Apocalypse Now
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 59 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


‘Hook’ Prequel About Rufio Imagined as ‘Moonlight’ Meets ‘Jurassic Park’

17 February 2017 12:26 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Ruffffiiooooo!

Earlier this week, “Hook” actor Dante Basco (best known for his turn as fan favorite Lost Boy Rufio in the 1991 new classic from director Steven Spielberg), launched a Kickstarter campaign in hopes of funding a short fan film about his character’s pre-“Hook” life, entitled “Bangarang.” The campaign is currently asking for $30,000 to fund the story of the orphaned “Roofus,” long before he added a kicky mohawk and headed off to Neverland. Added bonus? If the campaign hits its stretch goal of $200,000, Basco (who is serving as an executive producer on the project), along with writer and director Jonah Feingold, executive producer Rawn Erickson III and the rest of the “Bangarang” team, would set to work on a full feature.

IndieWire spoke with Basco, Feingold and Erickson just as the campaign was really taking off (as of this writing, the campaign has made over $23,000, and seems well on »

- Kate Erbland

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Peter Bart: Will Diversity Infusion Trip Up Highfalutin Frontrunners?

16 February 2017 10:43 AM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Filling out my Academy ballot this week, I find myself indulging in an exercise in Oscar futility: re-living my list of Oscar "should-haves." Brokeback Mountain should have won over Crash in 2005, Apocalypse Now over Kramer vs. Kramer in 1979 and Et over Gandhi in 1982. The Academy is, well, the Academy, but some 683 new members have been added to the rolls this year representing a wider swath of experience and taste. Will future lists of nominees and winners reflect this… »

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‘Legion’: Noah Hawley’s ‘Romance of the Mind’ Might Be Hiding a Heart of Darkness

15 February 2017 8:07 PM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Legion” Season 1, “Chapter 2.”]

Apocalypse Now

Maybe the wild premiere left me Fubar, but the opening of “Legion’s” second episode gave off major “Apocalypse Now” vibes. David’s ominous, deadened voiceover recalled Martin Sheen’s war-torn work in Francis Ford Coppola’s classic. The song — “Road to Nowhere” by the Talking Heads — served as a modern stand-in for The Doors’ “The End,” which would be far too on-the-nose (and overused) to be repurposed yet again, but the notes guided a slow, seemingly peaceful riverboat ride; an iconic wartime image, countlessly repurposed in many an action film, but never so effectively alluding to the horrors hidden on each riverbed as in the Oscar-winning 1979 film.

Read More: ‘Legion’ Premiere: The 9 Moments That Make It a Masterpiece

And there are horrors lurking in “Legion” — literal and figurative. As sunlight shone through the trees above, men in “black masks, boots, and the one they called, ‘The Eye, »

- Ben Travers

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‘Legion’: Noah Hawley’s ‘Romance of the Mind’ Might Be Hiding a Heart of Darkness

15 February 2017 8:07 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Legion” Season 1, “Chapter 2.”]

Apocalypse Now

Maybe the wild premiere left me Fubar, but the opening of “Legion’s” second episode gave off major “Apocalypse Now” vibes. David’s ominous, deadened voiceover recalled Martin Sheen’s war-torn work in Francis Ford Coppola’s classic. The song — “Road to Nowhere” by the Talking Heads — served as a modern stand-in for The Doors’ “The End,” which would be far too on-the-nose (and overused) to be repurposed yet again, but the notes guided a slow, seemingly peaceful riverboat ride; an iconic wartime image, countlessly repurposed in many an action film, but never so effectively alluding to the horrors hidden on each riverbed as in the Oscar-winning 1979 film.

Read More: ‘Legion’ Premiere: The 9 Moments That Make It a Masterpiece

And there are horrors lurking in “Legion” — literal and figurative. As sunlight shone through the trees above, men in “black masks, boots, and the one they called, ‘The Eye, »

- Ben Travers

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Return to Montauk review – beached affair takes time to connect

15 February 2017 9:38 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Past lovers Nina Hoss and Stellan Skarsgård border on the unlovable in this slow-paced drama, but Volker Schlöndorff’s film rewards patience for its final twist

Volker Schlöndorff’s scalding film of The Tin Drum shared the Palme d’Or with Apocalypse Now in 1979. The director turns 78 next month and is no longer at the peak of his powers. But Return to Montauk proves that he still has it in him to startle and wrongfoot an audience.

What appears to be a clunky, tasteful, middle-aged rehash of Before Sunset, with two former lovers reunited after one of them writes a novel about their affair, turns out at the eleventh hour to have a sting in its tail. Schlöndorff and the novelist Cólm Toibín wrote the screenplay, which is adapted in part from the memoir Montauk by the late Swiss playwright and novelist Max Frisch, to whom the picture is dedicated. »

- Ryan Gilbey

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Apocalypse Now Game Abandons Kickstarter Campaign, Shifts To In-House Crowdfunding

15 February 2017 7:04 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

See Full Gallery Here

Barring a last-minute influx of funding, the Kickstarter campaign for Erebus’ buzzworthy Apocalypse Now – The Game is set to fall far short of its $900,000 target. Only nine days remain on the clock, and after amassing only $172,000 of that end-goal, developer Erebus has now drafted up a contingency plan.

Though the Kickstarter campaign will remain active, the studio has shifted to an in-house crowdfunding model that’s set up shop at Apocalypsenow.com. Unlike Kickstarter, this new campaign won’t be tied down to a finite end date, and ultimately ensures that Apocalypse Now – The Game isn’t scrapped altogether. Described as “Fallout: New Vegas on acid in Vietnam,” the video game adaptation got the blessing of the illustrious Francis Ford Coppola when it was first announced back in January, and Game Director Montogomery Markland told Polygon earlier this week that this revised model will cultivate a »

- Michael Briers

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Berlinale 2017: The Lost City of Z Review

14 February 2017 12:48 PM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Guest

Adapted from David Grann’s 2009 book of the same name, The Lost City of Z  sees the welcome return of director James Gray (The Immigrant) in a highly ambitious project. The film is a semi-biographical account in the life of legendary British explorer Percy Fawcett and follows his adventures in the uncharted Amazonian territories. Gray – a director well versed in the glory days of British cinema – pays homage to the films he loves as he takes his audience on an unrelenting journey in search of what Fawcett called the “City of Z”,  an ancient settlement deep in the heart of the Amazon.

Set in the early part of the 20th century and within the realm of a soon to be defunct British empire, the film stars Charlie Hunnam (Sons of Anarchy, Pacific Rim) as Major Percy Fawcett, a lowly army officer belittled by his superiors and in need »

- Guest

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Erase and Forget: new documentary reveals life story of the real Rambo

13 February 2017 7:50 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Vietnam veteran ‘Bo’ Gritz went on covert operations in Panama, recovered POWs in Burma and even ran for president. Andrea Luka Zimmerman spent 10 years creating a cinematic portrait of the war hero turned whistleblower

John Rambo, the character famously played by Sylvester Stallone, was said to have been inspired by tales of this decorated Vietnam veteran’s feats behind enemy lines. Cigar-chomping Colonel “Hannibal” Smith was loosely based on his adventures with a real-life A-team. And for Apocalypse Now, Francis Ford Coppola wanted to superimpose Marlon Brando’s head on to a photograph showing this legendary soldier surrounded by a bunch of Cambodian mercenaries.

Like his filmic alter egos, James Gordon “Bo” Gritz was frequently confronted with violence and destruction during a lengthy military career. By his own claims, he killed more than 400 people in operations ranging from the Bay of Pigs to Afghanistan.

Continue reading »

- Philip Oltermann

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Kong: Skull Island Gets an Awesome Retro-Style Japanese Poster

9 February 2017 1:13 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Just days after a new Kong: Skull Island IMAX poster debuted, which paid homage to Francis Ford Coppola's enduring classic Apocalypse Now, three new one-sheets have surfaced. The first is another IMAX poster, which isn't exactly a 1970s throwback like the earlier poster, but it does feature the massive Kong preparing to fight a number of helicopters descending on his home, Skull Island. The second poster features Brie Larson touching the massive ape's face while Tom Hiddleston looks on. The third poster is an insane Japanese Kaiju-inspired poster, which director Jordan Vogt-Roberts shared on Twitter, with the following message.

"Can we talk about how great our Japanese Kaiju poster is?"

