often? Dramatic logic is replaced in the Hollywood musical by spectacle and raw emotional appeal, with singing as the defining device for such purely cinematic priorities.But what happens to the musical when singing is taken out of it? This was the conundrum of the short-lived disco musical, a sub-genre that ended as soon as it began.Popular
See full article at MUBI »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Night Of The Comet (1984)

Post-apocalyptic films were a dime a dozen in the early ‘80s. They were almost always done on the cheap – a small cast of a few survivors, a barren desert and some rags for wardrobe, and voila! Throw it on HBO for a few years and call it a day. But sometimes ambition seeps in, and Night of the Comet (1984) is one of the best examples of low budget ingenuity, smart, sharply drawn characters, and a whole lot of heart. When the aliens return to take back the earth (do you want to claim responsibility for this freak show?) and wish to be shown a film indicative of the ‘80s, show them this – it represents all the best qualities of the decade’s filmmaking.

Distributed by Atlantic Releasing Corporation in mid-November, Night of the Comet brought in over $14 million against a $700,000 budget, making it an indie success with audiences and critics alike.
See full article at DailyDead »

Electric Boogaloo, the wild untold story of Cannon Films

Director and documentarian Mark Hartley scores both a film history and comedy success with this ‘wild, untold’ account of the 1980s film studio that was both revered and despised by everyone who had contact with it. The ‘cast list’ of interviewees is encyclopedic, everybody has a strong opinion, and some of them don’t need four-letter words to describe their experience!

Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films

On a double bill with

Machete Maidens Unleashed!

Blu-ray

Umbrella Entertainment (Au, all-region

2014 / Color / 1:77 widescreen / 106 min. / Street Date April 4, 2017 / Available from Umbrella Entertainment / 34.99

Starring: Menahem Golan, Yoram Globus, Al Ruban, Alain Jakubowicz, Albert Pyun, Alex Winter, Allen DeBevoise, Avi Lerner, Barbet Schroeder, Bo Derek, Boaz Davidson, Cassandra Peterson, Catherine Mary Stewart, Charles Matthau, Christopher C. Dewey, Christopher Pearce, Cynthia Hargrave, Dan Wolman, Daniel Loewenthal, David Del Valle, David Paulsen, David Sheehan, David Womark, Diane Franklin, Dolph Lundgren, Edward R. Pressman,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

19 Things You Never Knew About Star Trek: The Original Series

19 Things You Never Knew About Star Trek: The Original Series
Star Trek: The Original Series aired 50 years ago, Thursday. (Actually, that's a bit of a cheat: The series originally aired Sept. 6, 1966 … in Canada, so you know, it doesn't count.)

The show never achieved high ratings during its original run of three seasons, but as it went into syndication throughout the 1970s, it became the cult classic it is today, with 13 feature films and five additional television series following. In honor of its 50th anniversary, we're rounding up some facts you might not have known about the series that boldly went where no other show had gone before.

1. Some of the
See full article at People.com - TV Watch »

19 Things You Never Knew About Star Trek: The Original Series

  • PEOPLE.com
19 Things You Never Knew About Star Trek: The Original Series
Star Trek: The Original Series aired 50 years ago, Thursday. (Actually, that's a bit of a cheat: The series originally aired Sept. 6, 1966 … in Canada, so you know, it doesn't count.) The show never achieved high ratings during its original run of three seasons, but as it went into syndication throughout the 1970s, it became the cult classic it is today, with 13 feature films and five additional television series following. In honor of its 50th anniversary, we're rounding up some facts you might not have known about the series that boldly went where no other show had gone before. 1. Some of the
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

19 Things You Never Knew About Star Trek: The Original Series

  • PEOPLE.com
19 Things You Never Knew About Star Trek: The Original Series
Star Trek: The Original Series aired 50 years ago, Thursday. (Actually, that's a bit of a cheat: The series originally aired Sept. 6, 1966 … in Canada, so you know, it doesn't count.) The show never achieved high ratings during its original run of three seasons, but as it went into syndication throughout the 1970s, it became the cult classic it is today, with 13 feature films and five additional television series following. In honor of its 50th anniversary, we're rounding up some facts you might not have known about the series that boldly went where no other show had gone before. 1. Some of the
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Cannon Films are coming back and producing American Ninja Apprentice and Return of The Delta Force

If you’re a fan of bad movies, then you’ll probably know The Cannon Group. Throughout the 1980s, they brought us cinema classics like Death Wish 3, Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo, The Apple, Masters of the Universe, Superman IV: The Quest for Peace, American Ninja, Missing in Action, Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 and Delta Force. They also once bought the rights to Spider-Man thinking he was a human spider before realising he was a comic book character and promptly sold the rights back.

