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Robert Vaughn, Suave 'Man From U.N.C.L.E.,' Is Dead at 83

Robert Vaughn, Suave 'Man From U.N.C.L.E.,' Is Dead at 83
New York -- Robert Vaughn, the debonair, Oscar-nominated actor whose many film roles were eclipsed by his hugely popular turn in television’s The Man From U.N.C.L.E., has died. He was 83.

Vaughn died Friday morning after a brief battle with acute leukemia, according to his manager, Matthew Sullivan.

The Man From U.N.C.L.E. was an immediate hit, particularly with young people, when it debuted on NBC 1964. It was part of an avalanche of secret agent shows (I Spy, Mission: Impossible, Secret Agent), spoofs (Get Smart), books (The Spy Who Came in From the Cold) and even songs (Secret Agent Man) inspired by the James Bond films.

Vaughn’s urbane superspy Napoleon Solo teamed with Scottish actor David McCallum’s Illya Kuryakin, a soft-spoken, Russian-born agent.

Photos: Stars We've Lost In Recent Years

The pair, who had put aside Cold War differences for a greater good, worked together each week for the mysterious U.N.C.L.E. (United
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Robert Vaughn, Star of 1960s Adventure Series The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Dies at 83

  • PEOPLE.com
Robert Vaughn, an Oscar-nominated actor who also starred in the 1960s TV series The Man from U.N.C.L.E., has died, People confirms. He was 83.

Vaughn passed away at 7:30 a.m. on Friday morning in a hospital on the East Coast after a brief battle with leukemia, his rep Matthew Sullivan tells People. Just shy of his 84th birthday, Vaughn received treatments for his cancer battle in both Manhattan and in a hospital near Ridgefield, Connecticut before passing away.

A New York native, the veteran actor received his first and only Oscar nomination in 1960 for his supporting role in The Young Philadelphians.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83
Robert Vaughn, who starred as Napoleon Solo on TV’s “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” from 1964-68, died Friday morning of acute leukemia, his manager Matthew Sullivan told Variety. He was 83.

Vaughn began undergoing treatment for the illness this year on the East Coast.

The James Bond-influenced “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.,” in which Vaughn’s Solo and David McCallum’s Illya Kuryakin battled the evil forces of T.H.R.U.S.H. around the globe (thanks to the glories of stock footage), was quite the pop-culture phenomenon in the mid-1960s, even as the show’s tone wavered from fairly serious to cartoonish and back again over its four seasons.

It spawned a spinoff, “The Girl From U.N.C.L.E.,” starring Stefanie Powers, as well as a few feature adaptations during the run of the TV series — “One Spy Too Many,” “One of Our Spies Is Missing,” and “The Karate Killers” — that starred Vaughn and McCallum.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83

Robert Vaughn, ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E.’ Star, Dies at 83
Robert Vaughn, who starred as Napoleon Solo on TV’s “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” from 1964-68, died Friday morning of acute leukemia, his manager Matthew Sullivan told Variety. He was 83.

Vaughn began undergoing treatment for the illness this year on the East Coast.

The James Bond-influenced “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.,” in which Vaughn’s Solo and David McCallum’s Illya Kuryakin battled the evil forces of T.H.R.U.S.H. around the globe (thanks to the glories of stock footage), was quite the pop-culture phenomenon in the mid-1960s, even as the show’s tone wavered from fairly serious to cartoonish and back again over its four seasons.

It spawned a spinoff, “The Girl From U.N.C.L.E.,” starring Stefanie Powers, as well as a few feature adaptations during the run of the TV series — “One Spy Too Many,” “One of Our Spies Is Missing,” and “The Karate Killers” — that starred Vaughn and McCallum. Vaughn
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Julie Harris obituary

Award-winning actor renowned for her work on Broadway and roles in classic films such as East of Eden and The Haunting

Unable to make sufficient money from her novels, the great American writer Carson McCullers took advice from Tennessee Williams and allowed one of her masterpieces to be adapted for the theatre. The resultant success of The Member of the Wedding (1950) widened her fame, and made a Broadway star of Julie Harris, who has died aged 87.

The play's main character is Frankie Addams, a gawky 12-year-old who longs for companionship and the "we of me". Although the second juvenile role, in what is essentially a three-hander, went to a child actor, Brandon de Wilde, the complex part of Frankie fell to Harris, who was then 24. Born in Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan, and trained at the Yale School of Drama, Harris had made her Broadway debut in It's a Gift in
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Julie Harris obituary

Award-winning actor renowned for her work on Broadway and roles in classic films such as East of Eden and The Haunting

Unable to make sufficient money from her novels, the great American writer Carson McCullers took advice from Tennessee Williams and allowed one of her masterpieces to be adapted for the theatre. The resultant success of The Member of the Wedding (1950) widened her fame, and made a Broadway star of Julie Harris, who has died aged 87.

