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Scum (1979) More at IMDbPro »


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

4 items from 2016


David Bowie in Baal, Alan Clarke's 1982 Bertolt Brecht adaptation – video

9 June 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

In 1982, Scum director Alan Clarke cast David Bowie in an adaptation of Bertolt Brecht’s early play for the BBC. Baal was Brecht’s first full length play, written in 1918 (reworked in 1926). Bowie stars as the title character, an outcast poet/musician who has a series of affairs and is involved in a killing. Bowie, who had recently performed in The Elephant Man on Broadway, acted and sang the lead role, alongside a cast that included Jonathan Kent and Zoë Wanamaker. This exclusive clip comprises the first full minute of the film, including the “ichthyosaurus” monologue and the first two verses of Bowie’s rendition of Baal’s Hymn.

Baal is included in the Blu-ray box set Dissent and Disruption: Alan Clarke at the BBC (1969-1989) and in the DVD box set Alan Clarke at the BBC, Volume 2: Disruption (1978-1989), out this week1982 archive article: Nancy Banks-Smith’s »

- Guardian Staff

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David Bowie in Baal, Alan Clarke's 1982 Bertolt Brecht adaptation – video

9 June 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

In 1982, Scum director Alan Clarke cast David Bowie in an adaptation of Bertolt Brecht’s early play for the BBC. Baal was Brecht’s first full length play, written in 1918 (reworked in 1926). Bowie stars as the title character, an outcast poet/musician who has a series of affairs and is involved in a killing. Bowie, who had recently performed in The Elephant Man on Broadway, acted and sang the lead role, alongside a cast that included Jonathan Kent and Zoë Wanamaker. This exclusive clip comprises the first full minute of the film, including the “ichthyosaurus” monologue and the first two verses of Bowie’s rendition of Baal’s Hymn.

Baal is included in the Blu-ray box set Dissent and Disruption: Alan Clarke at the BBC (1969-1989) and in the DVD box set Alan Clarke at the BBC, Volume 2: Disruption (1978-1989), out this week1982 archive article: Nancy Banks-Smith’s »

- Guardian Staff

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BFI Review – Contact (1985) and Elephant (1989)

28 April 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Contact, 1985 and Elephant, 1989.

Directed by Alan Clarke.

Synopsis:

Two films reflecting on the 1980’s in Northern Ireland.

 

Alan Clarke, director of Scum and The Firm, is a director of men. These could be men in prisons or aggressive, violent offenders keen to tattoo swastikas on their foreheads, as he did in Made in Britain. The BFI, in their retrospective of Clarkes’ films this month exhibited a double bill showcasing two films that revel in the conflict of male dominance in very different ways. They share the setting of Northern Ireland, but with perspectives of two striking definitions of warfare.

Contact, directed by Clarke in 1985, is a thoughtful observation on the military in rural Northern Ireland, near Dundalk (we can assume from the few moments of conversation made). A team is based in a small, cramp accommodation and the Platoon Commander (Sean Chapman) has a room that could barely be a back cupboard. »

- Simon Columb

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The Most Influential British Director You’ve Never Heard Of

27 March 2016 3:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

This week Neil Calloway looks at the career of an overlooked director…

Imagine a director who gave early roles to Ray Winstone, Tim Roth and Gary Oldman, who had a film remade by Gus Van Sant, who gave Danny Boyle one of his first producing credits, and who inspired Paul Greengrass.

Alan Clarke was that director, and though he has gone sadly underappreciated, a new season of his films at the British Film Institute, as well as a re-release of his work on blu-ray and DVD, should go some way to restoring his reputation.

Clarke worked largely in television, making the sort of standalone films that gave Mike Leigh and Ken Loach their breaks but are sadly absent from TV nowadays. His films dealt with glue sniffing Neo Nazis, yuppies, football hooligans and the futile cycle of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland; in short, these weren’t the big screen »

- Neil Calloway

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

4 items from 2016


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