The Israeli cousins Yoram Globus and Menahem Golan joined Cannon Films in 1979 and brought their business culture to Hollywood. Whereas most studios would release 8 movies in one year, Cannon would release 40 and used names like Charles Bronson, Chuck Norris, Sylvester Stallone and Jean-Claude Van Damme to sell their movies.

They went out of business in 1994 after a string of unsuccessful movies left them bankrupt, but now they
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

9 important lessons from Cannon Films documentary Electric Boogaloo

9 important lessons from Cannon Films documentary Electric Boogaloo
Who needs good taste when you have plenty of enthusiasm? Fantastic new documentary Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films charts the rise and fall of two movie-obsessed Israeli cousins - Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus - after buying a financially troubled American film studio in 1979.

The duo subsequently churned out some of the most iconic movies of the 1980s... but not necessarily on the strength of their artistic merit. Buy 'em cheap and pile them high was the initial ethos that led to titles like Hospital Massacre, Enter the Ninja and a plethora of increasingly exploitational Death Wish films. Yet occasional gems and cult classics like Runaway Train and Lifeforce emerged too, plus there's the title of a breakdancing movie sequel that entered popular culture - Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo.

So many fascinating revelations emerge in the documentary surrounding the genesis, production and release of the films
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

9 important lessons from Cannon documentary Electric Boogaloo

9 important lessons from Cannon documentary Electric Boogaloo
Who needs good taste when you have plenty of enthusiasm? Fantastic new documentary Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films charts the rise and fall of two movie-obsessed Israeli cousins - Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus - after buying a financially troubled American film studio in 1979.

The duo subsequently churned out some of the most iconic movies of the 1980s... but not necessarily on the strength of their artistic merit. Buy 'em cheap and pile them high was the initial ethos that led to titles like Hospital Massacre, Enter the Ninja and a plethora of increasingly exploitational Death Wish films. Yet occasional gems and cult classics like Runaway Train and Lifeforce emerged too, plus there's the title of a breakdancing movie sequel that entered popular culture - Breakin' 2: Electric Boogaloo.

So many fascinating revelations emerge in the documentary surrounding the genesis, production and release of the films
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Electric Boogaloo review

The rise and fall of Cannon Films is told in Mark Hartley's wildly entertaining documentary, Electric Boogaloo. Here's Ryan's review...

Producers Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus were famous (or infamous) for many things, but a stringent approach to quality filmmaking was hardly one of them. At the height of their success in the 1980s, the Israeli cousins, and their company Cannon Films, were synonymous with cheap B-movies of just about every kind: Chuck Norris action flicks, sex comedies, ninja martial arts epics, dance movies and tawdry slasher horrors.

Their films frequently horrified critics, but became a staple of video rental stores: with Cannon Films cranking out as many as 50 or so pictures a year at its peak, the company's distinctive logo and self-explanatory film titles (New Year's Evil, Avenging Force, Enter The Ninja) were ubiquitous throughout the 80s and early 90s. The company was eventually brought down by its fast-and-loose approach to film production,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Menahem Golan Remembered: Cannon Films Mixed Awards Bait with Schlock

Menahem Golan Remembered: Cannon Films Mixed Awards Bait with Schlock
Menahem Golan, who died Aug. 8 at age 85, loved movies, perhaps too much. At its height, Cannon Films — the Hollywood studio Golan ran with his cousin, Yoram Globus — was releasing nearly one film per week: an eclectic bounty of awards bait and bottom-drawer schlock, all foisted on the public with a mix of carnival-barker rhetoric and vaudevillian flair. In the 1980s, the Cannon logo was unmistakable, along with its promise of cut-rate adventure starring Chuck Norris, Charles Bronson, Lou Ferrigno or an up-and-coming Jean-Claude Van Damme. (That Golan never managed to team these signature Cannon brands in a single movie — an “Expendables” — boggles the mind.)

