IMDb > Tom Horn (1980)
Tom Horn
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Tom Horn (1980) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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Director:
Writers:
Thomas McGuane (screenplay) and
Bud Shrake (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for Tom Horn on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
28 March 1980 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
See him before he sees you See more »
Plot:
A renowned former army scout is hired by ranchers to hunt down rustlers but finds himself on trial for... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
a fitting tribute See more (40 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Steve McQueen ... Tom Horn

Linda Evans ... Glendolene Kimmel

Richard Farnsworth ... John C. Coble

Billy Green Bush ... U.S. Marshal Joe Belle

Slim Pickens ... Sheriff Sam Creedmore
Peter Canon ... Assistant Prosecutor

Elisha Cook Jr. ... Stablehand (as Elisha Cook)

Roy Jenson ... Lee Mendenhour
James Kline ... Arlo Chance

Geoffrey Lewis ... Walter Stoll

Harry Northup ... Thomas Burke
Steve Oliver ... 'Gentleman' Jim Corbett
Bill Thurman ... Ora Haley
Bert Williams ... Judge
Bobby Bass ... Corbett's Bodyguard

Mickey Jones ... Brown's Hole Rustler
B.J. Ward ... Cattle Baron
Richard Brewer ... Corbett's Bodyguard

Mel Novak ... Corbett's Bodyguard
Tom Tarpey ... Corbett's Bodyguard
Bob West ... Corbett's Bodyguard
Richard Kennedy ... John Cleveland
Larry Strawbridge ... Ian MacGregor
Pat E. Johnson ... Ora Haley's Bodyguard (as Pat Johnson)
Jim 'Two Dogs' Burgdorf ... Dart
Jerry Wills ... Rash
Walter Wyatt ... Isam
Bob Orrison ... Matt
Fargo Graham ... Auctioneer
Leo Hohler ... Auction Deputy
Erik Owens ... Boy at Auction
Tom Ferguson ... Brown's Hole Rustler
Jos Massangale ... Brown's Hole Rustler
Dave Moordigian ... Brown's Hole Rustler
Michael E. Perry ... Brown's Hole Rustler
Jim Burk ... Slaughter House Man (as Jimmy H. Burk)

Bill Hart ... Slaughter House Man
Dan Corry ... Windmill Man
Jeffrey Meyer ... Gunfighter (as Jeffrey M. Meyer)

Clarke Coleman ... Jimmy Nolt (as Clark Coleman)
Mike Chambers ... Man in Feed Store
Bob Kern ... Man in Feed Store
W.H. Manooch ... Man in Feed Store
Fred O'Dell ... Man in Feed Store
Drummond Barclay ... Charlie Ohnhouse
Chuck Hayward ... Deputy Earl Proctor
Tom Runyon ... Bartender
John L. Hallett ... Reporter
Jerry Jackson ... Reporter
Larry Hollister ... Bailiff
Victor Spelta ... Man in Bar
Jack Wester ... Kid Deputy
Alan L. Brown ... Guard
Robert Elliot ... Guard

Gilbert B. Combs ... Horn's Capturer (as Gilbert Combs)
Mike H. McGaughy ... Horn's Capturer (as Mike McGaughy)

Walter Scott ... Horn's Capturer
Rock A. Walker ... Horn's Capturer
J.P.S. Brown ... Father J.P. Rank
Guido Lollobrigida ... Cowboy (as Lee Barton)
Roe Henson ... Cowboy
Paul Pinnt ... Cowboy
Jimmy Medearis ... Trick Rider (as Jim Medearis)
Chuck Henson ... Steer Roping Sequence
Claude Henson ... Steer Roping Sequence
H.P. Evetts ... Horse Breaking Sequence

Jeff Ramsey ... Horse Breaking Sequence
Bud Stout ... Horse Breaking Sequence
Gary Combs ... Horse Breaking Sequence
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Sonny Skyhawk ... (uncredited)

Directed by
William Wiard 
 
Writing credits
Thomas McGuane (screenplay) and
Bud Shrake (screenplay)

Produced by
Steve McQueen .... executive producer
Michael I. Rachmil .... associate producer (as Michael Rachmil)
Fred Weintraub .... producer
Sandra Weintraub .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Ernest Gold 
 
Cinematography by
John A. Alonzo (director of photography) (as John Alonzo)
 
Film Editing by
George Grenville 
 
Casting by
Sally Dennison 
 
Art Direction by
Ron Hobbs 
 
Set Decoration by
Rick Simpson 
 
Costume Design by
Luster Bayless 
 
Makeup Department
Del Armstrong .... makeup artist
Lon Bentley .... assistant makeup artist
Lynn Del Kail .... hair stylist
 
Production Management
Michael I. Rachmil .... unit production manager (as Michael Rachmil)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Clifford C. Coleman .... assistant director (as Cliff Coleman)
Ed Milkovich .... second assistant director
Robert Rooy .... dga trainee (as Bob Rooy)
 
Art Department
Marty Wunderlich .... property master
 
Sound Department
Robert Glass .... sound re-recording mixer (as Robert J. Glass)
Jerry Jost .... sound
Robert Knudson .... sound re-recording mixer
Don MacDougall .... sound re-recording mixer
William L. Manger .... sound editor (as William Manger)
Richard Oswald .... sound editor
 
Special Effects by
Phil Cory .... special effects (as Phil Corey)
 
Stunts
Gary Combs .... stunt coordinator
Steven Burnett .... stunts (uncredited)
Loren Janes .... stunt double: Steve McQueen (uncredited)
Loren Janes .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Michael A. Chavez .... second assistant camera (as Michael Chavez)
Dave Friedman .... still photographer
Bud Heller .... key grip
Horace Jordan .... first assistant camera
James Plannette .... gaffer (as Jim Plannette)
John Toll .... camera operator
R. Michael De Chellis .... electrician (uncredited)
 
