Apocalypse Now
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 64 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Time Machine: Veterans Wallach and Coppola - Godfather 3 in Common - Are Special Oscar Honorees

24 April 2015 12:28 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson on the Oscars' Red Carpet Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson at the Academy Awards Eli Wallach and wife Anne Jackson are seen above arriving at the 2011 Academy Awards ceremony, held on Sunday, Feb. 27, at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The 95-year-old Wallach had received an Honorary Oscar at the Governors Awards in November 2010. See also: "Doris Day Inexplicably Snubbed by Academy," "Maureen O'Hara Honorary Oscar," "Honorary Oscars: Mary Pickford, Greta Garbo Among Rare Women Recipients," and "Hayao Miyazaki Getting Honorary Oscar." Delayed film debut The Actors Studio-trained Eli Wallach was to have made his film debut in Fred Zinnemann's Academy Award-winning 1953 blockbuster From Here to Eternity. Ultimately, however, Frank Sinatra – then a has-been following a string of box office duds – was cast for a pittance, getting beaten to a pulp by a pre-stardom Ernest Borgnine. For his bloodied efforts, Sinatra went on »

- D. Zhea

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10 unsung heroes behind Star Wars: A New Hope

22 April 2015 11:08 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

The Star Wars franchise is going strong 38 years later. But what about the artists and filmmakers who helped make the 1977 original a hit?

In theatres all over the world in 1977, audiences thrilled at the sights and sounds of Star Wars. Harking back to a bygone age of Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers, it also pointed forward to the coming age of ubiquitous computers and special effects-led blockbusters.

But while the triumphant fanfare of John Williams' score gave Star Wars a confident swagger, its success was far from preordained. George Lucas reworked his script time and again; studios turned his concept down; even the production was rushed and torturous.

By now, the contribution George Lucas, John Williams and Star Wars' cast made to cinema is well documented. But what about some of the other artists, technicians and fellow filmmakers who helped to make the movie such a success? Here's »

- ryanlambie

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20 movie villains and the menacing stories they tell

15 April 2015 5:33 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

"How do you get rats off an island?" From Skyfall's Silva to Harry Lime, we took at the menacing little stories told by 20 screen villains.

Occasionally, a movie villain will pause for a moment to deliver a brief story or anecdote. And often, these apparently incidental tales tell us a lot about an antagonist's state of mind, experiences or warped worldview.

We've compiled a selection of 20 here. Some of them are blackly funny. Many are disturbing. One or two are even moving. The first one's very strange. All of them bring something unique to each particular film in which they appear, and all of them are laced with a delicious hint of menace.

20. Xander - Enemies Closer (2013)

"When I was a little boy at my grandmama's place, she had a lovely goose. I named her Edith, after the French singer Edith Piaf..."

We begin with a delightfully weird story from Peter Hyams' 2013 thriller, »

- ryanlambie

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Alex Garland Doesn't Like the Third Act of 'Apocalypse Now' and 6 More Highlights from His Reddit Ama

14 April 2015 9:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Why 'Ex Machina' Writer-Director Alex Garland Doesn't Consider Himself a First-Time Filmmaker To promote his directorial debut, "Ex Machina," Alex Garland did a Reddit Ama yesterday offering advice to writers and revealing some of his inspirations. He also offered a few insights into the screenwriting process, including the fact that the most common, detrimental mistake he sees screenwriters make is overwriting. He noted that for him, adaptations are easier because someone has already done much of the heavy lifting, and that he was not the right guy to adapt "Halo" for Peter Jackson, a project he worked on in 2005. Garland also mentioned that the classic novel he'd most like to adapt would be "Heart of Darkness." Hm, perhaps because, as he says in the Ama, he has a few issues with "Apocalypse Now?" Check out that and the other highlights below. Don't be afraid to not like the end of his movies, »

- Casey Cipriani

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The Tin Drum director Volker Schlöndorff pays tribute to Günter Grass by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2015-04-13 19:14:25

13 April 2015 11:14 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Günter Grass with David Bennent and Volker Schlöndorff on the set of The Tin Drum

Günter Grass, honored in 1999 with the Nobel Prize for Literature, died at the age of 87 today, April 13. Volker Schlöndorff directed The Tin Drum (Die Blechtrommel), based on Grass’s first novel and worked on the screenplay with Jean-Claude Carrière and Franz Seitz. Grass contributed additional dialogue. The film premiered at Cannes in 1979, winning the Palme d'Or in a tie with Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now and the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1980. Last year in New York at Lincoln Center, Volker and I discussed his adaptations, from The Tin Drum to Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman and Cyril Gély's play Diplomatie (Diplomacy).

