Apocalypse Now
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 126 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


15 Movie Sets You Didn’t Know Were Hell To Work On

3 August 2015 3:31 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

New Line Cinema

Everyone knows that Jaws, Blade Runner, Apocalypse Now, The Crow, 47 Ronin and absolutely anything directed by David O. Russell had punishing shoots, but what about those ones you might not be quite so familiar with?

From Best Picture-winning classics to low-budget horrors, contemporary sci-fi flicks and everything in-between, these movies were all assailed by huge production problems, be it creative arguments on set or acts of God, which tested the mettle and patience of just about anyone working on them.

Though many of these movies are best remembered for, well, just being great movies, dig a little deeper and there are some juicy tales of how everyone involved suffered for their art, and though for some the juice may not have been worth the squeeze.

 

15. Gladiator Fox

Why It Was Hell: Developing Gladiator’s script was an absolutely agonising process, going through countless drafts such that, a mere two weeks before shooting, »

- Jack Pooley

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Videodrome: how Cronenberg subverts the noir thriller genre

31 July 2015 3:12 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

David Cronenberg's Videodrome isn't just a classic sci-fi horror, but also a brilliant noir thriller. Ryan explains why...

Everything in Max Renn’s life is beginning to pulsate. First the Betamax videotape sent to him by one Bianca O’Blivion, which seems to breathe in his hand as he removes it from its beige packaging. Then Max’s television, squatting in the corner of his apartment, appears take on a life of its own: veins twitching, the screen bulging to the sound of a woman’s voice: “Come to me, Max. Come to me...”

David Cronenberg’s Videodrome, released in 1982, is loaded with violent and startling imagery like this. Like Apocalypse Now, its very narrative seems to disintegrate as its morally suspect protagonist Max Renn (James Woods) embarks on a journey into his own heart of darkness: a fascination with the origins of a video signal soon leads him to a world of corruption, »

- ryanlambie

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Review: 'Listen To Me Marlon' Provides Gripping, Unprecedented Insight Into The Acting Legend

28 July 2015 3:26 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

“I coulda been a contender! I coulda been somebody, instead of a bum, which is what I am, let's face it.” That classic scene from “On The Waterfront” was part and parcel behind Marlon Brando's release into the stratosphere of supercool. Beginning with his stage debut as Stanley Kowalski in “A Streetcar Named Desire” (which he, of course, reprised in the 1951 film adaptation), his film debut in “The Men,” and a string of larger-than-life roles culminating with his Oscar-winning turn as Terry Malloy in 'Waterfront,' Hollywood was Brando's oyster in the 1950s, and a man became a cultural symbol. Through these roles, and future titanic turns in “The Godfather,” “Apocalypse Now,” and “The Last Tango in Paris,” we know and remember Marlon Brando as one of the greatest screen actors of all time. But what of the man behind the actor? This question fuels Stevan Riley's documentary, »

- Nikola Grozdanovic

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Billy Bob Thornton: The Hollywood Flashback Interview

24 July 2015 5:11 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

I sat down with Oscar-winning screenwriter, actor, director and musician Billy Bob Thornton for Venice Magazine in October of 2001. He had a slate of very diverse projects he was promoting: his first solo music album, "Private Radio," as well as the films "Monster's Ball," "Bandits," and "The Man Who Wasn't There." My strongest memory is of Thornton's quiet intensity and an undercurrent of Southern affability, which came out once he decided you were okay. He seemed to feel that way about me after I shared with him my idolatry of legendary filmmaker Fred Zinnemann, something we shared. I also remember his unusual diet, when our lunch was served. Thornton got the biggest plate of sliced papaya I've seen to date, artfully presented. I got a seafood salad. He looked at my plate, smiled, and told me about the horrible shellfish allergy he'd been saddled with all his life, and how »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Watch: "The Art of the Opening Shot" Highlights 'Star Wars', 'The Dark Knight', 'Lawrence of Arabia' and More

23 July 2015 2:59 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

"You never get a second chance to make a first impression," or so the saying goes, and sometimes with a film all it takes is one scene or perhaps even a single shot to draw viewers into a film. An opening shot often sets the tone for the rest of the story, something one YouTuber examines in the video below. More of a tribute video than a true video essay, the extended montage explores the art of the opening shot using clips from esteemed classics 2001: A Space Odyssey, Apocalypse Now, Lawrence of Arabia and Star Wars as well as more modern fare, too, including clips from The Dark Knight, No Country for Old Men and Stoker. Go ahead, check out the video below and see if you can spot which clips are from which films, and then take to the comments and let us know which films impress you »