Casting Department
Frank Kennedy .... extras casting (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Michael Castellano .... wardrobe assistant (as Mike Castellano)
Betsy Heimann .... costumer: women
Charles E. James .... costumer: men
 
Editorial Department
Larry Grenville .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
John Mick .... music editor
Aaron Rochin .... score mixer
 
Transportation Department
Ed Arter .... transportation captain
 
Other crew
Dixie J. Capp .... production coordinator (as Dixie Capp)
Susan Elkins .... assistant to producer (as Susie Ekins)
Trixie Flynn .... secretary to producer (as Trixie Flynn Calfa)
Gordon K. Kee .... production auditor (as Gordon Kee)
Chad McQueen .... assistant to producer
Ray Quiroz .... script supervisor
Rudy Ugland .... head wrangler
'Chema' Hernandez .... head wrangler (uncredited)
Jim McCarthy .... assistant auditor (uncredited)
Jack N. Young .... location scout (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
98 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:M | Canada:PG (Ontario) | Finland:K-16 | Germany:12 (DVD rating) | Iceland:12 | Netherlands:12 (orginal rating) | Norway:16 | Singapore:PG | Spain:13 | UK:AA (original rating) (cut) | UK:15 (video rating) (cut) | USA:R | West Germany:12 (f)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
When Gary Combs tested the replica gallows trapdoor system, the "Peter Pan" safety cable broke, causing him to suffer a rope burn on his neck when the breakaway knot released, saving his life.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: In the opening sequence, the wording says, "In 1901 he drifted into Wyoming 'Territory'". Wyoming had been a state since 1890.See more »
Quotes:
Tom Horn:Listen, why are you hangin' around with me?
Glendolene Kimmel:Because you are a link to the Old West.
Tom Horn:If you really knew how dirty and raggedy-assed the Old West was, you wouldn't want any part of it.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Times Square (1980)See more »

FAQ

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23 out of 35 people found the following review useful.
a fitting tribute, 20 August 2003
Author: w. t. benda from austin, texas

The film is distinctive in four ways, the first being that Steve McQueen finally returned to the screen after having spent the 1970s elsewhere. He was a bounty hunter in the late 1950s on television, then jumped to prominence in "The Magnificent Seven" about 1960 and spent the next ten years as a dominant force on-screen. So this film was a "comeback." But McQueen came back as an artist, not as a cartoon version of his earlier self. His portrayal of Tom Horn does not use close-ups, quick draws or choreographed violence. The second thing that stands out here is the subject of the film, which is frontier justice on the high plains, a rough subject to be sure. "Tom Horn" (1980) is the first movie since "Shane" (1953) to deal realistically with the subject a part of which treatment is using the countryside itself as a character. There were a lot of movies beginning in the late 1960s with Clint Eastwood's "spaghetti westerns" which focused on the grisly righteousness of law enforcement, but it wasn't until Eastwood's "Unforgiven" (1998) that he finally made a movie that approached the quality of "Shane" and "Tom Horn," and employed some panoramic camera work. Third, the way the story is told is unfamiliar to most modern movie fans because it is so old, traditional and specific to the northern plains. The story is told, by veteran Western director Wiard, in the same way author Albert White Eagle tells stories, as a montage of contrasting fragments often out of chrnonolgical order -- "oh, by the way, I forget to tell you something, let me tack it on now" -- the juxtaposition of which fragments imply the surreal ambience of the times, an ambience which could not be effectively shown using the usual plot devices, cinematic close-ups, narrative summaries and chronological markers. For example, we see Tom in a jail cell looking at the clouds outside the little window, then we see him, with the same clouds in the sky behind him, shooting a young man (uncredited actor Sonny Skyhawk) who tries to kill the school marm as she bathes in the horse trough while talking with Tom. Is this something that really happened before he was locked up, or is it a fantasy or dream born of incarceration? It doesn't matter whether the scene is real or imagined, what matters is the jolt we receive by seeing it out of sequence. Most directors would have either shown Tom going to sleep in the cell, thus implying the scene was a dream, or would have had some narrative dialogue which indicated that Tom was remembering something that had really transpired. But Wiard, throughout the film, uses that northern technique. Another example is when we are visually escorted out of a scene in which Tom kills a rustler, with beautiful mountains in the background, into one where he is breaking a horse for the schoolmarm to eventually ride -- the same mountains are in the background, unchanged. A final thing about this movie was actor Richard Farnsworth. This was the first movie in which he had considerable dialogue, and was given a chance to demonstrate his skill at characterization. He plays John Coble, Tom Horn's employer. At the end of the movie is a 1904 quote from Coble, saying that that Tom was not guilty of the crime of which he was accused and convicted. This quotation, as Western researchers know, is from Coble's suicide note. And it foreshadowed Farnsworth's sucide twenty-two years later, a few months after being nominated, finally, for an Academy Award for his brilliant portrayal in "The Straight Story." McQueen, on-screen, and Farnsworth, on-screen and off, epitomized that quality of the Westerner least understood by people in the rest of the nation. The real Tom Horn said, "The people in the Northeast hire us to protect them from the people in the South," and, "We find the thing, whatever it is, then somebody else gets the glory for bringing it down, and somebody else makes the money for taking it back to the folks in town," but "You can either laugh or cry at your fate, and that's not much of a choice, is it, pardner?" The droll stocism and sardonic wit of the cowboy, and the western tracker whether white or Indian, has always enchanted and mystified the rest of the nation, and never really been understood. The movie, "Tom Horn," is a fitting tribute to the history and people of the northern plains, to Steve McQueen's artistry, to the memory of Richard Farnsworth, and to stories that are not easy to tell.

w. t. benda

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