The Silent Partner (1978) - News Poster

News

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Pyx (1973)

  • DailyDead
Redemption can be a hard ticket to punch, in real life let alone on film. An arc has to be convincing in a short space of time and make us believe our protagonist’s journey. Thanks to a brilliant performance by Karen Black and a meticulously unfurled plot, The Pyx (1973) offers sorrow and resolution in a gripping package.

Released in September by Cinepix Film Properties in our home and native land, Canada, and by Cinerama Releasing Corporation in the States the following month, The Pyx used Canadian shelter funds not to tell an exploitive tale, but rather a somber character study dressed up as a neo-noir with an occult twist. Not an easy sell to be sure, but does it really matter? At the end of the day, The Pyx is another noble attempt to infuse the genre with unusual strands regardless of the box office receipts. (I mean, my
See full article at DailyDead »

‘Batman & Bill’ Spills the Surprising Little Secret About Comics God Bob Kane

  • The Wrap
‘Batman & Bill’ Spills the Surprising Little Secret About Comics God Bob Kane
Send up the Bat-Signal: “Batman & Bill” has the inside scoop on comics king Bob Kane and his secret collaborator. The late Kane is known the world over as the creator of Batman, one of the most successful franchises in entertainment history. The superhero first appeared in DC Comics in 1939 and has since spawned TV series, movies and an endless stream of merchandise. But according to “Batman & Bill,” the documentary premiering on Hulu in May, Kane hardly deserved the sole credit he routinely receives in taglines. The silent partner in the creation was Bill Finger, a writer in Kane’s...
See full article at The Wrap »

Curtis Hanson: A Craftsman Who, in Two Movies, Touched Greatness

Curtis Hanson: A Craftsman Who, in Two Movies, Touched Greatness
Directing movies, Quentin Tarantino has said, “is a young man’s game. Directors don’t really get better as they get older…I’ve been studying all these directors’ careers, and boy, you tell me the one I haven’t thought of and I’ll bow my head.” Tarantino is right. For the most part, directors don’t get better as they get older. (The rare ones remain just as good.) There are exceptions to that rule, however, and none may be more dramatic, in its way, than the career of Curtis Hanson, who died Tuesday at 71.

For a long time, he worked under the radar. Then, in his forties, when he’d achieved a certain medium-grade commercial success, it was for making a handful of serviceable if not exactly indelible genre movies: the yuppie exploitation noir “Bad Influence” (1990), which played — with an entertaining hint of crassness — off the Rob Lowe sex-tape scandal.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Curtis Hanson Rip: 1945-2016

Curtis Hanson--Confidentially

By

Alex Simon

Curtis Hanson was my first interview with a fellow film buff and film journalist. He was nice enough to sit down with me twice, first at the Rose Cafe in Venice, then at a lunch spot in the Marina, the name of which has been lost to time. He was then kind enough to invite me to the world premiere of "L.A. Confidential" at the Chinese Theater as his guest, my first time on the red carpet at a real-life Hollywood premiere, and called me after this piece ran to thank me personally. A nice man. Hanson, and co-writer Brian Helgeland, would go on to win Best Adapted Screenplay Oscars for "L.A. Confidential."

Years later, I ran into Hanson at a book signing party for Pat York that was held in Westwood. I approached him and reminded him of our interview a decade or so earlier.
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Newswire: R.I.P. Curtis Hanson, director of L.A. Confidential

  • The AV Club
Curtis Hanson, the Oscar winner who transformed James Ellroy’s sprawling crime opus L.A. Confidential into one of the most taut noir films of the last 20 years, has died. According to Variety, he was 71.

A screenwriter as well as a director, Hanson got his start penning an H.P. Lovecraft adaptation, The Dunwich Horror, for career-launching mega-producer Roger Corman. Hanson would work with Corman again three years later, for his directorial debut, 1973’s necrophilia-themed B-movie Sweet Kill.

Hanson continued to write and direct steadily throughout the ’70s and ’80s, working with performers ranging from Elliott Gould and Christopher Plummer (in 1978’s The Silent Partner) to Tom Cruise, Shelley Long, and Jackie Earle Haley (in 1983’s Losin’ It.) In 1992, he directed Rebecca De Mornay and Annabella Sciorra in The Hand That Rocks The Cradle, his first major success. The evil-nanny flick met with middling ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Murders in the Rue Morgue / The Dunwich Horror

Look out! Here come two A.I.P. horror pix from the soggy end of the Poe cycle: the first features Jason Robards, an impressive cast and a disorganized storyline. The second is an almost-good Lovecraft horror with interesting performances from Dean Stockwell and Sandra Dee.     Murders in the Rue Morgue and The Dunwich Horror Blu-ray Color Scream Factory Street Date March 29, 2016 / 26.99

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Scream Factory's new double feature disc finishes off two different American-International horror series. The first picture is the last fright film made for the company by the directing and writing team of Gordon Hessler and Christopher Wicking. It's no gem, but it's a lot more interesting on a second viewing. The second is the company's final try to make that old joker H.P. Lovecraft into a filmic horror icon, like Edgar Allan Poe. It has a lot going for it, but also its own set of problems.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Have Yourself A Movie Little Christmas: Krampus And More!

