47 user 19 critic

The Kids Are Alright (1979)

From the early black and white days to their colourful hedonistic era, you will Rock! See them at their most creative, and destructive, and experience The Who: Here!




On Disc

at Amazon

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Documentary | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.4/10 X  

This is the film of The Who's appearance at the third (and final) Isle of Wight festival in 1970. This is regarded as the band's finest performance.

Director: Murray Lerner
Stars: Roger Daltrey, John Entwistle, Keith Moon
Documentary | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

A documentary on The Who, featuring interviews with the band's two surviving members, Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey.

Directors: Paul Crowder, Murray Lerner, and 1 more credit »
Stars: Roger Daltrey, Pete Townshend, John Entwistle
Documentary | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Originally filmed in December 1968, "The Rock and Roll Circus" was originally intended to be released as a television special. The special was filmed over two nights and featured not only ... See full summary »

Director: Michael Lindsay-Hogg
Stars: Ian Anderson, Glenn Cornick, Clive Bunker
Tommy (1975)
Drama | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

A psychosomatically deaf, dumb and blind boy becomes a master pinball player and, subsequently, the object of a religious cult.

Director: Ken Russell
Stars: Roger Daltrey, Ann-Margret, Oliver Reed
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.5/10 X  
Director: Jeff Stein
Stars: Roger Daltrey, John Entwistle, Keith Moon
Quadrophenia (1979)
Drama | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

London, 1965: Like many other youths, Jimmy hates the philistine life, especially his parents and his job in a company's mailing division. Only when he's together with his friends, a 'Mod' ... See full summary »

Director: Franc Roddam
Stars: Phil Daniels, Leslie Ash, Phil Davis
Monterey Pop (1968)
Documentary | History | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

A film about the greatest pre-Woodstock rock music festival.

Director: D.A. Pennebaker
Stars: Otis Redding, Jimi Hendrix, Ravi Shankar
Woodstock (1970)
Documentary | History | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

The film chronicle of the legendary 1969 music festival.

Director: Michael Wadleigh
Stars: Joan Baez, Richie Havens, Roger Daltrey
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.6/10 X  

Live At Woodstock features all of the existing film footage from Jimi's unforgettable August, 1969, Woodstock concert newly re-edited and presented uninterrupted in its original performance sequence.

Director: Michael Wadleigh
Stars: Billy Cox, Jimi Hendrix, Larry Lee
Documentary | Action | Adventure
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

Throughout history, Alaska has been a place of dreams. From the early gold rush days, to the rise of commercial fishing, to the explosion of the ski and snowboard freeride movement, people ... See full summary »

Stars: Ralph Backstrom, Chris Benchetler, Rory Bushfield
Documentary | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.3/10 X  

Jimi Hendrix's landmark concert in Monterey County Fairgrounds in California in which he plays signature songs like "Purp;e Haze," "Foxy Lady," and "Wild Thing."

Directors: Chris Hegedus, D.A. Pennebaker
Stars: Jimi Hendrix, Noel Redding, Mitch Mitchell
Gimme Shelter (1970)
Documentary | Music | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

A harrowing documentary of the Stones' 1969 tour, with much of the focus on the tragic concert at Altamont.

Directors: Albert Maysles, David Maysles, and 1 more credit »
Stars: Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Mick Taylor


Cast overview, first billed only:
Himself (The Who)
Himself (The Who)
Himself (The Who)
Himself (The Who)
Himself (as Tommy Smothers)
Jimmy O'Neill ...
Russell Harty ...
Himself (as Melvin Bragg)
Mary Ann Zabresky ...
Michael Leckebusch ...
Barry Fantoni ...
Bob Pridden ...
Himself (as Keith Richard)


Through concert performances and interviews, this film offers us an "inside look" at this famous rock group, "The Who". It captures their zany craziness and outrageous antics from the initial formation of the group to its major hit "Who Are You", and features the last performance of drummer keith Moon just prior to his death. Written by Concorde - New Horizons (with permission).

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Seeing is believing!


Documentary | Music


PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:





Release Date:

23 November 1979 (Denmark)  »

Also Known As:

The Who: The Kids Are Alright  »

Box Office


$2,000,000 (estimated)

Company Credits

Production Co:

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs


Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »

Did You Know?


