IMDb > Scum (1979) > News
Scum
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
Scum (1979) More at IMDbPro »


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

1-20 of 21 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


Alan Clarke and Alkaseltzer - A Conversation with Down Terrace's Ben Wheatley

11 November 2010 9:32 AM, PST | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Winning accolades and fans across the festival circuit for the past year, and comparisons to material as far and wide as Ken Loach and The Sopranos (although in all fairness it is neither of those things, more like deader-than-deadpan Coen Brothers absurdity) Down Terrace has been playing in limited release for a month, and is opening in Canada commercially at the Carlton Theatre in Toronto (before expanding out to Vancouver) November 12th.  I have been shamelessly been sitting on a lengthy chat with writer/director Ben Wheatley while the film played at the Fantasia Film Festival back in July.  He left his copy of Sight & Sound behind as he took off to the airport after our conversation, which I scored (snack-cake!) but don't tell him.  A prolific advertisement and TV director, he is as film literate and verbose has one would expect from a genre-mashing drama/comedy/gangster picture with literate and verbose characters. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Splintered | Film review

4 September 2010 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A young woman tormented by nightmares about being frightened and abused as a child drags along three reluctant, disagreeable chums to investigate a cannibalistic creature on the loose in North Wales. They come across an abandoned but not deserted orphanage in the woods and mayhem ensues. After hanging around for a couple of years this indifferent horror flick is getting a brief cinematic release before going to DVD where, if anywhere, it belongs. It's the final film of the British independent producer Clive Parsons, the ex-barrister and co-author of a bestselling schools Latin vocabulary book. He's better remembered for such movies as Scum, Gregory's Girl and Britannia Hospital.

HorrorPhilip French

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2010 | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds »

- Philip French

Permalink | Report a problem


Winstone Headbutted Film Boss

3 September 2010 5:01 AM, PDT | WENN | See recent WENN news »

British movie hardman Ray Winstone almost ruined his acting career after he headbutted a director who physically moved him during a scene.

The Sexy Beast star made his name playing a teenage thug in harrowing British drama film Scum, before winning a string of tough-guy roles on the big screen.

Winstone admits his violent persona wasn't restricted to his acting - he got into several fights with co-stars, and he even headbutted a film-maker while working as an extra.

He tells Britain's The Guardian, "I mean, I was punching people and everything. They deserved it, don't worry. A couple of things happened on set where I thought people were rude and that, and they got a clump. I remember years ago I was an extra, just an extra, and instead of asking me to move - he was a big fella - the director just picked me up and moved me. And I headbutted him. You know, he shouldn't have done that, but I shouldn't have done that either. I just done it." »

Permalink | Report a problem


Ray Winstone: 'I used to be a raving lunatic'

2 September 2010 1:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Ray Winstone plays troubled hardmen with such conviction, it's easy to believe he's not acting. He talks about his violent past, happy-go-lucky nature and love of westerns

According to an old Fleet Street adage, it is a bad idea to interview your heroes. As I don't have very many, however, the situation seldom arises. But the warning began to make sense while I was getting ready to meet Ray Winstone, for it's hard not to be at least a bit in love with him. So if he turned out to be a twit, I worried, it would be disproportionately upsetting.

Winstone is the East End's answer to George Clooney – the opposite of a luvvie, unaffected and occasionally ungovernable, the kind of man with whom men want to get drunk, and women want to sleep. Haunting performances as a wife-beater in Nil by Mouth, and a retired robber in Sexy Beast, »

- Decca Aitkenhead

Permalink | Report a problem


'I used to be a raving lunatic'

2 September 2010 1:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Ray Winstone plays troubled hardmen with such conviction, it's easy to believe he's not acting. He talks about his violent past, happy-go-lucky nature and love of westerns

According to an old Fleet Street adage, it is a bad idea to interview your heroes. As I don't have very many, however, the situation seldom arises. But the warning began to make sense while I was getting ready to meet Ray Winstone, for it's hard not to be at least a bit in love with him. So if he turned out to be a twit, I worried, it would be disproportionately upsetting.

Winstone is the East End's answer to George Clooney – the opposite of a luvvie, unaffected and occasionally ungovernable, the kind of man with whom men want to get drunk, and women want to sleep. Haunting performances as a wife-beater in Nil by Mouth, and a retired robber in Sexy Beast, »

- Decca Aitkenhead

Permalink | Report a problem


Dog Pound | Film review

28 August 2010 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Kim Chapiron's unrevealing account of three teenagers having terrible times in a youth correctional centre in Montana is a Franco-Canadian remake of Scum, a TV play about the violent, dead-end absurdities of borstal life, directed by the gifted British realist Alan Clarke from a script by Ray Minton and famously withdrawn by a shocked BBC and remade as a low-budget picture. The film lacks the narrative clarity and moral complexity of Clarke's film and ends up clamorous, dislocated and pointless.

DramaPhilip French

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2010 | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds »

- Philip French

Permalink | Report a problem


This week's new films

27 August 2010 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Maid (15)

(Sebastián Silva, 2009, Chile) Catalina Saavedra, Claudia Celedón, Mariana Loyola. 96 mins

Less a slice of upstairs-downstairs realism than a black comedy that threatens to turn into a horror movie, this Chilean drama has been scooping awards across the globe, mostly for Saavedra's acting. She's a bravely monstrous creation, a long-suffering help whose resentments rise to the boil, particularly when a younger assistant is foisted on her. But just when we're ready to write her off, this agile, low-budget drama turns it round and confronts us with our own heartlessness. That's us served.

Scott Pilgrim Vs The World (12A)

(Edgar Wright, 2010 Us) Michael Cera, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Ellen Wong. 112 mins

This tireless tale of modern loserdom, filtered through pop-culture consciousness, will push the buttons of younger fans, with its onslaught of music/comic book/videogame tricks and hipster humour. Older viewers may need a lie down.

The Girl Who Played With Fire (15)

(Daniel Alfredson, »

- The guide

Permalink | Report a problem


This week's new films

20 August 2010 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Mother (15)

(Bong Joon-ho, 2009, S Korea) Kim Hye-ja, Won Bin, Jin Ku, Yoon Jae-Moon. 130 mins

After his mutant tadpole movie The Host, Bong brings us another Korean monster: a middle-aged herbalist with a will of steel and some serious overprotection issues. Her simple-minded son has been fitted up for a schoolgirl's murder, and in a society of inept cops, exploitative lawyers and generally corrupt townsfolk, only mommie dearest believes he's innocent – and sets out to prove it. It's a mystery thriller to make Hitchcock proud, and a delectably warped parable of blood running thicker than water.

The Expendables (15)

(Sylvester Stallone, 2010, Us) Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham, Dolph Lundgren, Jet Li. 104 mins

Now that the 80s beefcake reunion has actually happened, does anyone care? Probably enough to make this a guilty-pleasure night out, and that's all it really asks for. With a last surge of testosterone coursing through their wrinkled physiques, our senior »

- The guide

Permalink | Report a problem


Scum holds the key to Dog Pound's prison power | Danny Leigh

13 August 2010 7:01 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Dog Pound is just one in a long line of prison flicks that owes a debt to the fierce political savvy of Alan Clarke

Ah, what joy it is to settle back into the plush comfort of a cinema seat and breathe the heady scent of stale sweat, slop buckets and fear. That's assuming, of course, that you enjoy the prison movie, that enduring sub-genre which offers audiences the chance to experience stories of Darwinian survivals of the fittest while generally remaining free of the risk of being shanked on their way to the laundry room.

For the connoisseur of the form, the latest entry is Dog Pound, to be released in the lazy last days of the summer schedule. Director Kim Chapiron's blistering tale of three ordinary(ish) American teens in juvenile detention is, however, anything but wilted. A semi-remake of the late Alan Clarke's borstal masterpiece Scum, »

- Danny Leigh

Permalink | Report a problem


New Dog Pound Poster

3 August 2010 3:13 AM, PDT | EmpireOnline | See recent EmpireOnline news »

If there's one thing more likely to leave you staggering dazed from the cinema than a brutally uncompromising prison drama - Bronson, Hunger, A Prophet take a bow - it's an uncompromising juvenile prison drama, with extra levels of searing vérité provided by a cast partly made up of real-life inmates. Step forward, then, Dog Pound and its suitably bruising new quad poster.Inspired in part by Alan Clarke's '70s borstal-set Scum, Dog Pound tells the story of three young inmates at Montana's Enola Vale Youth Correctional Center. As the title implies, it's a dog-eat-dog world for drug dealer Davis (Shane Kippel), car thief Angel (Mateo Morales) and violent tearaway Butch (Adam Butcher). Each learns the hard way that lock-up isn't quite what they remember from old episodes of Porridge.Dog Pound is the handiwork of 20 year-old Parisian Kim Chapiron, whose debut, Faustian horror Sheitan, saw him bring »

Permalink | Report a problem


Elephant Eye Locks Up Kim Chapiron's 'Dog Pound'

