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Oscars flashback: Meryl Streep exclaims ‘Holy mackerel’ winning her 1st Oscar for ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’ [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Meryl Streep exclaims ‘Holy mackerel’ winning her 1st Oscar for ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’ [Watch]
Believe it or not, long before a record-shattering 21 Oscar nominations, there was a time when Meryl Streep was not the queen of the movies. After finishing at Yale Drama School in the 1970s, Streep found steady work on stage and television before her breakout role in 1978’s Best Picture Oscar winner, “The Deer Hunter.” That film brought Streep her first Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress (and first loss) for her performance as Linda, the fiancee of a troubled Vietnam vet (Christopher Walken in an Oscar-winning performance).

The following year she starred in three major films: as the love interest of Alan Alda in “The Seduction of Joe Tynan;” as Woody Allen’s lesbian ex-wife in “Manhattan;” and as the troubled Joanna Kramer opposite Dustin Hoffman in “Kramer vs Kramer.” It was that latter role that brought her a first-ever win at the Academy Awards. The first words exclaimed by Streep were “Holy mackerel!
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’: A look back at her first Oscar win and the competition

Meryl Streep in ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’: A look back at her first Oscar win and the competition
This article marks Part 2 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

In 1978, Meryl Streep, already renowned for her work on the New York stage, grabbed the attention of moviegoers across the country with her Oscar-nominated turn in the Best Picture champ “The Deer Hunter.” That year, however, would seem minor in comparison to what was on the horizon in 1979.

Streep was about to work with three of the decade’s hottest directors – Woody Allen, at his most in-demand after “Annie Hall” (1977) and “Interiors” (1978); Robert Benton, whose “The Late Show” (1977) was a big hit; and Jerry Schatzberg, who won critical acclaim with “The Panic in Needle Park” (1971) and “Scarecrow” (1973).

The resulting trio of Allen’s “Manhattan,” Benton’s “Kramer vs.
See full article at Gold Derby »

John Conboy Dead at 83

John Conboy, an executive producer known for his work on soap operas The Young and the Restless, Santa Barbara, Guiding Light and Capitol, died Friday in Palm Desert, California. He was 83.

Conboy won four Daytime Emmy Awards for his work on the soap operas: his first for The ABC Afternoon Playbreak, two for The Young and the Restless and one for Santa Barbara.

After beginning his television career as an actor, he made the switch to producing in 1970 on Love is a Many Splendored Thing. He then moved to The Young and the Restless in 1973, winning Emmys in 1975 and 1983 for outstanding daytime drama. In 1982, he left the show to executive produce Capitol, which ran for five years.

Conboy went on to executive produce Santa Barbara, winning his fourth Emmy in 1990 for daytime drama. He returned to CBS to produce Guiding Light.

He also worked on a number of TV movies,
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Ben Vereen Apologizes for ‘Inappropriate Conduct’ After Being Accused of Sexual Assault

  • Indiewire
Ben Vereen Apologizes for ‘Inappropriate Conduct’ After Being Accused of Sexual Assault
Ben Vereen has issued an apology for “inappropriate conduct” while directing a theatrical production of “Hair” in 2015. Two women, Kaitlyn Terpstra and Kim (who chose not to reveal her last name), told the New York Daily News that they were lured into Vereen’s hot tub while he was naked and that he forced one of them to perform oral sex on him.

Read More:Bill Maher Mocks Al Franken Groping Photo, Pretends to Harass Bob Saget

“I would like to apologize directly to the female cast members of the musical ‘Hair’ for my inappropriate conduct when I directed the production in 2015,” the 71-year-old Tony winner said in a statement. “While it was my intention to create an environment that replicated the themes of that musical during the rehearsal process, I have since come to understand that it is my conduct, not my intentions, which are relevant here. So I
See full article at Indiewire »

Bww TV: Broadway Belts Out Kander & Ebb in Rehearsal for And The World Goes 'Round Gala!

Abingdon Theatre Company has a star-studded gala in the works featuring a musical revue with some of Broadway's best and brightest. And the World Goes 'Round is a stunning musical revue by John Kander and Fred Ebb, the multi Tony Award winning team that wrote Chicago and Cabaret. From Flora the Red Menace to Kiss of the Spider Woman and everything in between, the nonstop hit-parade features unforgettable gems including 'All that Jazz,' 'Maybe This Time,' 'Colored Lights' and 'New York, New York,' seamlessly woven into an unforgettable evening of musical theatre. And the World Goes 'Round is a celebration of life, love and the fighting spirit that keeps us all going.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

The Furniture Index

Can we have a random break for applause for Daniel Walber's The Furniture column. It was Daniel's birthday this weekend so he has the day off. He's already 69 episodes in to this incredible series which has been filled with sharp insights, a keen eye, and rich Hollywood anecdotes. Here's everything he's covered thus far. Please show your love in the comments if you look forward to these each Monday.