Despite its rampaging monster approach to the holiday season and the imposing, sort-of terrifying giant horned goat-man who provides its title, Krampus isn’t, at heart, an anti-Christmas picture-- it has at least one bloodshot eye pitched toward seasonal classic status. The movie’s story is centered on a family at war with itself—semi-sophisticated suburbanites Adam Scott and Toni Collette and their kids hosting a clan of boorish, right-wing Walmart-warrior relatives headed up by David Koechner and Alison Tolman— who finds itself besieged by the impish and deadly forces of Krampus, the flip-side of holiday cheer, Darth Vader to Santa’s Obi-wan. When the only child left in the family who still clings to his belief in Santa Claus has the last vestiges of Christmas spirit (here so defined as the will to make sacrifices for the good of others) derided out of him, he tears up his last
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Croupier

A classy crime thriller, with edgy suspense and twists that can't be predicted.  Mike Hodges directs Paul Mayersberg's script about a frustrated writer who returns to casino work to find material for a book.  A young Clive Owen shines as the rakish but sensible roulette & blackjack dealer, who documents his own criminal activities. Croupier Blu-ray Hen's Tooth Video 1998 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 95 min. / Street Date November 3, 2015 / 24.95 Starring Clive Owen, Gina McKee, Kate Hardie, Alex Kingston, Nicholas Ball, Paul Reynolds, Ciro de Chiara, Rhona Mitra, Loretta Parnell. Cinematography Michael Garfath Production Designer Jon Bunker Art Direction Ian Reade-Hill, Alexander Scherer, Gernot Thöndel Film Editor Les Healey Original Music Simon Fisher-Turner Written by Paul Mayersberg Produced by Jonathan Cavendish, Marlow De Mardt, Jake Lloyd, James Mitchell, Brigid Olen, Christine Ruppert Directed by Mike Hodges

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

He: "You're my conscience." She: "Don't you have a conscience of your own?" If
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Canadian Cult Cinema: The Overlooked & Underrated

  • SoundOnSight
You love the horror, suspense thriller, action and science fiction films that make up the world of Canadian cult cinema affectionately known as Canuxploitation.

You’ve watched the entire David Cronenberg genre filmography (if not, please do so now as The Brood, Scanners and The Fly are three of the greatest horror films ever made).

You’ve seen Black Christmas and The Changeling and watched a slasher-ific marathon of Prom Night, Terror Train, Happy Birthday to Me and My Bloody Valentine.

You caught up with Cube, the Ginger Snaps series, Splice, Hobo with a Shotgun and WolfCop all while keeping close tabs on the works of Astron-6.

Yet your hunger for Canadian genre film productions and co-productions cannot be satiated.

To aid you in your deeper exploration of the field, following is a chronological look at a number of Canadian genre films that simply don’t get enough attention.

****

The Groundstar Conspiracy
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Mario Kassar interview: Carolco, Bot, Hollywood

  • Den of Geek
We chat to legendary producer Mario Kassar about the return of Carolco, its forthcoming sci-fi film Bot, Hollywood studios, and more...

First Blood. Total Recall. Terminator 2. For a generation versed in the major action films of the 80s and 90s, the Carolco brand holds a special place in the memory. Its distinctive logo became a byword for bold, often brash movies starring some of the biggest names of the day - not least Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Founded by producers Andrew Vajna and Mario Kassar in the 1970s, Carolco went from indie outsider to a company with the size and clout of a Hollywood major; the studio became famous - and infamous in some quarters - for its headline-grabbing deals. (Legend has it that, when Arnie signed up to make Terminator 2: Judgment Day, he was given a $17m private jet.)

At the height of its powers, Carolco was making smaller-scale,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Emmys 2013 winners list: Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Anna Gunn and more

"Veep" star Julia Louis-Dreyfus took home her fourth career win, and her second for her HBO comedy, at the 2013 Primetime Emmy Awards on Sunday (Sept. 22), while "Breaking Bad" actress Anna Gunn earned her first award ever for her final season as Skylar White.