- Jordan Benesh

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Watch: 5-Minute Supercut Presents Memorable Opening Shots

23 July 2015 11:29 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

It cannot be overstated just how important the opening shot is to a movie. The opening shot sets the tone for what to expect for the rest of the film’s running time. If you listen to a lot of director interviews, you’ll often hear how they have difficulty matching the movie they’ve made to what they originally planned inside their head. One would assume that the opening shot, at least, must be the one image that comes close towards approximating their vision. And it’s up to the rest of the film to live up to that initial image. Casper Christensen has put together a video montage of opening shots from a select number of movies that happen to create strong first impressions. There are so many great movies that have unforgettable opening shots and many of them are featured here. “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “Taxi Driver, »

- Ken Guidry

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BBC Culture curates 100 best American films, courtesy of 62 international film critics

22 July 2015 5:01 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

BBC Culture has this week unveiled a new list of the top 100 American films, as voted for by a pool of international film critics from across the globe. The format of the poll was that any film that would make the list had to have recieved funding from a Us source, and the directors of the films did not need to be from the USA, nor did the films voted for need to be filmed in the Us.

Critics were asked to submit their top 10 lists, which would try to find the top 100 American films that while “not necessarily the most important, but the greatest on an emotional level”. The list, as you may have guessed, is very different to the lists curated by say the BFI or AFI over the years, so there are certainly a few surprises on here, with Steve McQueen’s 12 Years A Slave (2013), Terrence Malick »

- Scott J. Davis

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Scratching our heads at the BBC's top 100 American Movies of All-Time

21 July 2015 5:07 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

First off, let's make one thing clear.  We're not scratching our heads at Spike Lee's "Do The Right Thing" making the BBC's 100 greatest American films.  That movie, of which an image accompanies this post, not only made the list, but ranked appropriately at no. 25.  It's the rest of the selections that have us scratching and, yes, shaking our heads in disbelief. A wonderful page view driver, these sorts of lists make great fodder for passionate movie fans no matter what their age or part of the world they hail from.  There is nothing more entertaining than watching two critics from opposite ends of the globe try to debate whether "The Dark Knight" should have been nominated for best picture or make a list like this.  Even in this age of short form content where Vines, Shapchats and Instagram videos have captured viewers attention, movies will continue to inspire because »

- Gregory Ellwood

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'Citizen Kane' Tops BBC's List of "100 Greatest American Films", Where Does Your Favorite Landc

21 July 2015 11:46 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Leave it to the Brits to compile a list of the best American films of all-time. BBC Culture has published a list of what it calls "The 100 Greatest American Films", as selected by 62 international film critics in order to "get a global perspective on American film." As BBC Culture notes, the critics polled represent a combination of broadcasters, book authors and reviewers at various newspapers and magazines across the world. As for what makes an American filmc "Any movie that received funding from a U.S. source," BBC Culture's publication states, which is to say the terminology was quite loose, but the list contains a majority of the staples you'd expect to see. Citizen Kane -- what elsec -- comes in at #1, and in typical fashion The Godfather follows at #2. Vertigo, which in 2012 topped Sight & Sound's list of the greatest films of all-time, comes in at #3 on BBC Culture's list. »

- Jordan Benesh

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BBC Names 100 Greatest U.S. Films

21 July 2015 9:56 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Every now and then a major publication or news organisation comes up with a top fifty or one hundred films of all time list - a list which always stirs up debate, discussion and often interesting arguments about the justifications of the list's inclusions, ordering and notable exclusions.

Today it's the turn of BBC Culture who consulted sixty-two international film critics including print reviews, bloggers, broadcasters and film academics to come up with what they consider the one-hundred greatest American films of all time. To qualify, the film had to be made by a U.S. studio or mostly funded by American money.

Usually when a list of this type is done it is by institutes or publications within the United States asking American critics their favourites. This time it's non-American critics born outside the culture what they think are the best representations of that culture. Specifically they were asked »