The Forties and Fifties

Hold Back the Dawn (1941) Bored at the border

How Green Was My Valley (1941) Designing dignity

That Hamilton Woman (1941) High ceilings

• Captain of the Clouds (1942) A Canadian air show

• The Magnificent Andersons (1942) Victorian Palace / Manifest Destiny

My Gal Sal (1942) Nonsense Gay Nineties

The Shanghai Gesture (1942) Appropriating Chinese design

Black Narcissus (1947) Mad for matte paintings

David and Bathsheba (1951) A humble palace of moral struggle

A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) Decorative madness

My Cousin Rachel (1952) Ghosts of property

Lust for Life
See full article at FilmExperience »

Movie Poster of the Week: New York in the 1970s in Polish Posters

Above: Polish poster for Escape from New York (John Carpenter, USA, 1981). Designer: Wieslaw Walkuski.For three weeks in July, New York’s Film Forum is running a stellar series of more than 40 1970s New York-set films. As soon as I heard about the program I wanted to do a poster article on it, given that the 1970s was a heyday for American poster design. However, when I started to look at the posters I realized that many of them were so well known that rehashing their posters wasn’t that interesting. But in my search I started to notice how many of the films had Polish counterparts. It is interesting that so many of these American productions were released in Poland and it may have had a lot to do with the counter-cultural, anti-establishment bent of most of the films.While poster design in the U.S. had moved quite decisively from illustration to photography-based in the late 60s, Polish poster art was still mostly drawn and painted in the 1970s. There are a couple of exceptions here but the photos are collaged or posterized in a way that is quite different from the way they would be used in the U.S. Another interesting note is that very few of the posters make use of New York signifiers, with the obvious exception of the Statue of Liberty for Escape from New York, and a silhouetted skyline for Manhattan (notably the two films with the most New York-specific titles). Otherwise the posters seen here are typically idiosyncratic, eccentric, beautiful, alluring, occasionally baffling and, with the possible exception of Serpico, always strikingly unlike their American counterparts. This selection also feels like a tour of great Polish poster art in the 70s, with most of the major artists represented: Jakub Erol, Wiktor Gorka, Eryk Lipinski, Andrzej Klimowski, Jan Mlodozeniec, Andrzej Pagowski, Waldemar Swierzy, Wieslaw Walkuski and more. It seems as if every major designer got a crack at at least one of these challenging, thrilling films.Above: Polish poster for Manhattan (Woody Allen, USA, 1979). Designer: Andrzej Pagowski.Above: Polish poster for Marathon Man (John Schlesinger, USA, 1976). Designer: Wiktor Gorka.Above: Polish poster for All That Jazz (Bob Fosse, USA, 1979). Designer: Leszek Drzewinski.Above: Polish poster for Three Days of the Condor (Sydney Pollack, USA, 1975). Designer: J. Czerniawski.Above: Polish poster for The Hospital (Arthur Hiller, USA, 1971). Designer: Marcin Mroszczak.Above: Polish poster for Diary of a Mad Housewife (Frank Perry, USA, 1970). Designer: Eryk Lipinski.Above: Polish poster for Taxi Driver (Martin Scorsese, USA, 1976). Designer: Andrzej Klimowski.Above: Polish poster for Klute (Alan J. Pakula, USA, 1971). Designer: Jan Mlodozeniec.Above: Polish poster for Saturday Night Fever (John Badham, USA, 1977). Designer: Andrzej Pagowski.Above: Polish poster for The French Connection (William Friedkin, USA, 1971). Designer: Andrzej Krajewski.Above: Polish poster for Serpico (Sidney Lumet, USA, 1973). Designer: Jakub Erol.Above: Polish poster for The Panic in Needle Park (Jerry Schatzberg, USA, 1971). Designer: Tomas Ruminski.Above: Polish poster for Midnight Cowboy (John Schlesinger, USA, 1969). Designer: Waldemar Swierzy.Above: Polish poster for The Anderson Tapes (Sidney Lumet, USA, 1971). Designer: Jan Mlodozeniec.See New York in the 70s at Film Forum from July 5 to 27.Posters courtesy of Heritage Auctions.
See full article at MUBI »

Bruce MacCallum, Camera Operator, Dies at 70

Bruce MacCallum, Camera Operator, Dies at 70
Bruce MacCallum, a camera operator on films including “Silence of the Lambs” and a longtime union activist, died Monday in Los Angeles. He was 70.