The complete winners list below:

Outstanding DRAMABreaking BadDownton Abbey Game of Thrones Homeland House of Cards Mad Men

Outstanding Actress In A Drama Connie Britton, Nashville Claire Danes, Homeland Michelle Dockery, Downton Abbey Vera Farmiga, Bates Motel Elisabeth Moss, Mad Men Kerry Washington, Scandal Robin Wright, House of Cards

Outstanding Actor In A Drama Hugh Bonneville, Downton Abbey Bryan Cranston, Breaking Bad Jeff Daniels, The Newsroom Jon Hamm, Mad Men Damian Lewis, Homeland Kevin Spacey, House of Cards

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Drama Anna Gunn, Breaking Bad Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey Emilia Clarke, Game of Thrones Christine Baranski, The Good Wife Morena Baccarin, Homeland Christina Hendricks,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Cinema’s Greatest Villains: The 1970′s

Recent hot cinema topics such as the portrayal of the Mandarin character in Shane Black’s Iron Man 3 and speculations about what classic Star Trek villain Benedict Cumberbatch’s character in J.J Abrams’ Star Trek: Into Darkness was modeled after leading up to the film’s release, among others, underline the importance of great villains in genre cinema.

Creating a great cinematic villain is a difficult goal that makes for an incredibly rewarding and memorable viewer experience when it is achieved.

We’ll now take a look at the greatest film villains. Other writing on this subject tends to be a bit unfocused, as “greatest villain” articles tend to mix live-action human villains with animated characters and even animals. Many of these articles also lack a cohesive quality as they attempt to cover too much ground at once by spanning all of film history.

This article focuses on the 1970’s,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

"Life of Pi," "Anna Karenina," "Skyfall" Lead Art Directors Guild Awards

Bond, Pi, and Anna Karenina were the big winners at the 17th Annual Excellence in Production Design Awards given by the Art Directors Guild. "Skyfall" won the Contemporary category, "Life of Pi" under Fantasy, and "Anna Karenina" for the Period title.

Here's the complete list of winners/nominees; for winners/nominees of other award-giving bodies, click here:

17th Annual Excellence In Production Design Awards

Period Film

(winner) Anna Karenina

Production Designer: Sarah Greenwood

Argo

Production Designer: Sharon Seymour

Django Unchained

Production Designer: J. Michael Riva

Les MISÉRABLES

Production Designer: Eve Stewart

Lincoln

Production Designer: Rick Carter

Fantasy Film

Cloud Atlas

Production Designer: Uli Hanisch, Hugh Bateup

(winner) Life Of Pi

Production Designer: David Gropman

Prometheus

Production Designer: Arthur Max

The Dark Knight Rises

Production Designers: Nathan Crowley, Kevin Kavanaugh

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

Production Designer: Dan Hannah

Contemporary Film

Flight

Production Designer: Nelson Coates

(winner) Skyfall

Production Designer: Dennis Gassner
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

17th Annual Art Directors Guild Awards Nominees

The Art Directors Guild has announced the nominees for the 17th Annual Art Directors Guild Excellence in Production Design Awards. Winners will be announced on February 2nd at the Beverly Hilton.

Here's the complete list of nominees including television; for winners/nominees of other award-giving bodies, click here:

Nominees For Excellence In Production Design For A Feature Film In 2012

Period Film

Anna Karenina

Production Designer: Sarah Greenwood

Argo

Production Designer: Sharon Seymour

Django Unchained

Production Designer: J. Michael Riva

Les MISÉRABLES

Production Designer: Eve Stewart

Lincoln

Production Designer: Rick Carter

Fantasy Film

Cloud Atlas

Production Designer: Uli Hanisch, Hugh Bateup

Life Of Pi

Production Designer: David Gropman

Prometheus

Production Designer: Arthur Max

The Dark Knight Rises

Production Designers: Nathan Crowley, Kevin Kavanaugh

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

Production Designer: Dan Hannah

Contemporary Film

Flight

Production Designer: Nelson Coates

Skyfall

Production Designer: Dennis Gassner

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

Production Designer:
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

The Art Directors Guild (Adg) announces their nominees

  • Hollywoodnews.com
The Art Directors Guild (Adg) today announced nominations in nine categories of Production Design for theatrical motion pictures, television, commercials and music videos competing in the Adg’s 17th Annual Excellence in Production Design Awards Presented by BMW for 2012. The nominations were announced by Adg Council Chair John Shaffner and Awards co-producers Greg Grande and Raf Lydon. Deadline for final voting, which is done online, is January 31. The black-tie ceremony announcing winners will take place Saturday, February 2, 2013, from the International Ballroom of the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills with Paula Poundstone serving as host for the fourth consecutive year. Production Designer Herman Zimmerman will be the recipient of the Guild’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Hall of Fame inductees are Preston Ames, Richard MacDonald, and Edward S. Stephenson. The Production Designers behind the James Bond franchise, Sir Ken Adam, Allan Cameron, Dennis Gassner, and Peter Lamont will be honored for Outstanding Contribution to Cinematic Imagery.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Holiday Favorites 2012: Tim League, 'The Silent Partner'

  • Slackerwood
Welcome to Holiday Favorites, a series in which Slackerwood contributors and our friends talk about the movies we watch during the holiday season, holiday-related or otherwise.