Peeling the onion signed by Günter Grass - June 2007 Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

When Günter Grass came to New York in June 2007, I had the chance to discuss »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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The Noteworthy: 8 April 2015

10 April 2015 10:30 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

 Above: the 2015 Crossroads Film Festival kicks off on Friday, April 10th, and features Paul Clipson's Hypnosis Display with a live soundtrack by Grouper. Check out the rest of the amazing lineup here. Like everyone, we're devastated that David Lynch will not be directing the Twin Peaks revival season after all. Above: the latest issue of La Furia Umana is online now and includes an intriguing survey of "What's (Not) Cinema Becoming?"From the new issue of The Brooklyn Rail: pieces on Tsai Ming-liang's Rebels of the Neon God, J.P. Sniadecki's The Iron Ministry, and an interview with Xin Zhou.For Cinema Scope, Jordan Cronk writes on this year's True/False Film Festival. There are two incredible websites for you to browse from La Cinématheque Francaise: one on Pier Paolo Pasolini, and one on Michelangelo Antonioni. For his blog Following Film, Christoph Huber writes on "The Siodmak Variations": »

- Notebook

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The Best of “Movie Poster of the Day,” Part 10

10 April 2015 7:51 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Above: 1936 alternative one sheet for Modern Times (Charlie Chaplin, USA, 1936), designer unknown, and Us one sheet for The Shining (Stanley Kubrick, USA, 1980), designer: Saul Bass (1920-1996).As serendipity would have it, the two most popular posters of the past three months of Movie Poster of the Day were these two black and yellow faces, one a little-known 1930s poster by a journeyman designer at a budget print house, the other a very well known 1980s poster by the most recognizable name in movie poster design. Modern Times and Modern Horror. I’m hoping the love they received (over 500 likes and reblogs for each) were just as much about the items they were promoting: one my article on Leader Press, the other the Poster Boys podcast on Saul Bass by fellow movie poster aficionados (and ace designers) Sam Smith and Brandon Schaefer. Another Poster Boys related poster—Drew Struzan’s The Thing—also made the list. »

- Adrian Curry

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The contender, part 1 by Anne-Katrin Titze

7 April 2015 6:10 AM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Marlon Brando

What do Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather and Apocalypse Now, Bernardo Bertolucci's Last Tango In Paris, Elia Kazan's A Streetcar Named Desire, On the Waterfront, and Viva Zapata!, Daniel Mann's The Teahouse Of The August Moon, Edward Dmytryk's The Young Lions, Gillo Pontecorvo's Burn!, Lewis Milestone's Mutiny On The Bounty, Guys And Dolls directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz and One-Eyed Jacks have in common? Brando the movie star in Stevan Riley's documentary, Listen To Me Marlon, becomes Marlon, the man.

After a conversation with Parabellum director Lukas Valenta Rinner at New Directors/New Films, I met up with Stevan at Lincoln Center.

"Brando was himself fascinated by these same topics of truth and lies, of myth and fantasy and reality."

Hundreds of hours of Brando's audio recordings had gone unheard until Riley took his pick and put together this fascinating portrait. »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Why a Spike Lee Protégé Shot Drug Trafficking Drama 'Manos Sucias' in Colombia

6 April 2015 12:45 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Filmmaker and Nyu professor Spike Lee loves discovering new talent behind the camera. One of his protégés is Josef Kubota Wladyka, a first-time Japanese/Polish director who studied under Lee and debuted this Us/Colombian co-production in Cartagena and then Tribeca in Spring 2014. This gritty, well-reviewed drug smuggling drama opened this month from The Film Collaborative and is getting attention for what Wladyka calls its "Apocalypse Now"-stye shoot in the treacherous environs of Buenaventura with nonprofessional actors. The Colombian port city is among several key cities in the country that has begun to attract movie-making talent. Read More: Why Hollywood Is Discovering Colombia, from Medellín and Bogotá to Cartagena Wladyka talks to The Dissolve about shooting in Colombia: "It wouldn’t have worked anywhere else, because they speak such a specific way in Buenaventura. It looks such a specific way, with its gray skies and »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Watch: Antonio Banderas Is a Trapped Chilean Miner in Claustrophobic 'The 33' Trailer

31 March 2015 10:19 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

It was inevitable that the 2010 Chilean mining incident would hit the big screen. The tragedy of 33 miners trapped half a mile underground after a 121-year-old copper-gold mine caved in is reenacted by Antonio Banderas, Lou Diamond Phillips, Rodrigo Santoro and Juliette Binoche as one of the entombed miner's sisters. A first international trailer has arrived via 20th Century Fox Chile. The film is entirely in English, with Chilean accents, which should secure its international appeal (while annoying others). Written by Mikko Alanne and José Rivera, "The 33" is produced by "Apocalypse Now" producer Mike Medavoy, who worked closely with the families to tell this story. After 69 days, and several attempts, all 33 miners were rescued. "The 33" opens in Chile on April 6 and in the Us sometime in 2015 »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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10 Things Everyone Gets Wrong About The Vietnam War

31 March 2015 12:57 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

The Vietnam War is one of the most-controversial military conflicts in American history and has inspired countless books, televisions series and, most-famously, cinema as a result.