MacCallum started out in entertainment as an assistant to Dustin Hoffman, then moved into the camera department and worked on films including “Raging Bull,” “Married to the Mob,””All that Jazz,” “Witness,” and “Heartburn” as assistant cameraman.

He went on to become camera operator on “School of Rock,” “The Departed,” “I Am Legend” and “The Adjustment Bureau.”

More recently he worked on TV shows including “The Night Of” and “The Blacklist” as well as the recent feature “The Book of Henry.”

MacCullum helped train and mentor many fellow members of the International Cinematographers Guild (Icg, Iatse Local 600), where he served as National Assistant Secretary-Treasurer between 2007 and 2016.

He is survived by Linda, his wife of 32 years.

Related storiesJodie Foster Writes Heartfelt Tribute to Jonathan DemmeJodie Foster Pays Tribute to Jonathan Demme,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Bruce MacCallum Dies: Veteran Camera Operator And Union Activist Was 70

Bruce MacCallum Dies: Veteran Camera Operator And Union Activist Was 70
Bruce MacCallum, a veteran camera operator and longtime union activist, died in Los Angeles on June 12. Most recently he was working in TV on HBO’s The Night Of and NBC’s The Blacklist. He was 70. Among the feature films MacCallum worked on during his long career were All That Jazz (1979), Witness (1985), The Silence Of The Lambs (1991), I Am Legend (2007) and The Adjustment Bureau (2011). MacCallum started his entertainment industry career in 1973 as a personal assistant…
See full article at Deadline »

Bruce MacCallum Dies: Veteran Camera Operator And Union Activist Was 70

Bruce MacCallum, a veteran camera operator and longtime union activist, died in Los Angeles on June 12. Most recently he was working in TV on HBO’s The Night Of and NBC’s The Blacklist. He was 70. Among the feature films MacCallum worked on during his long career were All That Jazz (1979), Witness (1985), The Silence Of The Lambs (1991), I Am Legend (2007) and The Adjustment Bureau (2011). MacCallum started his entertainment industry career in 1973 as a personal assistant…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Bruce MacCallum, Veteran Camera Operator, Dies at 70

Bruce MacCallum, a veteran camera operator and longtime union activist, died Monday in Los Angeles, the International Cinematographers Guild announced. He was 70.

MacCallum served as a camera assistant and operator for more than 40 years, with credits including All That Jazz (1979), Witness (1985), Heartburn (1986), The Silence of the Lambs (1991), I Am Legend (2007), Julie & Julia (2009), The Adjustment Bureau (2011), Winter's Tale (2014) and Broadway's Hamilton.

He was the recipient of the Camera Operator Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013 and was nominated for the 2017 Camera Operator of the Year Award in Television for his work (along with Ben Semanoff) on HBO's The Night Of. He...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Bruce MacCallum, Veteran Camera Operator, Dies at 70

Bruce MacCallum, Veteran Camera Operator, Dies at 70
Bruce MacCallum, a veteran camera operator and longtime union activist, died Monday in Los Angeles, the International Cinematographers Guild announced. He was 70.

MacCallum served as a camera assistant and operator for more than 40 years, with credits including All That Jazz (1979), Witness (1985), Heartburn (1986), The Silence of the Lambs (1991), I Am Legend (2007), Julie & Julia (2009), The Adjustment Bureau (2011), Winter's Tale (2014) and Broadway's Hamilton.

He was the recipient of the Camera Operator Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013 and was nominated for the 2017 Camera Operator of the Year Award in Television for his work (along with Ben Semanoff) on HBO's The Night Of. He...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

The Furniture: All That Jazz and the Creative Erotics of Scaffolding

"The Furniture" is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail. Here's Daniel Walber ...

All That Jazz (1979) is the only Palme d’Or winner to have won the Oscar for Best Production Design. I do not have an explanation for that. Luck of the draw, really. But, as we await the prizes at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, this odd piece of trivia is an excellent excuse to take a closer look at Bob Fosse’s masterpiece.

There are actually a few odd things about the film’s Oscar record. It’s not only a rare Oscar-winning remake, but a remake of another production design nominee: Federico Fellini’s 8½. The four designers who took home the prize for All That Jazz include not only production designer Philip Rosenberg and art directors Gary Brink and Edward Stewart but also Tony Walton,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Ismael’s Ghosts’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Ismael’s Ghosts’
By far the most important ingredient for any artist is life experience: When storytellers try to tackle anything more realistic than a by-the-numbers superhero movie, it helps to have had your heart broken, perhaps to have lost a parent, to have been forced to choose between two lovers, to have fathered a child. With “Ismael’s Ghosts,” Arnaud Desplechin attempts to cram all this and more into a single film. A self-absorbed, nightmare-besotted director (played by Mathieu Amalric) is literally haunted by his past when his wife, presumed dead for 21 years, unexpectedly reappears midway through his latest production — but even though much seems to be informed by autobiography (or at least narcissism), precious little rings true.

As phony emotional showcases go, this one’s full of unintentionally comedic melodrama, rivaling cult favorite “The Room” at times as Amalric (reprising his role as the chronicallly unstable Ismael Vuillard from “Kings and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Guest Post: How a Short I Wrote Ended Up Being Directed by Robin Wright and Premiering at Cannes

The Dark of Night

Guest Post by Denise Meyers

I am the antithesis of what a successful screenwriter looks like: I am 57, female, and live in the fly-over zone.

I am also a great one for beating the odds, because on May 18, 2017, the short film I wrote, “The Dark of Night,” directed by Robin Wright and starring Leslie Bibb and Sam Rockwell, will make its debut at the Cannes Film Festival, opening for the Cannes Classics film block and the digitally remastered version of 1980 Palme d’Or winner “All That Jazz.”

So how in the hell did a dame from North Carolina get an A-list actress like Robin Wright to direct a 10-minute film without an agent or a manager, but with an outstanding cast and 80 crew members from “House of Cards?”

That’s a good question.

I started my career in the film industry in 1982 as an assistant to Jody Scott-Fox, a motion picture literary agent. After 12 years I managed to work my way to the middle as an assistant to a producer, then became a story analyst for several independent film companies.

With the dream of a career in film always just out of reach, I finally gave up, packed my bags and moved to Utah where I became the top-selling gourd artist in the nation. Odd transition, I know, but where I failed miserably in the film industry, I killed in the art business. My work sold for between $500 and $25,000, and I was in top galleries and magazines and on TV.

Then the economy crashed and so did my business. That’s when “the dream that wouldn’t die” reared its head again and I started writing with a vengeance.

“Ride the Wind,” a script I wrote about Jamaican-American motorcycle legend Bessie Stringfield, was selected as an Athena List winner in 2016, and “Lucky 13,” my script about the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots, was an Athena Finalist. The Athena List was founded by Melissa Silverstein and Kathryn Kolbert as the answer to The Black List — the predominately male online script service — to give writers like myself the same chance men have to get their work in front of the people who can help get it made.

Scriptd founder Denise Hewett, a force of nature in her own right, gave “Lucky 13” to Beau Gordon, who used to work for Kevin Spacey. Beau passed it along to Nini Le Huynh, Robin Wright’s assistant, and an amazing actress in her own right.

I sent Nini “The Dark of Night,” a short script I’d written that won Table Read My Screenplay Austin in 2015, as a project for Nini to star in. Not long after, she called to ask if I would mind having a small crew from “House of Cards” produce the film. Sure, I thought. And pinch me while you are at it.

Then it got better. A lot better. Robin Wright read the script and wanted to direct it.

Before we knew it, 80 crew members signed onto the project: Dave Dunlap, the Director of Photography, Jessica Wenger McPhail, the costume designer, Alphonso Carrion, the editor, Todd Halvern, the assistant Ad, Sharif Salama, the Upm, Cassandra McCarthy, Kara Tabor, Eric Goserud, and dozens of others.

We shot last December in Baltimore on the same set Barry Levinson used for the classic film “Diner.” The production design department did an outstanding job of turning an iconic restaurant into a 1930s film noir dream, and we shot the film in black and white. John Garfield and Lana Turner should have had it so good.

Nothing in life prepares you to walk the red carpet at the Cannes Film Festival, just like nothing prepares you to have Robin Wright direct a film you wrote as an exercise in getting out of your own head.

I still live in fly-over zone, and I don’t have an agent, but it’s okay. Because for the rest of my life, I will know I defied the odds and accomplished the impossible.

Not too bad for a 57-year-old screenwriter from North Carolina, wouldn’t you say?