Tim League, the founder and CEO of Alamo Drafthouse, tells us today about his movie choice for holiday-time, the 1978 thriller The Silent Partner (for which Curtis Hanson wrote the screenplay!):

I'm actually quite fond of quite a few Christmas classics: Silent Night Deadly Night, Black Christmas, The Magic Christmas Tree, Santa Clause Vs. Satan, etc. My favorite, though, is a movie I was introduced to via Alamo programmer Lars Nilsen: the Canuxploitation classic The Silent Partner.

I went to a Weird Wednesday screening of this years ago with no knowledge of the film and no expectations. The film popped right away with tight storytelling, complicated twists and turns, well-fleshed-out characters, a really black humor and a demonic, intense performance by the normally normal Christopher Plummer.
See full article at Slackerwood »

Film Junk Podcast Episode #368: Dark Shadows

  • FilmJunk
0:00 - Intro 2:40 - Review: Dark Shadows 31:30 - Headlines: Edgar Wright Teases Ant-Man Movie, Jody Hill to Direct a Dukes of Hazzard Reboot?, Kurt Russell Drops Out of Django Unchained, Argo Trailer, Gangster Squad Trailer 49:25 - Other Stuff We Watched: Saturday Night Live, Kicking It, English Premiere League Soccer, Demons, Demons II, Haywire, Assault on a Queen, The Asphyx, Platform Moon, Face Off, The Silent Partner, Shark Night, Road to Perdition, Ed Wood, Veep, The Pitch, Celebrity Apprentice 1:40:00 - Junk Mail: Too Negative, Director's Voices + Beakman's World vs. Bill Nye the Science Guy, Tony Stark Meets the General, Cult / Character Actors in Blockbusters, Darren Aronofsky's Noah, Being Approached by Film Junk Fans, Nothing But Trouble, Spielberg vs. Kubrick vs. Nolan vs. Tarantino 2:07:30 - This Week's DVD Releases 2:09:30 - Outro

Film Junk Podcast Episode #368: Dark Shadows by Filmjunk on
See full article at FilmJunk »

Christopher Plummer receiving Hollywood Supporting Actor Award for “Beginners” – Awards Alley

By Sean O’Connell

Hollywoodnews.com: The legendary Christopher Plummer, who has been earning raves for his performance in Mike Mills’ “Beginners” as a widower embracing his homosexuality, will receive the “Hollywood Supporting Actor Award” at this year’s 15th Annual Hollywood Film Festival and Hollywood Film Awards, presented by Starz Entertainment. The event is scheduled for Monday, Oct. 24, at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills.

Plummer, an Academy Award nominee for his recent performance in “The Last Station,” has been enjoying even more awards chatter as of late for his turn as Hal, a closeted gay man who didn’t choose to come out until his wife passed away … much to the surprise of his son (Ewan McGregor).

Plummer, who can be seen in “Barrymore” and “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” later this year, will be on hand to accept the award.

His bio is below:

Christopher Plummer
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Rose Byrne as Moira MacTaggert in X-Men: First Class

  • Filmofilia
We’re here again for the X-Men: First Class update. But this time, much prettier report, because lovely Rose Byrne (best known from titles like Get Him to the Greek, and 28 Weeks Later) is in negotiations to play Moira MacTaggert, a scientist and love interest of Charles Xavier.

How about that? Well, if you’re not so familiar with this character, here’s a little description:

Moira MacTaggert “was one of the world’s leading authorities on genetic mutation, earning her a Nobel Prize for her work. She was the longest running human associate of the X-Men and was Professor Charles Xavier’s colleague, confidante, and also once his fiancée, having met and fallen in love with him while they were postgraduates at Oxford University.

She ended their engagement when for reasons unknown she married her old flame, the late politician Joseph MacTaggert. … She eventually created a Mutant Research Center on Muir Island,
See full article at Filmofilia »

Film violence fails to deliver the shocks | Anne Billson

I miss being shocked by violence, but every routine action movie has decapitations ... there's no left field left for violence to come out of

The other day, midway through Went the Day Well?, I felt an unfamiliar emotion stirring in my breast. This slice of wartime propaganda from Ealing – directed by Alberto Cavalcanti and adapted from a short story by Graham Greene – is very different from the comedies for which the studio is best known, though our introduction to the quaint English village of Bramley End, where it takes place, makes us think we're in store for an everyday story of country folk. But the emotion I felt wasn't amusement; it was shock. To be precise, I was shocked by the violence.

How can this be? How come I was shocked by a black-and-white film made in 1942, when I can sit through the likes of Antichrist or Martyrs without flinching?
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites