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Frank Ocean Shares His Favorite Films, Including Tarkovsky, PTA, Kurosawa, Lynch, Kubrick & More

After a few delays, Frank Ocean‘s Channel Orange follow-up, Blond, has now arrived and, with it, not only an additional visual album, but Boys Don’t Cry, a magazine that only a select few were able to get their hands on. (Although, if you believe the artist’s mom, we can expect a wider release soon.) In between a personal statement about his new work and a Kanye West poem about McDonalds, Ocean also listed his favorite films of all-time and we have the full list today.

Clocking at 207.23 hours, as Ocean notes, his list includes classics from Andrei Tarkovsky, David Lynch, Ingmar Bergman, Stanley Kubrick, Martin Scorsese, Orson Welles, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Jean Cocteau, Alfred Hitchcock, Francis Ford Coppola, Fritz Lang, Werner Herzog, Akira Kurosawa, Ridley Scott, Bernardo Bertolucci, Sergei Eisenstein, F. W. Murnau, Luis Buñuel, and more.

As for some more recent titles, it looks like The Royal Tenenbaums
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Lo and Behold’ Exclusive Promo: Werner Herzog Dives Into The Heart of The Internet

‘Lo and Behold’ Exclusive Promo: Werner Herzog Dives Into The Heart of The Internet
The Internet is all around us, connecting humans with each other and providing the world with more information than ever before, but what is its existential impact? How has it changed our worldviews? Director Werner Herzog chronicles the virtual world from its origins to its outermost reaches in his new documentary “Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World.” Containing interviews with such luminaries as Bob Kahn, Elon Musk, and Sebastian Thrun, Herzog explores the digital landscape with his trademark curiosity and sparks a number of provocative conversations about how the online world has immeasurably transformed our real world, from business to education, space travel to healthcare, and even our personal relationships. Watch an exclusive promo for the film below.

Read More: Sundance Review: Werner Herzog’s ‘Lo and Behold’ Will Make You Experience the Internet in New Ways

Werner Herzog is one of the more acclaimed film directors of the 20th century.
See full article at Indiewire »

Coming Distractions: Mubi celebrates Werner Herzog’s “Ecstatic Fictions” in a month-long tribute

Werner Herzog gets a lot of accolades as a documentary filmmaker these days, but his fiction work is a pretty big deal, too—it’s just that once you make a movie about a real guy getting eaten by a bear, people tend to forget about the other stuff. Arthouse streaming service Mubi still cares about Herzog’s fiction films, though, so it’s holding a month-long tribute called “Werner Herzog: Ecstatic Fictions” that will temporarily add five classic Herzog films—several of which feature his best fiend, Klaus Kinski—to Mubi’s ever-changing collection. The five films are Nosferatu The Vampyre, Woyzeck, Stroszek, Heart Of Glass, and Fitzcarraldo, and you can see glimpses of each one in the trailer Mubi put together up above. To learn more about Mubi’s Herzog collection (or to learn more about Mubi’s curated approach to movie streaming), you can go to
See full article at The AV Club »

‘Lo and Behold’ Exclusive Posters: Werner Herzog Examines The Virtual World

‘Lo and Behold’ Exclusive Posters: Werner Herzog Examines The Virtual World
Werner Herzog’s latest documentary “Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World” chronicles the virtual world from its unlikely origins to its outermost reaches, examining the modern, malleable digital landscape with a curious, keen eye. Aided by his indelible voiceover, Herzog speaks with such tech visionaries as Bob Kahn, Elon Musk, and Sebastian Thrun to explore how the virtual has completely changed the physical, and the ways in which our lives are forever altered by our connection to the Internet. Herzog probes the philosophical questions that lie not so far beneath the surface and takes a harsh look at the benefits and pitfalls of our new world. See some exclusive posters from the film below.

Read More: Sundance Review: Werner Herzog’s ‘Lo and Behold’ Will Make You Experience the Internet in New Ways

Herzog has directed numerous acclaimed fiction and documentary films, some of which are considered the very best in cinematic history.
See full article at Indiewire »

Werner Herzog: Ecstatic Fictions - A Feature Film Retrospective

Werner Herzog: Ecstatic Fictions, a retrospective dedicated to Werner Herzog's fiction filmmaking, will be running on Mubi in the United States from May 28 - July 29, 2016.My Best Fiend: A metaphor for...something "It’s a great metaphor,” Werner Herzog declares proudly towards the end of My Best Fiend, his autobiographical reflection on fifteen years of cinematic collaboration with actor Klaus Kinski. The metaphor in question is visual. Herzog and film set photographer Beat Presser are looking at a black and white photo hanging in Presser’s apartment. It’s a striking tableau and gripping enough that it would become the poster image for Herzog's 1982 collaboration with Kinski, Fitzcarraldo. The titular character stands in the foreground, yet with his back to the camera. His emotions are unavailable, but he is undoubtedly preoccupied with the 300 ton steamboat high above him at an impossible 90 degree angle, as it disappears up
See full article at MUBI »