In February 2017 Denise Meyers was named the winner of the Atlanta Film Festival Screenplay competition. In February 2016 she was an Athena List winner at the Athena Film Festival in New York. She is the only writer in the six-year history of the Athena Film to have two screenplays make it to the finals, “Ride the Wind: The Bessie Stringfield Story,” and “Lucky 13.” “Lucky 13” was a Nashville Film Festival finalist and placed in the top 15 percent of scripts submitted to the Nicholl fellowships. Meyers is a finalist for the Seriesfest Female Initiative for a limited series TV pilot about the all-girl bands of WWII. She recently completed “Truth Against the World,” a pilot based on the “The Dark of Night.”

Guest Post: How a Short I Wrote Ended Up Being Directed by Robin Wright and Premiering at Cannes was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Cannes adds restored 'Bugsy Malone', 'Saturday Night Fever'

  • ScreenDaily
Cannes adds restored 'Bugsy Malone', 'Saturday Night Fever'
Exclusive: Cannes Classics additions also include Michael Bay’s Bad Boys.

Cannes Classics is understood to have added three movies to its lineup in the shape of Bugsy Malone, Saturday Night Fever and Bad Boys.

Director Alan Parker has been closely involved in the restoration of his 1976 classic Bugsy Malone, which is due to get a Cinéma de la Plage (beach screening) on Friday May 19th.

The director’s cut of John Travolta dance drama Saturday Night Fever, which will celebrate its 40th anniversary this year with a Us re-release, is slated for a Cinéma de la Plage on Saturday 20th May.

The cut will include three scenes not in the original release.

Michael Bay’s 1995 action-comedy Bad Boys will also get a beach screening on Monday 22 May. The film’s star Will Smith is on the festival jury this year.

The trio are among the Classics lineup restored by distributor Park Circus, which has also
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Play it again Cannes! by Richard Mowe - 2017-05-03 15:49:22

In focus: David Hemmings in Antonioni’s trip around swinging London, part of Cannes Classics Photo: Cannes Film Festival

The Cannes Film Festival organisers have put the accent on heritage cinema with a particular connection to the Festival itself in the 70th edition.

The selection of some 24 titles and five documentaries, mainly in brand new copies, covers the years from 1946 to 1992 and includes René Clément’s The Battle Of The Rails, shown at the very first event, where it won an international jury award and a best director award.

Danielle Darrieux who has celebrated her 100th birthday, as she appears in Max Ophüls’ Madame De… in 1953. Photo: Cannes Film Festival

Other landmark titles announced today (3 May) are The Wages Of Fear by Henri-Georges Clouzot (shown in 1953); 1967’s Palme d’Or winner Blow-Up, Michelangelo Antonioni’s take on swinging London with David Hemmings, and the highly controversial (at the time in
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Cannes Classics 2017 Lineup Includes ‘Belle de Jour’ Restoration, Stanley Kubrick Doc and More

Cannes Classics 2017 Lineup Includes ‘Belle de Jour’ Restoration, Stanley Kubrick Doc and More
The 2017 Cannes Film Festival has announced the lineup for Cannes Classics, a selection of vintage films and masterpieces from the history of cinema. This year’s program is dedicated primarily to the history of the festival, and includes one short film and five new documentaries.

Read More: Cannes Adds Roman Polanski Film to Lineup

Highlights from the lineup include “Belle du Jour” (1967), Luis Bunuel’s classic about a housewife who dabbles in prostitution, and “All That Jazz ” (1979) Bob Fosse’s story of a womanizing, drug-using dancer played by Roy Scheider. There is also the documentary “Filmworker,” which tells the story of Leon Vitali, an actor who abandoned his career after “Barry Lyndon” to become Stanley Kubrick’s right hand man and creative collaborator behind the scenes.

Rights holders to the films decide whether to screen them in 2K or 4K, or use an original print. Jean Vigo’s “L’Atalante,
See full article at Indiewire »

New Kubrick Documentary, New Restorations Of ‘The Wages Of Fear’ & ‘All That Jazz’ Lead 2017 Cannes Classics Line-Up

The classics strands at film festivals are frustrating things for critics. On the one hand, the chance to see shiny new restorations of some of the greatest movies ever made on the big screen in plush surroundings is as about as good a way to spend your time as we can imagine. On the other, if you’re there as press, it’s almost impossible to sneak off to one of those films without missing something you’re meant to be covering.

Continue reading New Kubrick Documentary, New Restorations Of ‘The Wages Of Fear’ & ‘All That Jazz’ Lead 2017 Cannes Classics Line-Up at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »
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