The one-sheet was officially unveiled in Japan this week, and director Jordan Vogt-Roberts is clearly a fan of this artistic poster that features some of the "Skullcrawlers" we've seen in the earlier trailers. We first heard about these »

- MovieWeb

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Every Action Star That Needs to Be in Expendables 4

9 February 2017 7:19 AM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Sylvester Stallone is the master at making the most out of simplicity. So good is this action legend at taking a basic idea and making it exist forever, that eventually he tries to give said idea a certain degree of gravitas. How does he do this you say?

Take Rocky Balboa. In the first film, this lovable schlub just wants to have a girlfriend and go the distance in a dream title fight. By the fourth film in this wondrous saga, Rocky is defending America on Russian soil and beating a fighter who (realistically) would have Ko'd the Italian Stallion in 1 round. In fact, Rocky was almost Ko'd in one round, however, the referee let it go on. How's that for Sylvester Stallone making the most of something simple?

He did the same thing with Rambo. In the first film, John Rambo was a simple man who just wanted to »

- MovieWeb

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Trailer released for Schwarzenegger’s ‘Aftermath’

8 February 2017 5:01 AM, PST | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Here’s a question: is this the new wave of films we’re expecting? Have we lost all sense of creativity that now we have to look towards terrible events as a means to create a film with emotional appeal? Be it Patriots Day or Bastille Day from last year alone, to countless other films released in the past decade– it’s a manipulation of the emotions that warrants questioning. Granted, this is completely different from historical films like All The President’s Men or Zodiac, but then the question is, is it any different than films from World War II or Vietnam, like Pearl Harbor or Apocalypse Now

Anyhow. .. .

Arnold Schwarzenegger is definitely pulling it in with that emotional appeal. He lost his wife all the while is busy attempting to fight a white guy in power who lost his old job.

No this isn’t the real world. »

- Catherina Gioino

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The Japanese poster for Kong: Skull Island hits all the right notes

7 February 2017 10:00 AM, PST | JoBlo.com | See recent JoBlo news »

Last week, Warner Bros. dropped the IMAX poster for Kong: Skull Island which paid some serious homage to Apocalypse Now. This week, we have a brand new, Japanese poster that brings to life the classic kaiju aspects of the film. With all due respect to the actors involved, this one-sheet showcases the Real stars of the movie! Take a look! Personally, this poster is my favorite so far.... Read More »

- Sean Wist

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The ‘Kong: Skull Island’ Japanese Poster is Amazing

7 February 2017 10:00 AM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

I hope someone has bought the marketing team working on Kong: Skull Island a nice fruit basket or a bottle of champagne because their work has been so weird and so wonderful. Those trailers are nothing short of nutty and the most recent poster deliberately riffed on Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now, with King Kong […]

The post The ‘Kong: Skull Island’ Japanese Poster is Amazing appeared first on /Film. »

- Jacob Hall

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Japanese Poster For Kong: Skull Island Delivers An Old-School Take On The Great Ape

7 February 2017 7:30 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

One month out from the film’s release, the fiery Japanese poster for Kong: Skull Island is here, and it’s teeming with monsters big and small.

Front and center is Kong himself, the mighty, primordial ape that’s considered King of the island. Seen here grappling one of the many Apache helicopters cutting through the sky – cue the many nods to Francis Ford Coppola’s seminal Apocalypse Now – the raging behemoth towers over a trio of Skull Crawlers. That’s the term coined by John C. Reilly’s wide-eyed character Marlow, a castaway who washed up on Skull Island many moons ago, and therefore has a deep understanding of both the island and its extraordinary food chain.

Perhaps most interesting of all is that on the one-sheet below, you’ll also be able to locate a series of monstrous tentacles protruding from the forest. They don’t seem to »

- Michael Briers

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Here’s an incredible Japanese poster for Kong Skull Island

7 February 2017 5:41 AM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Jon Lyus

This may well be the best movie poster released this year. It’s certainly a far cry from the witless artistic meanderings thrown about by many of the big studios for their blockbusters. Kong Skull Island is building on some very solid foundations however, and the new Japanese IMAX poster is a wonderful throwback to the decades of over the top poster art. With just a few weeks to go until the mighty beast is unleashed now is a good time to catch up with what we’ve seen so far.