Daily | Eva Mattes @ 60

Eva Mattes, who turns 60 today, has been acting on stage and in front of the camera since she was twelve. Internationally, she'll probably always be associated with the New German Cinema. She was still a teenager when she appeared as a Vietnamese rape victim in Michael Verhoeven's o.k. (1970), which caused an uproar at the Berlinale. In 1979, Mattes won a Best Supporting Actress award in Cannes for her performance in Werner Herzog's Woyzeck. She'd previously worked with him on Stroszek (1977). She appeared in several films by Rainer Werner Fassbinder and played him two years after his death in Ein Mann wie Eva. More recently, Mattes has appeared in Frieder Schlaich's Otomo (1999), Jean-Jacques Annaud's Enemy at the Gates (2001) and Percy Adlon's Mahler on the Couch (2010). » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | Eva Mattes @ 60

Eva Mattes, who turns 60 today, has been acting on stage and in front of the camera since she was twelve. Internationally, she'll probably always be associated with the New German Cinema. She was still a teenager when she appeared as a Vietnamese rape victim in Michael Verhoeven's o.k. (1970), which caused an uproar at the Berlinale. In 1979, Mattes won a Best Supporting Actress award in Cannes for her performance in Werner Herzog's Woyzeck. She'd previously worked with him on Stroszek (1977). She appeared in several films by Rainer Werner Fassbinder and played him two years after his death in Ein Mann wie Eva. More recently, Mattes has appeared in Frieder Schlaich's Otomo (1999), Jean-Jacques Annaud's Enemy at the Gates (2001) and Percy Adlon's Mahler on the Couch (2010). » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

What to Watch This Week: 'Neighbors,' 'Gotham,' 'Scandal,' & More

  • Moviefone
At a loss for what to watch this week? From new DVDs and Blu-rays, to what's streaming on Netflix, we've got you covered.

New on DVD and Blu-ray

"Neighbors"

Rose Byrne and Seth Rogen star as a married couple living in a nice suburban neighborhood with their new baby. When a fraternity moves in next door, the Radners struggle with feeling terrible uncool and also having their lives wrecked by a bunch of hard-partying bros. Zac Efron co-stars as Teddy, the head of the frat, with Dave Franco as his right-hand man.

"Halloween: The Complete Collection"

Do you need this 15-disc Blu-ray box set comprised of all of the "Halloween" movies, including the producer's cut of "Halloween 6: The Curse of Michael Myers," Rob Zombie's 2007 and 2009 versions, audio commentary, and lots more? "Need" is such a childish word. You won't literally die if you didn't manage to order
See full article at Moviefone »

'Noah', Herzog Collection, 'Big Chill' and 'Twin Peaks' On DVD and Blu-ray This Week

Herzog: The Collection I've been reviewing Werner Herzog movies for the last 13 weeks or whatever it is and all in anticipation of this new 16-film collection from Shout Factory, which finally releases today and includes Even Dwarfs Started Small, Land of Silence and Darkness, Fata Morgana, Aguirre, the Wrath of God, The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, Heart of Glass, Stroszek, Woyzeck, Nosferatu the Vampyre, Fitzcarraldo, Ballad of the Little Soldier, Where the Green Ants Dream, Cobra Verde, Lessons of Darkness, Little Dieter Needs to Fly and My Best Fiend. Of the bunch I can tell you flat out Aguirre, the Wrath of God, The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, Stroszek, Nosferatu the Vampyre and Fitzcarraldo are great films and that's without the special features this set contains, which are: English Audio Commentaries: Even Dwarfs Started Small, Fata Morgana, Aguirre, the Wrath of God, The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, Heart of Glass,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

"Herzog: The Collection", Limited Edition Set To Be Released By Shout! Factory

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro has received the following press release from Shout! Factory:

A visionary creator unlike any other, with a passion for unveiling truths about nature and existence by blurring the line between reality and fiction, Werner Herzog is undoubtedly one of cinema’s most controversial and enigmatic figures. Audiences the world over have marveled at his uniquely moving, often disturbing, but always awe-inspiring stories, and his ever-growing body of work has inspired an untold number of filmmakers. He is, and continues to be, the most daring filmmaker of our time.