“It was an extraordinary experience to have a man who made decisions without thinking for three minutes,” recalls Andrei Konchalovsky, the Soviet emigre director who made four films for Cannon, including “Runaway Train” (1985). “That was the quality that also ruined the company, but it left me with carte blanche doing films.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Menahem Golan, prolific producer of '80s action pics, dies at 85

Menahem Golan, prolific producer of '80s action pics, dies at 85
Menahem Golan, best known for producing and directing scores of schlocky ’80s action pics under the Cannon Films banner—including the likes of Bloodsport and some of the Death Wish sequels—died Friday, Haaretz reports. He was 85.

Obsessed with movies from a young age, the Israeli-born Golan got his start working with B-movie master Roger Corman on 1963’s The Young Racers. He eventually teamed up with his cousin Yoram Globus to head up The Cannon Group, a fledgling production company that they bought in 1979. They transformed Cannon into a veritable force in the industry by the mid-’80s, producing testosterone-driven
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Legendary Producer Menahem Golan Has Died

Menaham Golan, a legendary filmmaker, has died at the age of 85, according to Haaretz. Golan began his career as a writer, producer, and director in the early 1960s, in partnership with his cousin Yoram Globus, but despite an Academy Award nomination for Sallah in 1964, it wasn't until his cult hit The Apple in 1980 that he gained international recognition. Shortly before that, Golan and Globus took control of The Cannon Group, and from there things took off, as the pair focused on action films that translated well both in the U.S. and the worldwide market. Cannon dominated that sector of the market throughout the 1980s The company was bought up in 1989 after a series of financial disappointments, though Golan continued making movies for another 25...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The 10 Hottest Pics Of Birthday Boy Joe Zaso

Is it those piercing eyes with the glint of mischief? The impossible body? The sexiest bald head since Captain Picard? The manscaping as performance art?

It’s all of those things, and much more, that make director/writer/actor/producer/Ultimate Horror Himbo Joe Zaso such an imposing and endearing presence.

Today is his birthday, so let’s pay tribute with a look at some choice moments from his career.

Joe has appeared in over 20 mostly low budget, mostly horror films over the last 15 years, frequently as the villain. Here he is as the evil doctor in 2010′s Virus X.

He’s the actual New Jersey Devil!

My personal favorite – Joe’s “Cafe Himbo,” in which he cooks with faboo figures from cult films of the past. Here he is with Catherine Mary Stewart from Night Of The Comet and The Apple.

Oh, and he appeared with a couple of
See full article at The Backlot »

A “Hierarchy” of gore and horror heroines; exclusive pics

  • Fangoria
A “Hierarchy” of gore and horror heroines; exclusive pics
“I wanted to make The Hierarchy like a feature film with all the boring parts cut out!” writer/director Jorge Godinez tells Fango. “I’m from Mexico, but really love American teen movies and pop culture, and I wanted to combine those elements and make something hip, funny and bloody. If I had to describe what I was going for, I would say The Hierarchy is like Carrie meets Heathers.”

The Hierarchy, produced by Julia Hebner, is set at Crawford Academy, where shy student Marti (Megan Hartig, pictured right with Godinez) is routinely tormented by the school’s top trio of mean girls (Michelle Cutolo, Elizabeth Venezia and Avery Dresel-Kurtz, 1st photo below left-right), with the complicity of guidance counselor Regina Fletcher (Catherine Mary Stewart of Night Of The Comet, The Last Starfighter and The Apple, 2nd photo below). What they don’t know is that Marti, who works in
See full article at Fangoria »

A “Hierarchy” of gore and horror heroines; exclusive pics

  • Fangoria
A “Hierarchy” of gore and horror heroines; exclusive pics
“I wanted to make The Hierarchy like a feature film with all the boring parts cut out!” writer/director Jorge Godinez tells Fango. “I’m from Mexico, but really love American teen movies and pop culture, and I wanted to combine those elements and make something hip, funny and bloody. If I had to describe what I was going for, I would say The Hierarchy is like Carrie meets Heathers.”