22 June 2010 3:35 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Elephant Eye Films - the distributor who grabbed the rights to The Maid (their sole release in 2009) and turned in a crazy profit of over half a million dollars at the specialty box office, will make the same concentrated effort with French filmmaker Kim Chapiron's Dog Pound - think Audiard's A Prophet but with teens. - Elephant Eye Films - the distributor who grabbed the rights to The Maid (their sole release in 2009) and turned in a crazy profit of over half a million dollars at the specialty box office, will make the same concentrated effort with French filmmaker Kim Chapiron's Dog Pound - think Audiard's A Prophet but with teens.  Inspired by Alan Clarke's BBC telepic "Scum", Dog Pound follows three young inmates who toughen up in a juvenile correctional facility located in Montana. Davis, 16 years old: possession of narcotics with intent to resell. Angel, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Elephant Eye Locks Up Kim Chapiron's 'Dog Pound'

22 June 2010 6:50 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Elephant Eye Films - the distributor who grabbed the rights to The Maid (their sole release in 2009) and turned in a crazy profit of over half a million dollars at the specialty box office, will make the same concentrated effort with French filmmaker Kim Chapiron's Dog Pound - think Audiard's A Prophet but with teens.  Inspired by Alan Clarke's BBC telepic "Scum", Dog Pound follows three young inmates who toughen up in a juvenile correctional facility located in Montana. Davis, 16 years old: possession of narcotics with intent to resell. Angel, 15 years old: assault and autotheft. Butch, 17 years old: assault on a correctional officer. The same sentence: Enola Vale youth correctional facility. On arriving at the correctional facility they have to pick a side: victim or executioner. Our own Melissa Silvestri covered the film at Tribeca and said "Dog Pound works because the dialogue is genuine, and the feeling »

Permalink | Report a problem


The 10 best prison films

29 May 2010 4:05 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Caspar Walsh, ex-convict, journalist and author of the memoir Criminal, chooses his favourites, from Steve McQueen's PoW classic to Jacques Audiard's stark modern masterpiece

The Great Escape 1963

A soft-focus dramatisation of the largely unsuccessful mass escape from the Stalag Luft III prison camp during the second world war. On first viewing, I was mesmerised by the downtrodden military heroics of 1960s icons of cool Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson and James Coburn. The director, John Sturges, unashamedly Americanised the tragic, death-heavy, real-life prison break, and brought the resulting massacre, cited at the Nuremberg trials, to the wider world's attention. Truth or fiction, it embodied the hope and ingenuity that ended the war to end all wars.

The Hill 1965

Starring Sean Connery and Ian Bannen, Sidney Lumet's stifling black-and-white prison flick won the Bafta for best cinematography and the Writers' Guild award for best screenplay. British soldiers are held »

- Caspar Walsh

Permalink | Report a problem


Tribeca 2010: Dog Pound Review

26 April 2010 4:00 PM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

[ Once again, props go to Joshua Chaplinksy for this review ]

Four Years ago, a bizarre little film called Sheitan made me a fan of director Kim Chapiron for life. It starred Vincent Cassel as a demented hillbilly who makes a Faustian deal with the devil in what I consider to be one of the best horror films of the aughts. I missed its premiere at the 2006 Tribeca Film Festival, but was lucky enough to discover it on DVD. This year, Chapiron returns to the fest with his highly anticipated (by me) followup, the hardcore juvie prison drama, Dog Pound.

Based on the 1979 Alan Clarke film, Scum, Dog Pound jacks its inspiration like a fresh pair of kicks and will fuck you up if you snitch. Updating the action to present day middle-America, the loose narrative follows three inmates in a juvenile detention center as they attempt to keep their heads down and their noses clean.

Easier said than done.

There »

Permalink | Report a problem


Weekend Weirdness Review: Tony - London Serial Killer

11 April 2010 5:28 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

It’s a crazy, mixed up world and we are thankful for movies that offer proof. Slashfilm’s Weekend Weirdness examines such flicks, whether in the form of a premiere for a provocative indie, a mini review of a film about a murderous nerd, or an interview. Another week, another serial killer film. The British import, Tony, follows the fictional killer in its title---a Londoner who resembles a malnourished Milton from Office Space---across several days and several murders. It’s not uncommon for filmmakers to focus on a mass murderer to boldly address social undercurrents or the culture at large and newcomer Gerard Johnson is content to follow. In his interview with /Film, Johnson dismissed the horror genre altogether to describe Tony, preferring to call it a “social realist thriller” and referencing Alan Clarke, the late master of violent, blue collar English cinema (Scum, Made in Britain). But there »

- Hunter Stephenson

Permalink | Report a problem


Tribeca Film Festival 2010 Preview: Kim Chapiron’s Dog Pound

8 April 2010 8:58 PM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Tonight, for our Tribeca film preview, we’re presenting the trailer for Kim Chapiron’s Dog Pound. The film presents a look inside the violent and charged world of a youth detention facility, and if this trailer is an indication as to the overall feel of the film, it looks like a lot of fun. Perhaps not as ponderous, or gut wrenching as the recent Criterion release, Hunger, but there is definitely a strong artistic eye behind the camera on Dog Pound.