Films such as Forrest Gump, Apocalypse Now, Full Metal Jacket, The Deer Hunter and We Were Soldiers – as well as the Rambo movies – have portrayed the warfare experienced during the Vietnam War, the fierce resistance and anti-war protests back on Us soil, as well as the traumatic effects many soldiers suffered from the sickening conflict.

Yet, just like all popular culture, these films have been inspired by the general myths and perceptions that exist about the Vietnam War – created by the media and via other ways in which the war has been portrayed.

But it is dangerous to just take the stereotypes that have been linked to the Vietnam War as gospel – because in many cases they simply do not bear up to close scrutiny. »

- Chris Waugh

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Video Games That Should Be Movies

30 March 2015 3:29 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Annoyed by the poor quality of existing video game movies, we decided to take the matter into our own hands and come up with our own ideas. This is a list of what we came up with.

Earlier this month, we showed you that there are a lot of video game-based movies on their way to theaters. This surely will become a trend that will continue for the next few years. There are countless properties available to use as inspiration, and therefore, it's only a matter of time before someone figures out how to make a great video game movie. Until that time comes, we have to wait patiently. In order to occupy our minds, we asked our contributors to pick a video game that they think would make a great movie and then to create a pitch for that movie. The below list is what we came up with. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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Memorable Highlights From The 2015 TCM Film Festival

29 March 2015 9:04 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

For the sixth consecutive year, thousands of movie lovers from around the globe descended upon Hollywood for the TCM Classic Film Festival. The 2015 festival took take place Thursday, March 26 – Sunday, March 29, 2015 and no matter your favorite genre, attendees were treated to an extensive lineup of great movies, appearances by legendary stars and filmmakers, fascinating presentations and panel discussions, special events and more.

Friday night’s screening of Apollo 13 was definitely one of the most exciting events of the festival. Celebrating its 20th anniversary, Ron Howard’s impressive telling of the nearly doomed mission of the 3 astronauts aboard Apollo 13 looked as spectacular as the first time audiences saw it 20 years ago.

Host and long-time Nasa enthusiast Alex Trebek was on hand to introduce the film, as well as introduce fans in attendance to the real Captain Jim Lovell (played in the film by Tom Hanks). Also joining them on »

- Melissa Thompson

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Watch: Explore Master Cinematographer Vittorio Storaro's Bold Use Of Color In This Supercut

27 March 2015 2:15 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Even if you can’t immediately place his name, you’ve undoubtedly seen his work. “Apocalpyse Now,” “The Last Emperor,” “Last Tango in Paris,” "Ladyhawke,” “Reds,” and “Dick Tracy” to name but a few. Vittorio Storaro is a master cinematographer who has contributed his immense talent to over five dozen film and television projects during his epic (and ongoing) 50-plus year career. His work has garnered him three Oscars for Best Cinematography (for “The Last Emperor,” “Reds,” and “Apocalypse Now”), as well as a fourth nomination (“Dick Tracy”). One of the defining elements of Storaro’s work is his use of color. As a 3-minute supercut from Vimeo user movement_of_time professes, Storaro is “the man who uses color shades as a poet uses words. In every [one of] his film[s] the choice of a specific color is rigidly connected with the 'ideology' of history, and the color does not simply duplicate the scene information, »

- Zach Hollwedel

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New Directors/New Films Review: Gripping 'Listen To Me Marlon' Reveals The Man Behind The Myth Of Marlon Brando

27 March 2015 1:48 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

“I coulda been a contender! I coulda been somebody, instead of a bum, which is what I am, let's face it.” That classic scene from “On The Waterfront” was part and parcel behind Marlon Brando's release into the stratosphere of supercool. Beginning with his stage debut as Stanley Kowalski in “A Streetcar Named Desire” (which he, of course, reprised in the 1951 film adaptation), his film debut in “The Men,” and a string of larger-than-life roles culminating with his Oscar-winning turn as Terry Malloy in 'Waterfront,' Hollywood was Brando's oyster in the 1950s, and a man became a cultural symbol. Through these roles, and future titanic turns in “The Godfather,” “Apocalypse Now,” and “The Last Tango in Paris,” we know and remember Marlon Brando as one of the greatest screen actors of all time. But, what of the man behind the actor? This question fuels Stevan Riley's documentary, »

