7.6/10
8,125
94 user 37 critic

Scum (1979)

An uncompromising story of life in a British juvenile offender institution in the 70's.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
John Blundell ...
...
John Fowler ...
Woods
Ray Burdis ...
Eckersley
Patrick Murray ...
Dougan
Herbert Norville ...
Toyne
George Winter ...
Rhodes
Alrick Riley ...
Angel
Peter Francis ...
Philip DaCosta ...
Jackson (as Philip Da Costa)
Perry Benson ...
Formby
...
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Storyline

An uncompromising story of life in a British juvenile offender institution in the 70's.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

In borstal survival rules! See more »

Genres:

Crime | Drama

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

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Language:

Release Date:

28 September 1979 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Escoria  »

Filming Locations:

 »

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Box Office

Budget:

£250,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Eastmancolor) (uncredited)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The Australian DVD sleeve notes state that this film was "one of the most controversial films ever made in the UK and one which caused a furore when it was first screened on television". See more »

Goofs

When Carlin is being told to eat his breakfast and the chant begins, the scene moves along the dining hall and a crew member in a grey jacket operating a camera can be seen briefly in the top right hand corner. See more »

Quotes

Meakin: Up your fucking borstal!
See more »

Connections

References Nanook of the North (1922) See more »

Soundtracks

Badly Bruised - Slightly Stowed
(uncredited)
Written by Colin Tucker
De Wolfe Music Ltd
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Mecca, Archer?
11 June 2005 | by See all my reviews

The grandaddy of 'incarceration' films - this is one of the best, oft copied but never bettered.

I liked it because it's so damn British. The one liners are legion; you all know what they are and where, but among a stellar list 'Mecca, Archer' rises just above and never fails to have me in fits. The way Goodyear looks at the Governor just after this great outburst is also revealing; as is the look of satisfaction on Archer's face when he finally succeeds in riling the 'religious maniac'.

Of course, there's a serious message in here; expedited best in the conversation between Archer and Mr Duke over 'coffee'. Analysing the situation, as Archer attempts to do, will simply not be tolerated and is interpreted as dissent by a man who embodies the 'system' and is intellectually and emotionally unequipped to deal with his own, and the State's ultimate failure to deliver.

Like true class acts, this film works on several levels; it's a no nonsense drama bedecked with Taj Mahal one liners everyone loves, yet it also works on a deeper level; you cannot punitively 'correct' all offenders with violence and cruelty. You are not corrected, you are merely broken, as Davis and Toyne are. If you're not broken, you run amok, but the point is you're not 'cured'.

When this film was on TV in 1983, just after Channel Four started broadcasting, they edited the notorious potting shed sequence to such an extent that the heinous act committed was virtually excised, thereby diluting the dramatic effect to virtually zero. Interestingly enough, they also edited out the bit where Mr Greaves ignores Davis' second press of the bell. Why? Presumably because they feared the ire of the State at the highlighting of its inadequacies? I suppose they can be forgiven, Channel Four was new then after all, but it's quite revealing nonetheless.

If I'm home alone, I quote this film as I'm wandering around the house. I don't quite know why. It's all about the importance of individuality, standing up for yourself and not just 'accepting' things. That's probably the reason. Now, where's your tool?


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