- Garth Franklin

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Locarno 2015. Lineup

20 July 2015 5:43 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Hong Sang-soo's Right Now, Wrong Then.The lineup for the 2015 festival has been revealed, including new films by Hong Sang-soo, Andrzej Zulawski, Chantal Akerman, Athina Rachel Tsangari, and others, alongside retrospectives and tributes dedicated to Sam Peckinpah, Michael Cimino, Bulle Ogier, and much more.Piazza GRANDERicki and the Flash (Jonathan Demme, USA)La belle saison (Catherine Corsini, France)Le dernier passage (Pascal Magontier, France)Der staat gegen Fritz Bauer (Lars Kraume, Germany)Southpaw (Antoine Fuqua, USA)Trainwreck (Judd Apatow, USA)Jack (Elisabeth Scharang, Austria)Floride (Philippe Le Guay, France)The Deer Hunter (Michael Cimino, UK/USA)Erlkönig (Georges Schwizgebel, Switzerland)Guibord s'en va-t-en guerre (Philippe Falardeau, Canada)Bombay Velvet (Anurag Kashyap, India)Pastorale cilentana (Mario Martone, Italy)La vanite (Lionel Baier, Switzerland/France)The Laundryman (Lee Chung, Taiwan)Me and Earl and the Dying Girl (Alfonso Gomez-Rejon, USA) I pugni ni tasca (Marco Bellocchio, Italy)Heliopolis (Sérgio Machado, Brazil)Amnesia (Barbet Schroeder, »

- Notebook

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Apocalypse Now Now: District 9 Writer Teri Tatchell Will Adapt Novel

18 July 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

Good news out of South Africa yesterday. Variety reported that South African author Charlie Human's urban fantasy novel Apocalypse Now Now will adapted to film by District 9 and Chappie writer Teri Tatchell. "South Africa has always pushed through the usual limits of my imagination and 'Apocalypse Now Now' is no exception," Tatchell said. "Charlie has actually upped the game and obliterated them all altogether."The novel centers on the kingpin of a smut-peddling high school who's dating the girl of his dreams. After she's kidnapped, he and a supernatural bounty hunter are plunged into the increasingly bizarre landscape of Cape Town's underworld to save her while facing a brush with the Apocalypse.Apocalypse Now Now will be a South-African Canadian co-production. And what is the Canadian connection? Why...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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District 9 screenwriter to adapt Apocalypse Now Now

17 July 2015 2:31 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Variety is reporting that the acclaimed urban-fantasy novel Apocalypse Now Now is in development over at La-based Xyz Films.

Oscar nominee Terri Tatchell (District 9) has been set to pen the script for the film, which will see Canada-based production company Redlab Digital collaborate with Xyz Films on the production.

The novel, written by Charlie Human, tells the story of “the kingpin of a smut-peddling high school who’s dating the girl of his dreams. After she’s kidnapped, he and a supernatural bounty hunter are plunged into the increasingly bizarre landscape of Cape Town’s underworld to save her while facing a brush with the Apocalypse.”

“South Africa has always pushed through the usual limits of my imagination and ‘Apocalypse Now Now’ is no exception,” states Tatchell. “Charlie has actually upped the game and obliterated them all altogether.”

»

- Scott J. Davis

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‘Apocalypse Now Now’ Movie Adaptation in the Works (Exclusive)

17 July 2015 7:21 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Charlie Human’s urban fantasy novel “Apocalypse Now Now” is being developed as a Canadian-South African production, Variety has learned exclusively.

Terri Tatchell, who received an Oscar nomination for the “District 9″ script, has been tapped to adapt “Apocalypse Now Now.” Her credits include “Chappie.”

Canadian production house Redlab Digital, in collaboration with Los Angeles-based Xyz Films, has acquired all film rights to the novel. The movie will be produced by Nicholas Sorbara for Redlab Digital, Sean Drummond and Michael Matthews for South Africa-based Be Phat Motel, with Todd Brown from Xyz Films as executive producer. Xyz Films is handling global sales.

The novel centers on the kingpin of a smut-peddling high school who’s dating the girl of his dreams. After she’s kidnapped, he and a supernatural bounty hunter are plunged into the increasingly bizarre landscape of Cape Town’s underworld to save her while facing a brush with the Apocalypse. »

- Dave McNary

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First Teaser Trailer For Alejandro G. Iñárritu's The Revenant

17 July 2015 6:04 AM, PDT | EmpireOnline | See recent EmpireOnline news »

Newly Oscar-garlanded, Alejandro G. Iñárritu might have taken the easy option with his next feature. An intimate drama set around a Manhattan coffee shop or a Mauritius-set comedy caper, perhaps. He has not done either of those things. Proof? Here's the first teaser trailer for 19th century-set survival tale The Revenant, in which the Mexican filmmaker has raised the levels of technical difficulty from 'Birdman' to something we can't even quantify without using the word "hoooooboy". Click below to see what we mean.That blistering intro offers the perfect entre into the brutal, bleak world Iñárritu has created, and two minutes that should have you hungering for a lot more. There's an impressionistic, almost Apocalypse Now-like aura to the visuals and sound design, and the kinetic, first-person camerawork bears the distinctive stamp of cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki. Here the collaborators behind the camera worked only with available light, restricting shooting »

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Joshua Reviews Eiichi Yamamoto’s The Belladonna Of Sadness [Theatrical Review]

17 July 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

It’s been a banner year for the repertory cinema racket.