In celebration of this cinematic vanguard, Shout! Factory will release Herzog: The Collection on July 29th, 2014. Limited to 5,000 copies, the 13-disc box set features 16 acclaimed films and documentaries, 15 of which are making their Blu-ray debuts. Herzog: The Collection also features a 40 page booklet that includes photos, an essay by award-winning author Stephen J. Smith, and in-depth film synopses by Herzog
See full article at CinemaRetro »

'Stroszek' (1977) Movie Review

Werner Herzog's Stroszek is exactly what you'd expect from the eccentric filmmaker, which is to say it's somewhat inexplicable, entrancing, honest and leaves us scratching our heads for meaning as much as it all seems crystal clear. I've seen it referred to as a comedy and I guess if you consider the premise it does sound like one of those "a rabbi, a priest and a minister walk into a bar" jokes, but therein lies the mystery of Herzog, a man that will take a mildly retarded ex-con, a prostitute and an elderly German man and offer a scenario wherein the trio pack up, leave Germany and make a new home in Wisconsin. Makes perfect sense... rightc The film's origins are as wild, if not more so, than the premise. Herzog originally intended to cast his lead actor, Bruno S. (The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser), in Woyzeck only to
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

'Cobra Verde' (1987) Movie Review

I believe there's a hint as to what we're supposed to take out of Werner Herzog introduces Cobra Verde in the speed with which he introduces the film's central character, Francisco Manoel da Silva (Klaus Kinski), a ruined Brazilian rancher-turned-bandit who eventually finds himself at the center of the slave trade between Africa and South America. We never get to know Francisco the rancher, instead we first see him rumbling down a muddy hill, where he works for a gold mining company, and has just learned his wages have gone straight to the bank. That night he kills his boss, the scene cuts to black, next we meet the man Francisco has become, the feared bandit known as Cobra Verde (Green Snake). Cold, fearless and without sympathy, da Silva's travels eventually find him in the favor of Don Octavio Coutinho (Jose Lewgoy), who hires da Silva to oversea his sugar
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

'Woyzeck' (1979) Movie Review

Straining, sweating and struggling in the face of physical torment via his commanding officers, Werner Herzog's Woyzeck opens to the pained expression of Klaus Kinski as the film's title character, garrison soldier Franz Woyzeck. The scene plays after a melodic, harpsichord interlude introducing us to the small German town in which the film is set, transitioning to harsh strings as Herzog overcranks Woyzeck's introduction, bounding into view and rigidly going through his marching orders, pushed to his physical limit. Next we're witness to the psychological torment Woyzeck endures at the hands of his captain (Wolfgang Reichmann) and then again from a man we come to know only as Doctor (Willy Semmelrogge). A lowly private and strapped for cash with a child out of wedlock, Woyzeck submits to experiments at the hands of the doctor, including a diet in which he can only eat peas. His descent into madness
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

'My Best Fiend - Klaus Kinski' (1999) Movie Review

I absolutely need to watch more films starring German actor Klaus Kinski. Outside of his Werner Herzog appearances I've only seen him in Sergio Leone's For a Few Dollars More, David Lean's Doctor Zhivago and Sergio Corbucci's The Great Silence and with IMDb crediting him in over 130 films, I've clearly missed a few. Kinski had a raw intensity Herzog clearly knew how to exploit, most notably in Aguirre, The Wrath of God and Fitzcarraldo, films where the production was as harrowing if not more so than the stories they were telling making it hard to tell where Kinski the actor ends and his character begins. Within the confines of Herzog's 1999 documentary My Best Fiend - Klaus Kinski, we get a small glimpse of the man Herzog met when he was only a child as he returns to the now-renovated apartment where he first met Kinski. He takes us on a walking tour,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

What I Watched, What You Watched #244

Four movies for me this week, two in theaters -- Boyhood and Million Dollar Arm -- and a couple at home, one being Werner Herzog's Woyzeck and the other being Steven Spielberg's Duel. I will be reviewing Boyhood, Million Dollar Arm and Woyzeck in good time, but Duel was one I'd had on the DVR for a long time and finally got around to watching it, inspired by the Spielberg post I wrote on Friday. Based on the Richard Matheson story and with a screenplay by Matheson, Duel was Spielberg's first feature length movie, though it was made for television. A very simple story of a man driving a long distance, home to his wife when he passes an old truck on the highway only to find the driver of the truck decides to spend the rest of the drive tormenting the man, attempting to run him off the road,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