Related: The Biggest Monster Movies

Our initial trip to Skull Island was via a curiously tentative first trailer, which was superseded by a gloriously monster-focused Japanese version.  Then we had a very impressive IMAX poster inspired by the famous Apocalypse Now marketing, complementing an already fine selection of posters for Jordan Vogt-Roberts’ film. This new poster »

- Jon Lyus

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The Skull Crawlers Are Unleashed On This Incredible Japanese Kaiju Poster For Kong: Skull Island

7 February 2017 4:20 AM, PST | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

On the heels of the recent Apocalypse Now-inspired poster, director Jordan Vogt-Roberts took to Twitter early this morning to debut this stunning "Japanese Kaiju" one-sheet for Kong: Skull island, which places the focus on the various vicious creatures the King will have to contend with when the film hits theaters next month. The image calls to mind the classic Godzilla posters from back in the day, and should help to get fans hyped for the inevitabel showdown between these two iconic movie monsters. Check it out below, and let us know what you think in the usual place. A team of explorers and soldiers travel to an uncharted island in the Pacific, unaware that they are crossing into the domain of monsters, including the mythic Kong. Starring Brie Larson, Tom Hiddleston, Samuel L. Jackson, John Goodman, Jing Tian, Corey Hawkins, Jason Mitchell, John Ortiz, Shea Whigham, and Toby Kebbell, »

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Kong: Skull Island Japanese poster is packed with monsters

7 February 2017 12:11 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

We’ve seen some rather great posters for Kong: Skull Island during the film’s marketing campaign (such as this Apocalypse Now homage) and now we have what may be the best yet thanks to the one-sheet for the Japanese release, which sees King Kong joined by an array of monsters; take a look here, via Reddit…

See Also: Kong: Skull Island producer reveals Godzilla vs. Kong connections

When a scientific expedition to an uncharted island awakens titanic forces of nature, a mission of discovery becomes an explosive war between monster and man. Tom Hiddleston, Samuel L. Jackson, Brie Larson, John Goodman and John C. Reilly star in a thrilling and original new adventure that reveals the untold story of how Kong became King.

Kong: Skull Island is set for release on March 10th, 2017 with Jordan Vogt-Roberts directing a cast that includes Tom Hiddleston (High-Rise), Brie Larson (Room), John Goodman »

- Gary Collinson

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Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

6 February 2017 1:47 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by »

- Jordan Raup

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From ‘Manchester By the Sea’ to the Super Bowl: How a Rising Cinematographer Landed a Major Budweiser Ad

6 February 2017 12:53 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

If the Budweiser Super Bowl ad “Born The Hard Way” reminded you of the work of Paul Thomas Anderson, that’s not a coincidence. The 60-second commercial that tells the story of Anheuser-Busch co-founder Adolphus Busch’s emigration from Germany to St. Louis, Missouri was inspired by Anderson’s “The Master” and “There Will Be Blood,” according to director of photography Jody Lee Lipes.

Read More: ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’ Super Bowl Trailer: Chris Pratt and the Alien Misfits Face Their Biggest Battle Yet

The cinematographer of “Manchester by the Sea” and “Trainwreck,” Lipes and the commercial’s director, Chris Sargent, also drew inspiration from Francis Ford Coppola’s “Apocalypse Now,” Terrence Malick’s “Days of Heaven” and “The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford.” Sargent hired Lipes for the Budweiser ad after the pair worked together on commercials for Asics and Acura.

Set in »

- Graham Winfrey

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Scott Reviews Alexandre Moors’ The Yellow Birds [Sundance 2017]

3 February 2017 4:08 PM, PST | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

In my review of his new film A Ghost Story, I mentioned that David Lowery’s greatest weakness prior to making it was in tying his creativity to slight variations on other people’s movies. Alexandre MoorsThe Yellow Birds, which Lowery cowrote with R.F.I. Porto, suggests he has not completely worked past that stage of his artistic development. A jumbled mix of stock war-film influences (The Deer Hunter, Apocalypse Now, and Platoon remain potent inspirations for men of a certain age), The Yellow Birds features some fine acting and character work inside a plot that tries five different paths without committing to any of them. This could be a potent way to explore the unpredictability of war, but instead feels like a callous attempt to maintain an audience’s interest in what is already plenty interesting – the corrosive effect of violence, no matter who perpetrates it.

Bartle (Alden Ehrenreich »

- Scott Nye

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 59 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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