Television show featuring dancing and popular music.
Reviews

Episodes

Seasons


Years



8   7   6   5   4   3   2   1  
1988   1987   1986   1985   1984   1983   … See all »
Won 3 Primetime Emmys. Another 11 nominations. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Series cast summary:
Robert W. Morgan ...
 Announcer / ... 82 episodes, 1980-1986
Pamela Rossi ...
 Herself (Solid Gold Dancer, 1980-1986) / ... 42 episodes, 1980-1986
Alex Cole ...
 Himself - Dancer / ... 42 episodes, 1980-1983
Darcel Wynne ...
 Herself (Solid Gold Dancer, 1980-1983, 1985-1986) / ... 40 episodes, 1980-1986
Paula Beyers ...
 Herself - Dancer / ... 39 episodes, 1980-1983
...
 Herself - Hostess / ... 37 episodes, 1981-1987
Deborah Jenssen ...
 Dancer / ... 37 episodes, 1980-1984
...
 Himself - Solid Gold Dancer / ... 35 episodes, 1980-1984
Lezlie Mogell ...
 Herself - Dancer / ... 33 episodes, 1983-1985
Edit

Storyline

First appearing before music videos had become commonplace, this show featured the week's top hits in pop music. Guest performers would occasionally appear on the show to play their songs. Typically, however, the only visual accompaniment to the music was the Solid Gold Dancers, a dozen or so dancers in skimpy costumes who would perform interpretive renditions of such hits as "Down Under" and "Maniac". Written by Jean-Marc Rocher <rocher@fiberbit.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

dance | non fiction | See All (2) »

Genres:

Music

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

January 1980 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Solid Gold in Concert  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Originally premiered as "Solid Gold '79", a 2-hour special in January 1980. Due to high ratings, it became a weekly series in September 1980. See more »

Connections

Featured in I Love the '80s Strikes Back: 1980 (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

Solid Gold Theme
Written by Michael K. Miller and Dean Pitchford
Performed by Dionne Warwick and Andy Gibb and Marilyn McCoo and Deborah Ludwig Davis
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A Good Piece of '80s Nostalgia
24 November 2013 | by See all my reviews

I remember watching this every Saturday afternoon at 5 when I was a teen and enjoyed the top ten countdown of songs as well as the dancing. I didn't care too much for the different hosts though that took turns holding the show's reigns during it's run.

Rick Dees was by far the worst host. I got tired of his comic jabs about being the singer of 'Disco Duck'. I didn't care much for Marilyn McCoo either though she could be pretty decent sometimes. I just didn't care for her singing. I remember when she sang Billy Ocean's 'Loverboy' and changed the lyrics from, "I want to be your lover boy" to "I want you to be my lover boy".

Dionne Warwick was alright as host for awhile, but she kind of made things mellow, especially when one episode was entirely dedicated to Frank Sinatra and his long list of songs. She even kissed up to Frank too during an interview with him. After he said there was something further he wanted to say, she said, "You can do anything you want."

The one co-host I enjoyed was Arsenio Hall and his comedy sketches and it's too bad he was never made the main host of the program. He carried the potential and it isn't surprising he got his own talk show later on.

The list of pop star guests were endless, but it was obvious to see they didn't really perform their songs. They lip-synced. I noticed when the Nu Shooz band performed their hit, "I Can't Wait" the musicians were clearly pretending to play their instruments.

There was also a noticeable degree of favoritism towards some singers, like in the Solid Gold special where they had a top 50 countdown of the best songs from movies. 'Flashdance - What A Feeling' was at #1, but the show didn't give the song a grand finale to the countdown. They merely showed the song playing to a video of World War I planes flying in the air. The grand finale had been reserved for the #2 song in the countdown: Stevie Wonder's 'I Just Called To Say I Love You' from The Woman In Red (1984). Easy to see that Solid Gold wasn't pleased with the song being at #2 and treated it like it was #1 instead.

Regardless of the highs and lows, this show was an iconic piece of the 80s era featuring the fashion styles and hit performers of the day. It truly is a deep rooted piece of nostalgia for that decade.


2 of 2 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 6 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

IMDb's Top 10 Stars of 2017

"The IMDb Show" connects the dots between IMDb's Top 10 Stars of 2017 and unwraps some of the most memorable and festive animated holiday specials.

Watch now