Be it the various arthouses that are continuing to grow their catalogue of classic films that they screen any given week (a local museum near your’s truly will be screening Hausu with a live score, even), or the top museums around this country expanding their film screenings to full on festivals, fans of classic and rarely seen cinema are finding it easier and easier to enjoy these legendary films with a live audience. However, it’s still rare to find that one film that is not only a bonafide classic film, but also one that has been nearly impossible to see here stateside. We’ve already seen Les Blank’s long awaited Leon Russell documentary A Poem Is A Naked Person hit theaters for the first time, so the film world couldn’t already be seeing a second »

- Joshua Brunsting

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Script News: Edge, Fixer, Outcasts, Now

17 July 2015 4:55 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

The Edge of Normal

Bold Films has picked up Matt Venne's film script adaptation of Carla Norton's 2013 novel "The Edge of Normal". Michel Litvak, Matthew Rhodes, Andrew Deane and Lisa Zambri will produce.

The story follows a woman who escaped captivity from a sadistic sexual predator when she was a teenager. Ten years later, she remains haunted by her memories as she struggles to pull her life together and is drawn into a deadly cat-and-mouse game with a clever psychopath who seems to know her every move. [Source: Variety]

The Fixer

Fubar Films has optioned "House Of Cards" writer Bill Kennedy's thriller script "The Fixer" at Rumble Entertainment. Filming aims to begin later this year.

Set in the gritty intersection of the Los Angeles nightlife and organized crime, the plot follows a mob fixer who retires to repair his broken personal life but is soon drawn into the criminal underworld »

- Garth Franklin

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Why Emmy Nominee (and Movie-Lover) Anthony Bourdain's 'Parts Unknown' Is So Good

16 July 2015 2:37 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

If I could turn into another person it would be Anthony Bourdain. Why? He's got the life I envy. The television essayist travels the world to exotic locations for CNN Doc series "Parts Unknown," which is now into Season Five. Using local foodies as guides to each new country, Bourdain eats yummy mouth-watering cuisine as he grills the locals on their culture and often drinks to excess, while his team of four--two producers and two cameramen--shoot reportage, on the street in Shanghai, Madagascar and Myanmar, inside restaurants and kitchens in India, Thailand and Spain, on rural farms in Colombia and Paraguay, under water off the coast of Sicily, in S & M parlors in Tokyo. They are often inspired by movies they've seen, from "Apocalypse Now" to "In the Mood for Love." It's not all fun and games. Fans of the show will remember the infamous Sicily episode, when Bourdain was »

- Anne Thompson

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Why Emmy Nominee (and Movie-Lover) Anthony Bourdain's 'Parts Unknown' Is So Good

16 July 2015 2:37 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

If I could turn into another person it would be Anthony Bourdain. Why? He's got the life I envy. The television essayist travels the world to exotic locations for CNN Doc series "Parts Unknown," which is now into Season Five. Using local foodies as guides to each new country, Bourdain eats yummy mouth-watering cuisine as he grills the locals on their culture and often drinks to excess, while his team of four--two producers and two cameramen--shoot reportage, on the street in Shanghai, Madagascar and Myanmar, inside restaurants and kitchens in India, Thailand and Spain, on rural farms in Colombia and Paraguay, under water off the coast of Sicily, in S & M parlors in Tokyo. They are often inspired by movies they've seen, from "Apocalypse Now" to "In the Mood for Love." It's not all fun and games. Fans of the show will remember the infamous Sicily episode, when Bourdain was »

- Anne Thompson

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Watch: Oscar-Winning Editor and Sound Designer Walter Murch on the Shift from Film to Digital

13 July 2015 10:56 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Exclusive: Keanu Reeves on Why Film Should Stick Around in the Digital Age "Side by Side," Keanu Reeves' 2012 documentary, chronicled the steady move away from film to digital through interviews with experts in the field. Now, three years later, Reeves has released extended interviews that didn't make it into the original film. Directed by Christopher Kenneally of the original documentary and produced by Reeves, "Side by Side Extra" Volumes 1-5 has been released by Reeves as a DVD compilation. The five volumes are a fascinating exploration of the transition from film to digital, and the transition's effects on the industry and production, from a variety of nuanced perspectives.  In Volume 3, film editor and sound designer Walter Murch ("The Godfather," "Apocalypse Now") gives his perspective on the way we are moving from analog to digital. In a clip from his interview, Murch compares our old nature of »

- Meredith Mattlin

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 126 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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