5.2/10
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50 user 15 critic

More American Graffiti (1979)

PG | | Comedy, Drama, War | 3 August 1979 (USA)
College graduates deal with Vietnam and other issues of the late '60s.

Director:

(as B.W.L. Norton)

Writers:

(as B.W.L. Norton), (based on characters created by) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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...
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Eva
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John Brent ...
Ralph
Country Joe McDonald ...
Country Joe and the Fish
Barry Melton ...
Country Joe and the Fish (as Barry 'the Fish' Melton)
Robert Hogins ...
Country Joe and the Fish
Robert Flurie ...
Country Joe and the Fish
Peter Albin ...
Country Joe and the Fish
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Storyline

College graduates deal with Vietnam and other issues of the late '60s.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The sights and sounds of the '60s. There were bittersweet times. There were funny times. And it was all unforgettable. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | War

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

3 August 1979 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Purple Haze  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$15,014,674
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

,  »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

An uncredited Marcia Lucas edited the split-screen scenes for the 1966 sequence (many of which were incorporated to cover up the story defects). George Lucas, also uncredited, edited the Vietnam scenes for the 1965 sequence, making footage of just two helicopters seem like a dozen. See more »

Goofs

The final account of the characters states that Terry was reported missing in action in Vietnam. However he staged his death so that his superiors believe he was blown to bits at a specific place and time. Thus he would be reported KIA (killed in action), not missing in action. See more »

Quotes

Felix: Bobby, whatever you do, don't hit those trashcans!
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Crazy Credits

The guitar strum, from Bob Dylan's How Does it Feel? brings forth the first few end credits of the film. See more »

Connections

Follows American Graffiti (1973) See more »

Soundtracks

Stop in the Name of Love
Written by Lamont Dozier, Brian Holland and Eddie Holland
Performed by The Supremes
Courtesy of Motown Record Corporation
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User Reviews

 
Unnecessary, Nearly Unwatchable Sequel
15 July 2004 | by See all my reviews

The final frames of the original "American Graffiti" provide one-line summaries of the fates of the film's four central male characters. While somewhat sexist in omitting the female characters, the ending of the original film provided all the information about those people that even the most ardent fan of the movie would want. However, someone felt that mega-bucks could be made by detailing the dreary lives of these characters after the original film ended. Bad move. Making an insurance salesman and his wife, a nerdy private in Vietnam, a drag race driver, and a overgrown hippie into interesting characters in interesting situations was far beyond the talents of those who wrote this nearly unwatchable movie. While most of the original cast is back, with only Richard Dreyfuss having the good sense to stay away, "More American Graffiti" is a mess of silly situations that involve protests, car races, country singers, and the Vietnam war. The use of split screens, once thought innovative and daring, is overused here to the point of distraction and adds confusion to the already confused goings one. This is a sequel that demonstrates nearly everything that can go wrong with a sequel. Perhaps it should be screened in film schools as a lesson. Even the use of period music, which was a delight in the original, is poorly done here. If you want more "American Graffiti," see the original twice.


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