The Hierarchy, produced by Julia Hebner, is set at Crawford Academy, where shy student Marti (Megan Hartig, pictured right with Godinez) is routinely tormented by the school’s top trio of mean girls (Michelle Cutolo, Elizabeth Venezia and Avery Dresel-Kurtz, 1st photo below left-right), with the complicity of guidance counselor Regina Fletcher (Catherine Mary Stewart of Night Of The Comet, The Last Starfighter and The Apple, 2nd photo below). What they don’t know is that Marti, who works in
See full article at Fangoria »

John Moffatt obituary

Classical actor who graced the stage with decorum and stillness

Although perhaps best known as Hercule Poirot, Agatha Christie's moustache-twirling detective, on BBC radio, John Moffatt, who has died aged 89, was a devastatingly clinical and classical stage actor of irreproachable taste and valour. He seemed something of a throwback, but there are very few today who could rival his armour-plated technique, his almost uncanny empathy with comic style ranging from the Restoration to Rattigan – his trademark stillness and decorum on stage was at odds with false notions of flounce and frilliness – or his incisive articulation.

He was a beacon in his profession, greatly admired and loved, not least because he had worked with almost everyone of note in the business, from his idols Noël Coward and John Gielgud, to his best friends Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Alec McCowen and Joan Plowright, but chiefly because he was so funny and modest about his own contribution.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Stay Up Late with the Film Society of Lincoln Center's Summer Midnight Movies Series

If you're a New Yorker who stays up late, this news is for you. The Film Society of Lincoln Center has announced the lineup of its new Midnight Movies series running every Friday night in June, July, and August. Most are horror films, but even those that aren't deserve attention.

The voracious maw and mysterious subversives of horror and sci-fi are let out after dark in what's sure to be the most terrifying program of the summer. Here's the full schedule; for more info visit the official Film Society of Lincoln Center website.

Star Wars Uncut

Casey Pugh, 2012

Fri Jun 1: 11:59 pm

Galactic Premiere!

For this crowdsourced, shot-by-shot fan-film remake of George Lucas’ Episode IV – A New Hope, 473 volunteers reshot or animated their assigned 15-second sections as they saw fit. The result is one of the Internet’s true cinematic wonders.

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre

Tobe Hooper, 1974

Fri
See full article at Dread Central »

Drafthouse Films Acquires Us Rights to “Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story Of Cannon Films”

New Doc Will Chronicle Infamous ’80s Exploitation

Production Outfit From Acclaimed Director Mark Hartley

Drafthouse Films, the distribution arm of the world-famous Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, announced today the acquisition of all Us rights to Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story Of Cannon Films from world-wide sales agent Celluloid Nightmares. From acclaimed cult film documentarian Mark Hartley (Not Quite Hollywood, Machete Maidens Unleashed), the film centers on the story of two Israeli-born, movie-obsessed cousins, Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus, who in pursuit of the “American dream” launched an indie studio that would produce over 120 exploitation films from 1979-1989 turning a renegade outfit into the proclaimed “seventh Hollywood major.” The film is currently in pre-production in Australia with Producer Veronica Fury and Executive Producers Xyz Films (upcoming Sony Pictures release The Raid). A theatrical release is being planned for late 2012 to coincide with a traveling roadshow retrospective of Cannon’s seminal films.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Drafthouse Films Firing Up Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films

For those of us who grew up during the decade of big hair and excess, just the mere sight of the Cannon Films logo is enough to conjure more than a boatload of nostalgia. Thanks to Drafthouse Films said boat is soon to be sailing our way!

From the Press Release

Drafthouse Films, the distribution arm of the world-famous Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, announced today the acquisition of all Us rights to Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films from world-wide sales agent Celluloid Nightmares.

From acclaimed cult film documentarian Mark Hartley (Not Quite Hollywood, Machete Maidens Unleashed), the film centers on the story of two Israeli-born, movie-obsessed cousins, Menahem Golan and Yoram Globus, who in pursuit of the "American dream" launched an indie studio that would produce over 120 exploitation films from 1979-1989, turning a renegade outfit into the proclaimed "seventh Hollywood major."

The film is currently in pre-production in Australia.
See full article at Dread Central »
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