The play's main character is Frankie Addams, a gawky 12-year-old who longs for companionship and the "we of me". Although the second juvenile role, in what is essentially a three-hander, went to a child actor, Brandon de Wilde, the complex part of Frankie fell to Harris, who was then 24. Born in Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan, and trained at the Yale School of Drama, Harris had made her Broadway debut in It's a Gift in
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Before 'The Butler' There Was ‘Backstairs At The White House’ And ‘1600 Pennsylvania Avenue’

Now that Lee DanielsThe Butler is off and away, it shouldn’t be surprising that this is not the first project to deal with the work and the private lives of black servants in the White House.I’m sure some of our “boomer” readers might recall the 1979 NBC 8 hour mini-series Backstairs at the White House, which chronicled the lives of black servants who worked at the White house, from the administration of William Howard Taft through the Eisenhower years, which is just around the around the time when The Butter’s Cecil Gaines starts working at the White House in the film.The mini-series was based on a memoir by a former White House maid Lillian Rogers Parks, who is played in the...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

How ‘Lee Daniels’ The Butler’ Forces Americans to Confront Civil Rights

How ‘Lee Daniels’ The Butler’ Forces Americans to Confront Civil Rights
Lee DanielsThe Butler” has a big job. Unlike its lead character, who is instructed to anticipate what the white folks want and otherwise make himself invisible in any room, Daniels’ ambitious historical portrait conspicuously privileges black audiences, bringing welcome attention to the African-American experience of the past half-century. Seeing the movie on opening night at L.A.’s Rave cinema with a mostly-black audience drove home how significant stories like this are for people of color.

It’s not a great movie, but it is an important one, seeking an entry point into a subject that studio execs have evidently decided audiences don’t care to see: namely, our country’s recent history of troubled race relations. “The Butler” even acknowledges this challenge by giving Forest Whitaker’s character the following lines late in the film: “Americans always turn a blind eye to our own. We look out to the world and judge.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Lee Daniels' The Butler' review: Oprah Winfrey and Forest Whitaker star in White House epic

  • Pop2it
Occasionally moving, sweeping in ambition yet often haphazard in execution, "Lee Daniels' The Butler" is an epic that more closely resembles a made-for-tv movie or miniseries, albeit one from the high-minded heyday of TV movies, the '70s. Think "Backstairs at the White House," if your memory goes that far back.  

Covering more than 80 years of American history through the eyes of a White House butler and his family -- decades of strife and conflict, from segregation to the election of Barack Obama to the presidency -- "The Butler" features Oscar winner Forest Whitaker in the title role, Oscar nominee Oprah Winfrey as co-star, and Oscar winners Robin Williams, Jane Fonda, Cuba Gooding Jr. and Vanessa Redgrave in supporting roles. The director of "Precious" is like catnip to actors. 

We follow a sharecropper's son who saw his father murdered by a white landowner (Alex Pettyfer) in 1920s Georgia, a boy raised to know service,
See full article at Pop2it »

Oscar Winner Celeste Holm Dies

  • PEOPLE.com
Oscar Winner Celeste Holm Dies
Academy Award winner Celeste Holm, who was the original girl who couldn't say no in Broadway's landmark musical Oklahoma! before she carved out a serious film career in the late '40s and '50s, has died, according to New York news station NY1. She was 95 and had been suffering heart and other ailments, say recent reports. A New York City native of Norwegian descent, she had studied drama at the University of Chicago before landing a series of Broadway roles, starting in a short-lived 1938 comedy called Gloriana. But it was her Ado Annie, the good-natured girl of easy virtue in Rodgers and Hammerstein's 1943 tribute to the farmer and the cowboy, that made her a star and led to a contract with 20th Century Fox. Among her movies were the ground-breaking indictment of anti-Semitism, Gentleman's Agreement (1947), for which she won the Oscar as Best Supporting Actress. She played a fashion editor who befriends the investigative journalist played by Gregory Peck. Another strong role was that of the long-suffering wife of the playwright in the film classic about the stage, 1950's All About Eve, starring Bette Davis. In lighter roles, Holm played the photographer girlfriend of the Frank Sinatra character in the musical High Society, and she had an active TV career, earning Emmy nominations for Insight and Backstairs at the White House. Married five times, Holm, on her 87th birthday, wed opera singer Frank Basile, who was 41. He survives her, as do two sons.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

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