"Rumpole of the Bailey"
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2004

4 items from 2015


Herbert Wise, ‘I, Claudius’ Director, Dies at 90

14 August 2015 1:25 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

British Film and television director Herbert Wise, whose work included the seminal miniseries “I, Claudius,” died Aug. 5 in London. He was 90.

When it aired on BBC Two in 1976, the critically beloved “I, Claudius” created an uproar with its violence, nudity and sex. The series was a breakout role for star Derek Jacobi, who played the stuttering Claudius, whom no one thought could ever become emperor of Rome but did.

The Bafta and Emmy nominee contributed to more than five decades of television and film including “Rumpole of the Bailey,” telepic “Skokie” and 1989 feature horror-mystery “The Woman in Black.”

In a statement Friday, the Directors Guild of America said, “Herbie was an important figure in the golden age of British television whose wide influence and impressive list of miniseries and movies for television impacted directors and audiences around the world. … Herbie was a strong voice for directors in the U.K. »

- Mannie Holmes

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Herbert Wise, ‘I, Claudius’ Director, Dies at 90

14 August 2015 1:25 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

British Film and television director Herbert Wise, whose work included the seminal miniseries “I, Claudius,” died Aug. 5 in London. He was 90.

When it aired on BBC Two in 1976, the critically beloved “I, Claudius” created an uproar with its violence, nudity and sex. The series was a breakout role for star Derek Jacobi, who played the stuttering Claudius, whom no one thought could ever become emperor of Rome but did.

The Bafta and Emmy nominee contributed to more than five decades of television and film including “Rumpole of the Bailey,” telepic “Skokie” and 1989 feature horror-mystery “The Woman in Black.”

In a statement Friday, the Directors Guild of America said, “Herbie was an important figure in the golden age of British television whose wide influence and impressive list of miniseries and movies for television impacted directors and audiences around the world. … Herbie was a strong voice for directors in the U.K. »

- Mannie Holmes

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Herbert Wise obituary

12 August 2015 9:21 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Film and television director whose work included I, Claudius, Rumpole of the Bailey, Z Cars and The Woman in Black

The film and television director Herbert Wise, who has died aged 90, made an impressive contribution to television drama over five decades. Most notably, he earned plaudits (and Bafta and Emmy nominations) as the director of all 13 episodes of I, Claudius (1976), the Robert Graves adaptation starring Derek Jacobi; but his credits appeared on a wide range of programmes, including Z Cars, Upstairs Downstairs, The Norman Conquests, Rumpole of the Bailey, Breaking the Code, and both The Woman in White and The Woman in Black. In 1979 he won a Bafta for his outstanding service to television.

As Herbert Weisz, he arrived in Britain in January 1939 on the Kindertransport, a 14-year-old Jewish refugee from Vienna without a word of English. He was fostered by the family of a wealthy Surrey accountant, who almost »

- Philip Purser

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Arthur Daley, Del Boy and Rumpole – three characters straight out of Dickens

7 August 2015 8:17 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

George Cole’s death is a reminder of a trio of brilliant comic creations who could easily have graced the great writer’s novels

The death of the actor George Cole has rightly resulted in a rush of clips and memories of his stand-out TV role: the bumbling crook Arthur Daley in Minder. But, for me, thoughts of Cole’s frequently belittled Mr Big always blur with two other peak-time characters of the same era who also had a comically troubled relationship with the law: David Jason’s Del Boy Trotter in Only Fools and Horses and Leo McKern’s Horace Rumpole in Rumpole of the Bailey.

Apart from the fact that they competed for audiences and awards over a period of more than a decade, a Venn diagram representing these three vivid creations would have other shared areas. Arthur overlapped with Del Boy as con artists with a low »

- Mark Lawson

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2004

4 items from 2015


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