What I Watched, What You Watched #242

It was a very busy week for me as I saw three movies in theaters and watched another five at home. As for the theatrical trips, they included two I've already reviewed -- The Other Woman (read the review here) and Brick Mansions (read the review here) -- and Jon Favreau's Chef (5/9), which I already wrote a little about, but I'll say it again here, I enjoyed it... review coming in a couple weeks. At home I watched a screener for Last Passenger (review here) and I also watched Blue Ruin On Demand and I'll have a review of that this coming week, but I did post this on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ropeofsilicon/status/459850214036078592 Then, last week I mentioned how I was digging into Werner Herzog's catalog courtesy of Fandor.com as they are releasing 16 of Herzog's titles, one a week, in advance of Shout Factory's release
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

What I Watched, What You Watched #241

This week involved a lot of movies at home, including the new Blu-ray for Double Indemnity, the new Blu-ray for William Friedkin's Sorcerer (read my review here) and, last night, I watched Werner Herzog's Aguirre, the Wrath of God on Fandor.com as I'll be reviewing 16 of Herzog's upcoming movies leading up to Shout Factory's release of Herzog: The Collection Limited Edition on July 29. The set includes Even Dwarfs Started Small, Nosferatu The Vampyre, Land Of Silence And Darkness, Fitzcarraldo, Fata Morgana, Ballad Of Little Soldier, Aguirre, The Wrath Of God, Where The Green Ants Dream, The Enigma Of Kaspar Hauser, Cobra Verde, Heart Of Glass, Lessons Of Darkness, Stroszek, Little Dieter Needs To Fly, Woyzeck and My Best Fiend and Fandor will be releasing one new title each week leading up to the release, each in HD. Of that lot, I've only seen Aguirre and Fitzcarraldo before,
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Watch: 2-Hour Evening With Werner Herzog; Shout Factory Releasing Limited 16-Film 'Herzog: The Collection' Box Set

There are filmmakers and then there's Werner Herzog, with his distinctive, unique form of features and documentaries carving out a special place in cinematic history. His oeuvre is large and you might not know where to begin or how to start. But don't worry, Shout Factory has you covered. The home video company is issuing a limited edition (only 5,000 copies!) box set, "Herzog: The Collection," featuring 16 of his acclaimed films and documentaries, 15 of which are making their Blu-ray debuts. Damn. The movies included are: "Even Dwarfs Started Small," "Land of Silence and Darkness," "Fata Morgana," "Aguirre, the Wrath of God," "The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser," "Heart of Glass," "Stroszek," "Woyzeck," "Nosferatu the Vampyre," "Fitzcarraldo," "Ballad of the Little Soldier," "Where the Green Ants Dream," "Cobra Verde," "Lessons of Darkness," "Little Dieter Needs to Fly" and "My Best Fiend." To hold you over until you can devour those films, here's an extensive,
See full article at The Playlist »

Watch: Trailers For 9 Of The 16 Werner Herzog Films Being Remastered & Reissued By Shout! Factory

The heroes over at Shout! Factory have recently announced that they'll be remastering and releasing 16—count 'em, 16—films by Werner Herzog in several formats both physical and digital. Shout! will be releasing titles chiefly from Herzog's 70s and '80s back catalog, when the Bavaria-born director was still largely working in German (if not necessarily in Germany, jungles feature pretty heavily in some of these pictures), and their list includes both documentaries, shorts and feature films.Per the official announcement, these “include Fitzcarraldo, Aguirre: The Wrath Of God, Nosferatu The Vampyre, The Enigma Of Kaspar Hauser, Woyzeck, Heart Of Glass, Cobra Verde, Stroszek, Fata Morgana, Little Dieter Needs To Fly, Lessons Of Darkness, Ballad Of The Little Soldier, Land Of Silence And Darkness as well as several other acclaimed titles." Anyone with a grasp of counting will conclude that “several” here equals three, and they are: “Where...
See full article at The Playlist »

News: Shout! Factory and Werner Herzog Distribution Deal

Aguirre, The Wrath of God starring Klaus Kinski is one of the films in the Herzog/Shout! Factory agreement.

Shout! Factory and Werner Herzog Film Gmbh have announced an exclusive, multi-picture alliance for 16 Werner Herzog film titles, all of which are currently being re-mastered in high-definition for new edition releases in North America.

This multi-year alliance provides Shout! Factory extensive rights for the films, including digital distribution, home video and broadcast for cross-platform releases. The titles include Fitzcarraldo, Aguirre: The Wrath of God, Nosferatu the Vampyre, The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, Woyzeck, Heart of Glass, Cobra Verde, Stroszek, Fata Morgana, Little Dieter Needs to Fly, Lessons of Darkness, Ballad of the Little Soldier, Land of Silence and Darkness, as well as several other acclaimed titles.

Shout! Factory plans an aggressive rollout of these movies through physical home entertainment releases and a variety of digital entertainment distribution platforms. The label and
See full article at Disc Dish »
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