Track stars Phyllis(Phyl) and Mikhail(Mikhy)are on opposides sides of the Cold War but meet and marry. Mikhy defects and they move in with Phyl's father Max, where Mikhy must navigate the ... See full summary »
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1980  

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
Rick Lohman ...
 Mikhail 'Mikhy' Orlov 6 episodes, 1980
...
 Phyllis 'Phyl' Wilson 6 episodes, 1980
Larry Haines ...
 Max Wilson 6 episodes, 1980
...
 Vladimir Gimenko 6 episodes, 1980
...
 Edgar 'Truck' Morley 6 episodes, 1980
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Storyline

Track stars Phyllis(Phyl) and Mikhail(Mikhy)are on opposides sides of the Cold War but meet and marry. Mikhy defects and they move in with Phyl's father Max, where Mikhy must navigate the American cultural landscape. Russian agent Gimenko trails him, trying to convince him to return to the Mother Country.

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Comedy

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26 May 1980 (USA)  »

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Rick Lohman and Larry Haines played grandson and grandfather on the daytime drama Search For Tomorrow. See more »

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Cold War borscht, lukewarm at best
6 January 2013 | by (Minnesooooooooota) – See all my reviews

This was an attempt at a Cold War sitcom that fell flat. Phyl(lis) is a young American athlete who falls in love with Mikhy (Mikhail), an athlete from the then-Soviet Union, who defects in order to live with Phyl and her family. It's a set-up for lots of bad fish-out-of-water jokes, along with a cute-and-cuddly KGB agent (Michael Pataki) who follows Mikhy in hopes of getting him back to the Soviet Union.

The only reason why I recall this at all is because I attended one of the shows in 1979 when they were filmed. We laughed dutifully, but even as teenagers at the time, we easily predicted this would go nowhere. When it actually made it onto TV in 1980, it had to have been about the same time that Jimmy Carter had announced a boycott of the Moscow Olympics over the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. It made the already-ridiculous premise even more absurd.


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