7.8/10
21,907
153 user 90 critic

All That Jazz (1979)

Director/choreographer Bob Fosse tells his own life story as he details the sordid life of Joe Gideon, a womanizing, drug-using dancer.

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Popularity
3,859 ( 872)

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Won 4 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 14 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Erzsebet Foldi ...
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Dr. Ballinger
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William LeMassena ...
Irene Kane ...
Leslie Perry (as Chris Chase)
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Kathryn Doby ...
Kathryn
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Robert Hitt ...
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Storyline

Choreographing and picking dancers for his current show whilst editing his feature film about a stand-up comedian is getting to Joe Gideon. Without the chemical substances, he would not have the energy to keep up with his girlfriend, his ex-wife, and his special dancing daughter. They attempt to bring him back from the brink, but it's too late for his exhausted body and stress-ravaged heart. He chain-smokes, uses drugs, sleeps with his dancers and overworks himself into open-heart surgery. Scenes from his past life start to encroach on the present and he becomes increasingly aware of his mortality. Written by Jeremy Perkins {J-26}

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

All that work. All that glitter. All that pain. All that love. All that crazy rhythm. All that jazz. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Music | Musical

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

20 December 1979 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Hinter dem Rampenlicht  »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$86,229, 23 December 1979, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$37,823,676
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

On the audio commentary it is revealed that Roy Scheider had many "unusual lessons" from Bob Fosse throughout filming which included coughing lessons since Joe Gideon was a chain smoker who coughed very heavily and Fosse instructed Roy how to do it properly; and during the heart-attack scene at the hospital Fosse described to Scheider how painful it was, as if someone was pressuring a weight to his chest - and to perform the scene, off camera the first assistant director pressed one knee on Scheider's chest while the camera was capturing his painful expressions. See more »

Goofs

Close-up of "Young Joe" with hazel eyes is shortly followed by a close-up of adult Joe with blue eyes. See more »

Quotes

[repeated line]
Joe Gideon: Don't bullshit a bullshitter.
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Crazy Credits

There are no opening credits, only the company credits and the title, which resembles revolving Broadway lights. See more »

Connections

Featured in The 82nd Annual Academy Awards (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Bye Bye Love
(1957) (uncredited)
Written by Boudleaux Bryant and Felice Bryant
Performed by Ben Vereen and Roy Scheider with modified lyrics ("Bye Bye Life")
See more »

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User Reviews

 
A dance with Death...
22 October 2005 | by See all my reviews

Bob Fosse's autobiographical look at the hectic life of a Broadway director/choreographer rehearsing a new show in New York City while concurrently editing his latest movie. Roy Scheider fabulously stands in for Fosse; as Joe Gideon, pill-popping, womanizing, self-destructive genius on the verge of collapse, it is Scheider's shining moment as an actor. Fosse paints himself as suspicious, paranoid, driven, indifferent, exhausted and horny. It's more than most of us want to know about the man, who seems intent on showing us what a creep he is...but a talented creep! The film doesn't particularly look good (it's a gray movie), though it has amazing musical flourishes and the self-styled bombast is actually rather amusing once you get the idea. Jessica Lange is beautiful in an early role as the Angel of Death (imagine Fosse explaining that role to her!), and Scheider's performance is really something to see (only occasionally does the camera catch him not knowing what to do). Fosse tries hard not to be pretentious, he keeps things playful and perky, and his ironic ending is bitterly funny. The film is alive and ticking--but that's not Fosse's heart, it's a time bomb. *** from ****


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