Thelma Schoonmaker wasn't originally involved in the film, but happened to be working in the editing suite next door and ended up with a credit. See more »


Rick Danko of The Band is listed in the end credits as appearing in the film, even though his segment was deleted from the final print. See more »


John Entwistle: We became rich later than I expected. Now I'm too old to enjoy my money.
See more »

Crazy Credits

At the end of the opening "Smothers Brothers" clip where The Who demolish their equipment, Keith Moon's bass drum with the Who logo on it explodes, and the very same logo spirals forward to the middle of the screen. Then the words of the title of the film pop up from the bottom of the screen while Pete Townshend smashes Tommy Smothers' acoustic guitar. See more »


Featured in Vanilla Sky (2001) See more »


Won't Get Fooled Again
Written by Pete Townshend
Performed by The Who
Fabulous Music Ltd.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

This is where it all ends
7 October 2003 | by (Chicago, IL) – See all my reviews

This is THE must see rock film. I can't think of any others that compare. The Stones' `Gimme Shelter' is great for reasons quite different than the music contained therein (of which the live material isn't very good). `Monterey Pop,' which features the Who, is certainly my favorite concert film from the era because of the culture it captured on its frames, as well as the eclecticism. The Hendrix performance alone makes that event historic. But the `Monterey' film is very passive & observational. In one sense, that is why I adore it so much, in another, more intellectual sense, it is lacking a philosophy about the material it depicts. I suppose the philosophy is really to document & be intentionally unobtrusive (to the viewers & actual subjects), which in my opinion is really a type of non-philosophy. The Kids Are Alright, however, epitomizes a certain condensed, irreverent and bombastic type of rock and roll that Pete Townshend has always been the ideal spokesman for. This is perhaps the only rock and roll film that is solely about the raw power and visceral effects of this music. Its primary goal is to capture that essence and to show you - not tell you - that the Who were the greatest rock & roll band ever. Of course, this is an age old debate between Stones, Who & Beatles fans. What's the answer?? I don't know as I love them all, and I really don't care either. The ability of this film to make you forget about those other bands, however, is undeniable. Watch this film in the proper setting & you'll be convinced, at least for the moment, that the Who were the best.

`The Kids Are Alright' is not an entirely professional job. Scenes sometimes present themselves through hatchet editing & sloppy placement. It is non-chronological and choppy. Interviews range from nonsensical to pretentious. In the case of Keith Moon, we believe that he never took anything seriously and appears to be caught consistently interchanging the personalities of entirely different people. Roger Daltry has surprisingly very, very little to say. John Entwistle - not as surprisingly - has even less to say & remains in the shadows throughout. But what would otherwise be considered technical movie shortcomings are exactly what the Who excel in; the texture of this film is much like the Who's music itself and therefore highly appropriate. This is why we're only treated to flashes of seriousness before the façades are dropped and the kinetic circus begins anew. While bits & pieces of the Who dynamic can perhaps be articulated, the band's aura existed first & foremost in their music and physical energy (there is a great clip of Townshend patiently listening to the intricate analysis of his music by a German television rock critic. After the critic finishes his exhaustive treatise, Townshend mulls over his possible answer for a moment & finally responds, `yeah.'). The intellectualism, rebellion, trendiness, wildness and downright punk-ishness of the Who is all captured here in its full Moon Era glory.

I would definitely encourage younger music lovers & musicians to watch this, draw comparisons & ponder the direction rock and roll has taken. Is the Dave Matthews Band our generation's answer to the Who? If it is, please wake me when the funeral for rock has ended so we can start over again, thank you very much.

Until just recently, I didn't realize that the `Baba O'Reilly' and `Won't Get Fooled Again' performances were Moon's last with the band. The director actually had the Who perform these especially for this film as he was unable to find `definitive' versions of the songs in the Who film archive. They are indeed amazing.downright sizzling, actually. Quintessential Who.

12 of 13 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
it's spelled "all right" carny666
Keith Moon on Smothers Brothers show madcap_laughs15
Young Man Blues delcater
New DVD: The Who At Kilburn 1977 glenwoodave
Region 2 Special Edition DVD layla78
Blue, Red and Grey zingzangspillip
Discuss The Kids Are Alright (1979) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page