- Nikola Grozdanovic

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National Geographic's 'Killing Jesus': Tales from the Morocco set

26 March 2015 9:30 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Ouarzazate, Morocco. Officially, the Moroccan city of Ouarzazate is nicknamed "The door of the desert," resting south of the High Atlas Mountains and on the edge of the Draa Valley. Thanks to the presence of Atlas Studios, though, Ouarzazate is perhaps more appropriately known as The Hollywood of Central Morocco, or perhaps even The Hollywood of Morocco. Ouarzazate has a population of just over 50,000, but in late October of 2014, that population includes a disproportionate number of Jesuses, Judases and an absurd number of Marys, both Jesus' mom and of the Magdalene variety.  It's late October of 2014 and Ouarzazate is the beating heart of TV's Biblical world. "It's a very holy town right now," laughs Haaz Sleiman, one of the Ouarzazate Jesi -- Yes, that should be the name of a fantasy baseball team -- specifically playing the title role in National Geographic's "Killing Jesus," the project that has brought me to this region. »

- Daniel Fienberg

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My First R-Rated Movie

24 March 2015 1:30 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

My First R-rated Movie Or…

How I Became The 007 Of Covert Forbidden Film Viewing

By Alex Simon

For those of us who grew up in the suburbs in the pre-home video, pre-cable TV and pre-Netflix coupons 1970s and early ‘80s, there were few dangerous pleasures as heady as sneaking into an R-rated movie at the local multiplex. The multiplex cinema was a ‘70s phenomenon that made regulating children’s viewing habits infinitely more difficult than the old days of stand-alone, single screen theaters. Ironically, the new freedom that filmmakers enjoyed with the advent of the MPAA rating system in late 1968 was almost in perfect synch with the rise of multi-screen cinemas. Some things do happen for a reason.

You never forget your first...

My first R-rated film was during Thanksgiving of 1976. We were visiting my dad’s family in Birmingham, Alabama and the men adjourned after dinner to go see Two Minute Warning, »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Fox Searchlight Moves Up ‘Me and Earl and the Dying Girl’ Release

10 March 2015 1:02 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Sundance favorite “Me and Earl and the Dying Girl” will open in limited release on June 12, a date that will see it square off against another festival favorite, “Dope.”

Both pictures sparked fierce bidding when they debuted at the Park City gathering this year, but “Dope,” which centers on a group of inner-city youths, will be in more theaters as it premieres in wide release. Fox Searchlight beat out the likes of the Weinstein Co., CBS Films and Focus Features for rights to “Me and Earl.”

“Me and Earl” will also debut on the same day as “Jurassic World.” Fox Searchlight had previously slated the film to bow on July 1, the same day as “Terminator: Genisys” and “Magic Mike Xxl.”

“Me and Earl” centers on a high school student (Thomas Mann) who befriends a girl in his class with cancer (Olivia Cooke). Despite its heavy subject matter, the film is »

- Brent Lang

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Kickstarter project for Dennis Hopper’s last film

10 March 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Despite having passed away five years ago, it looks like Dennis Hopper is set to feature in his final role – if a Kickstarter campaign can earn all of its money.

Here’s the press release:

March 10th, 2015 – New York – Today the production team behind Dennis Hopper’s unreleased final film, The Last Film Festival, are launching a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds to complete the picture. Dennis Hopper is known for his dramatic roles, but offers a rare comedic tour de force performance in The Last Film Festival. The money raised on Kickstarter will allow director Linda Yellen to bring this film by the Hollywood star of Easy Rider and other legendary films to the public and to his fans.

Check out the Kickstarter page here.

Filming on The Last Film Festival came to a halt four years ago when Dennis Hopper tragically died at the age of 74 from cancer. »

- Luke Owen

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A Lion Almost Eats a Man's Head in New Look at 'Roar' Coming from Drafthouse

7 March 2015 12:56 PM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Drafthouse Films recently partnered with Olive Films to offer audiences a re-release director Noel Marshall 1981 film Raor with plans for an upcoming limited theatrical release across the Us this spring followed by a Blu-ray, DVD and On Demand platforms release later this summer. What is Roarc I didn't know before the press release last month, but here's Drafthouse's Tim League's lengthy and fascinating description: Roar began while Tippi Hedren star of Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds and her husband/manager Noel Marshall were shooting in Africa. After wrapping production they toured several safari wildlife preserves and were struck by the scene of an abandoned plantation house overrun by a large pride of lions. The image took root and inspired the epic eleven-year journey to create Roar. Hedren and Marshall quickly became devoted to raising awareness about the overhunting of wild lions, tigers and jaguars, as well as the inhumane treatment of big cats in captivity. »

- Brad Brevet

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 64 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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