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Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979) Poster

Trivia

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Klaus Kinski had to spend approximately four hours per day in make-up. Fresh latex ear pieces had to be poured for each day of shooting because they were destroyed at removal. Kinski, notorious for his violent daily temper-tantrums, had a very good relationship to Japanese make-up artist Reiko Kruk and was exceedingly patient and well-behaved during make-up.
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The scene where Nosferatu arrives in the city required thousands of grey rats. Real grey rats were unavailable and therefore white ones were painted grey and used instead.
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As this movie was made long after the copyright to Bram Stoker's Dracula had expired, Werner Herzog decided to restore the original names of the characters, while still following the movie blueprint laid out by F.W. Murnau's Nosferatu (1922).
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Werner Herzog cast Roland Topor as Renfield after seeing him in a French TV show. He had been greatly impressed with the crazy, utterly desperate laugh with which Topor had concluded his every statement on that show. Reprising the laugh in Nosferatu, it is much more pronounced in the English version of the film than the German.
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The movie was shot with actors speaking German, and dubbed into English for the international version. Minor differences occur in the international edit, but according to Herzog only one film exists.
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The characters Mina and Lucy have their roles reversed from what they were in the Bram Stoker novel.
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Procuring rats for the film proved difficult, though the production eventually procured a large quantity from a scientific research facility. When shipped to Holland for filming, a customs inspector reportedly fainted upon opening their crate and discovering its contents. In addition to the notorious dye job the rats had to endure, each had to undergo spaying or neutering to control their breeding. Animal rights activists have also alleged that the rats were underfed and actually began to eat one another during production.
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The whole crew comprised 16 people - twice as many as Werner Herzog had when he shot Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972).
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The exceedingly difficult slow-motion shots of a bat in flight were not shot by Werner Herzog's crew but borrowed from a scientific documentary.
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The coach that picks up Harker at the Borgo pass was a real hearse that was actually still in use in Bulgaria at the time of the shoot.
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Production designer Henning von Gierke, also an accomplished chef who enjoyed cooking for the crew, prepared the food for the breakfast shot himself.
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One of five Dracula movies made and released around 1979. The films are Dracula (1979), Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979), Love at First Bite (1979), Nocturna (1979) and Graf Dracula (beißt jetzt) in Oberbayern (1979). Also from 1979 were the vampire movies Thirst (1979) and Salem's Lot (1979).
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Werner Herzog has said that he feels that the original Nosferatu (1922) is the greatest of all German films. He made this comment in a radio interview with Terry Gross in 1998.
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Cameo 

Beverly Walker:  as a nun.
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Director Cameo 

Werner Herzog:  the person who sticks his foot into the coffin and gets his toe bitten by a rat.
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