Dog Pound will be screening on April 24th, 25th, 27th, and May 1st. For a complete list of screening times and locations, visit the official Tribeca page for the film. To learn more about the film, and stay up to date, you can become a fan of the film on Facebook, follow the film’s Twitter feed, the directors Twitter, or visit the official homepage here.

Again, be »

- Ryan Gallagher

Permalink | Report a problem


Exclusive Interview with 'Tony' Director, Gerard Johnson

5 April 2010 10:03 AM, PDT | QuietEarth.us | See recent QuietEarth news »

I met Gerard at the Filmhouse Cafe for a chat about his psychological, thriller, horror film, 'Tony', which debuted at this years Eiff. Our table got quite a lot of action as we'd sat next to a shelf of free books, you'll see. Check out Tony as soon as you can, it's a very weird and creepy film. You can read my review, which gave it 8/10, here on quietearth.

Simon: One of the first things I want to ask you is, how you would describe 'Tony' in your own words? It's written in the Eiff catalogue as being a horror comedy, but how'd you describe it?

Gerard Johnson: Yeah, I'd describe it more as a character study, but it's kind of about a lonely lost character. I'd describe it as a social-realist horror comedy, or I should say, a social-realist black horror comedy. It's hard to categorize really, which is a strong point. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Winstone Thankful For Acting Success

13 January 2010 12:06 AM, PST | WENN | See recent WENN news »

British actor Ray Winstone is relieved his career as an actor took off - because he would have had to resort to a life of crime to feed his family.

The hardman actor made his mark on the British film industry when he starred in 1979 cult classic Scum, depicting the life of an incarcerated juvenile delinquent.

And the star insists his life could have mirrored the film - because he didn't have any other talents to fall back on.

He tells Britain's Zoo magazine, "I wasn't good enough to be a footballer or a pop star. And I couldn't have been a career criminal because I'd have probably got caught!

"To be honest, I'd probably be f**ked. I'd find it very difficult to do physical, manual labour now. I was putting out market stalls with my dad when I was 12 and that was fine, but I haven't done that since. I'm 52 now, I've got three kids and a wife, so I'd have to do something. It looks like I'd be getting the old balaclava out!" »

Permalink | Report a problem


Sheitan's Kim Chapiron Heads To Juvie With Dog Pound

12 January 2010 7:54 AM, PST | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Is it a remake or isn't it?  Alan Clarke's 1979 juvie crime drama Scum - starring a young Ray Winstone - certainly appears to be a major influence on Dog Pound, the latest from Sheitan director Kim Chapiron.  But if this is meant to be an outright remake nobody is coming right out and saying so, with the closest anybody is coming to saying so being international sales outfit The Wild Bunch saying the film merges "the violent intensity of The Lord Of The Flies and Scum [with] the emotional power of One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest."

But, regardless, the first trailer for the film - Chapiron's English language debut - has arrived and can be seen below.

»

Permalink | Report a problem


Winstone, Hurt and Berkoff – is that all you've got?

8 January 2010 4:08 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

44 Inch Chest stars Deadwood's Ian McShane alongside a who's-who of British beefcake, but who would make John Patterson's dream team of UK movie hard men?

I have to admit I like the look of 44 Inch Chest, and particularly its wall-to-wall cast of British hard men: Ray Winstone, Ian McShane, Steven Berkoff and John Hurt.

John Hurt, you say, a British tough guy? Well, it's all about stunt-casting here; almost every major piece of casting works because somewhere in each actor's back catalogue is at least one meaty outing as a nasty piece of work brandishing a gun. For Hurt it was Stephen Frears's mid-80s Spanish revenger's road-movie The Hit.

Ian McShane is actually a two-stage piece of stunt casting. When he was cast as the ambi-sexual crime lord in Sexy Beast, the film-makers were referencing his role as Richard Burton's gangland catamite in Villain (1971), and »

- John Patterson

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

1-20 of 21 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners