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Jackie Chan to Be Awarded an Honorary Oscar

  • MovieWeb
Jackie Chan to Be Awarded an Honorary Oscar
After decades of death-defying stunts, broken bones and a ton of classic movies, martial arts legend Jackie Chan is finally getting an Oscar. Chan, along with several others, will be presented with an honorary Oscar at the Academy's 8th Annual Governors Awards on Saturday, November 12. After more than 50 years in the business, Chan has very well earned this honor.

The Academy announced on Thursday that the Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences had voted to bestow the honor to Chan, who's first acting credit dates all the way back to 1962. The actor got his first major break in the action/comedy Snake in the Eagle's Shadow in 1978, and the martial arts world has never quite been the same since. Here's what Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs had to say about it in a statement.

"The Honorary Award was created for artists like Jackie Chan,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Letters: female action stars, Kurt Russell in a dress, spoilers

Our non-interactive letters page returns, and we're chatting action, oil, fighting and cinema tickets...

Regular readers may have spotted that this is now the fourth appearance of our letters page, which we all appear to be lumbered with now. It's part of our quest to be the most old-fashioned, non-interactive website on the planet. Basically, you send us a letter, by email or post, and we answer it, and leave it at that. Bonus points for writing in with Grange Hill questions, which nobody has yet.

But you've written in with the following. So here's our latest mailbag...

Name That Film!

I am usually pretty good at investigating and finding obscure films and TV shows from my childhood. But this one eludes me. I can find no reference to it anywhere. I don’t know the title but I have vivid images of this possible film/teleplay in mind.

A
See full article at Den of Geek »

The James Clayton Column: Can the Coens make me love cats?

Feature James Clayton 24 Jan 2014 - 06:03

Inside Llewyn Davis leaves James pondering the role of cats in films, and whether the Coens can make him learn to love the furry moggies...

Llewyn Davis is a New York musician pawing around the early 60s Greenwich Village folk scene. He's a pretentious mewling creative-type who can't connect with others around him, and he's caught up in the questions of artistic integrity versus commercial success. He's a lost soul with some hair going on. Llewyn Davis has a lot in common with a certain Barton Fink, and in my mind I can picture the forlorn pair performing "Man of Constant Sorrow" as a duet.

In spite of their similarities, though, the lead of the Coen Brothers' fresh folk yarn is arguably better off than John Turturro's doomed screenwriter. Llewyn Davis (played by Oscar Isaac) has something that Fink lacks and that is a pet.
See full article at Den of Geek »

'Crouching Tiger' sequel to be directed by 'The Matrix' and 'Kill Bill' choreographer Yuen Wo Ping

  • Hitfix
'Crouching Tiger' sequel to be directed by 'The Matrix' and 'Kill Bill' choreographer Yuen Wo Ping
The Weinstein Company has announced today that production on "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon II: The Green Destiny" will begin in March of 2014 in Asia. Yuen Wo Ping is set to direct after serving as a choreographer on the original film, which was directed by Ang Lee and was nominated for 10 Academy Awards, winning four. Yuen Wo Ping helped make Jackie Chan a star, directing films like "Snake in the Eagle's Shadow" and "Drunken Master." The Wachowski siblings also tapped him for fight choreography on their 1999 cyberpunk extravaganza "The Matrix" and subsequent installments of the trilogy, as did Quentin...
See full article at Hitfix »

Jackie Chan's 1911: Revolution puts him at 100 not out

The actor's 100th movie may not be much good, but it's still a good excuse to celebrate the most human kung-fu star in the world

Jackie Chan's 100th film is, by anybody's standards, not a good one. A vanity project of the worst kind, 1911: Revolution is his version of Kevin Costner's The Postman. Even at 93 minutes, it feels about half an hour too long.

What begins as something sober and sumptuous, 1911: Revolution quickly becomes stilted and po-faced. It's ostensibly about the Xinhai revolution, in which China's last imperial dynasty was overthrown, but whatever dramatic potential that offers quickly gets lost in the endless explanatory text and the meandering subplots about railway finances. The toe-curlingly awkward tracts of English-language sequences don't help (at one point an American character exclaims: "Chinese revolution is the only thing that can make exciting history!") as does the fact that Jackie Chan
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Votd: 25 Actors Before They Were Famous, in 3 Minutes

Votd: 25 Actors Before They Were Famous, in 3 Minutes
[1] I've always had this fascination with seeing current rich and famous figures in their humble beginnings, and the success of tabloid columns and webpages devoted to that very topic suggest I'm not the only one. When some A-list faces are as familiar to us as those of our actual loved ones, seeing long-ago photos or videos of them is amusing in the same way that seeing pictures of your friends as little kids is amusing. "Before They Were Famous: 25 Actors in 3 Minutes" collects some especially amusing snippets of today's biggest stars, including Angelina Jolie, Ryan Gosling, Jack Nicholson, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt, in some of their earliest acting gigs. Watch the video after the jump. They're not all first-time roles -- I'd argue that Seth Rogen in Donnie Darko hardly counts as even a pre-fame role, as he'd already starred in Freaks & Geeks by then -- but the clips collected here
See full article at Slash Film »

Looking back at Encounters Of The Spooky Kind

A unique mix of horror, martial arts action and comedy, Encounters Of The Spooky Kind is a classic of Hong Kong cinema. Ryan takes a look back…

What elements do you need to create a genuinely entertaining film? Action? Comedy? Horror? Great characters? An unnerving air of unpredictability? The 1980 Hong Kong movie, Encounters Of The Spooky Kind, has all those elements and more. It's a strange, supernatural brew of mild gore, frequently hilarious comedy, and some of the most extraordinary kung fu sequences ever committed to film.

Following Jacob Walker's excellent article on the world of supernatural kung fu movies earlier this month (linked at the bottom), I was inspired to return to Encounters Of The Spooky Kind (also known as Gui da Gui, which means Ghost Fights Ghost), the film that popularised an entire subgenre of Jiang Shi (or stiff corpse) Hong Kong action cinema. Even after a fourth or fifth viewing,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Yuen Woo Ping Picks His Five Favorite Fight Scenes

  • IFC
Yuen Woo Ping Picks His Five Favorite Fight Scenes
Though he's hardly a household name (at least in the United States) it's no exaggeration to say that Yuen Woo Ping is one of the most influential filmmakers on the planet. As the director of 1978's "Snake in Eagle's Shadow," Yuen helped launch the career of Jackie Chan and define his unique style of comedic kung fu. He went on to direct or choreograph the fights in almost every major Chinese martial arts film of the last quarter century, and when he brought his unique style to America in "The Matrix" in 1999, he revolutionized the way Hollywood action films were made for years. Yuen Woo Ping's new film as both director and fight choreographer is called "True Legend," but it's a title that might just as well be bestowed upon Yuen himself.

In honor of "True Legend"'s U.S. release this week, we asked Yuen to do something
See full article at IFC »

Classic Poster for Yuen Woo-Ping's Martial Arts Flick 'True Legend'

Any martial arts / kung fu fans out there? You've got to check this out! AICN has debuted a classic poster for True Legend, the newest martial arts epic from Yuen Woo-Ping, kung fu choreographer on The Matrix films, Kill Bill 1 and 2, Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon and Fearless, and director of numerous martial arts classics including Snake in Eagle's Shadow, Twin Warriors and Iron Monkey. I saw the movie at Fantastic Fest last year and loved it (here's my write-up about it), it's an awesome kung fu flick that has some amazing fight scenes, as Woo-Ping really is the master. The poster really makes me want to see it again. Check it out! You can check out a full-size version of the True Legend poster originally on Ain't It Cool News if you wish. Su Qi-Er (Man Cheuk Chiu) is a wealthy man living during the Qing Dynasty who loses ...
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Interview: Yuen Woo-Ping

  • Moviefone
Filed under: Celebrity Interviews, New Releases, Cinematical, Festivals

It's not a desperate attempt to tie in the title of his latest film, nor undeservedly effusive praise, to call fight choreographer and filmmaker Yuen Woo-Ping a true legend. He was an actor in 40 movies between 1965 and 1993, choreographed at least 39 others, and directed 29, including 'True Legend,' a retelling of the saga of mythic Chinese hero Su Qi-Er -- whom he basically introduced to audiences via his classic 1978 film 'Drunken Master.' It is nevertheless appropriate that Yuen would be honored at this year's Fantastic Fest, where in addition to receiving a Lifetime Achievement Award, he screened 'True Legend' for attendees as part of a double feature that also included his first film, 'Snake in the Eagle's Shadow.'

Cinematical sat down with Yuen at the festival for a chat both about 'True Legend' and about his rich and accomplished history as a fight choreographer and filmmaker.
See full article at Moviefone »

Interview With 'True Legend' Director Yuen Woo-Ping

Interview With 'True Legend' Director Yuen Woo-Ping
Filed under: Celebrity Interviews, New Releases, Cinematical, Festivals

It's not a desperate attempt to tie in the title of his latest film, nor undeservedly effusive praise, to call fight choreographer and filmmaker Yuen Woo-Ping a true legend. He was an actor in 40 movies between 1965 and 1993, choreographed at least 39 others, and directed 29, including 'True Legend,' a retelling of the saga of mythic Chinese hero Su Qi-Er -- whom he basically introduced to audiences via his classic 1978 film 'Drunken Master.' It is nevertheless appropriate that Yuen would be honored at this year's Fantastic Fest, where in addition to receiving a Lifetime Achievement Award, he screened 'True Legend' for attendees as part of a double feature that also included his first film, 'Snake in the Eagle's Shadow.'

Cinematical sat down with Yuen at the festival for a chat both about 'True Legend' and about his rich and accomplished history as a fight choreographer and filmmaker.
See full article at Cinematical »

Honoring the Master: Yuen Woo-Ping's Lifetime Acheivement Award at Fantastic Fest

Honoring the Master: Yuen Woo-Ping's Lifetime Acheivement Award at Fantastic Fest
Filed under: Cinematical, Festivals

Last year Fantastic Fest further canonized its commitment to the legacy of cinema by instituting the Lifetime Achievement Award. True to form, the filmmakers recognized not only contributed to the scope of film as a whole, but whose careers are fraught with the kind of total genre experiences that reinforce the core values of this festival. The first recipient was the master of undeniably artistic sleaze: Jess Franco ('Venus in Furs'). This year saw awards bestowed to true living legends: Roger & Julie Corman and Yuen Woo-ping.

For those of you unfamiliar with this demigod of the martial arts world, Yuen Woo-ping's most universally recognized work would be the fight choreography on 'The Matrix'. But though arguably his most career-defining film, Woo-ping has been turning heads, and shattering bones, for nearly 40 years. In honor of his award, and in acknowledgment of the breadth of his film catalog,
See full article at Cinematical »

Fantastic Fest's Unforgettable Events: Yuen Woo Ping's Tribute

How many film festivals can you go to where the RZA himself presents a Lifetime Achievement award in the form of a sword to filmmaker & martial arts choreographer Yuen Woo Ping before screening his new film True Legend. Oh and after watching that and a fascinating Q&A, they showed a print of the first film Woo Ping directed, Snake in Eagle's Shadow. And if you're still not tired then, you can go and sing karaoke at an all-night party held at the Alamo Drafthouse's sister lounge, The Highball. Yep, that is Fantastic Fest for you, and there's nothing like it in the world. And I keep coming back every year because it's that awesome. I had to take a quick trip back to Los Angeles, so my first day at Fantastic Fest consisted of watching Patrick Hughes' Red Hill, a kind of modern Aussie western, Yuen Woo Ping
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Fantastic Fest is Honoring Martial Arts Legend Yuen Woo-Ping

Another great announcement regarding Fantastic Fest next month. Fantastic Fest will honor director and master fight choreographer Yuen Woo-Ping with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the world premiere of his new martial arts fantasy True Legend (seen above), starring Vincent Zhao (Dragon Gets Angry), Zhou Xun (The Emperor and the Assassin) with Michelle Yeoh (Babylon A.D.) and the late David Carradine (Kill Bill). We actually featured a trailer for True Legend late last year, which you can still watch right here. That movie will play as part of a double feature with Snake in the Eagle's Shadow, Woo-Ping's directorial debut. Besides the numerous films he's directed, Yuen Woo-Ping is also known as one of the greatest martial arts choreographers of all-time who has choreographed many of the unforgettable fights in films like The Matrix trilogy, Kill Bill Vol. 1 & 2, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Iron Monkey, Drunken Master, Once Upon ...
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Legendary Fight Choreographer Yuen Woo-Ping to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award at Fantastic Fest

Legendary Fight Choreographer Yuen Woo-Ping to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award at Fantastic Fest
With each new press release, Fantastic Fest - which is no longer just Austin's premiere genre film festival since it is now the largest of its kind in the entire Us - keeps getting better and better. Ff have already announced a host of drool-worthy action, horror, sci-fi and just plain oddball films from around the world as part of its programming slate (there are around 30 known titles thus far with even more to come), but the fest isn't just about screenings. No, in true Alamo Drafthouse fashion, it's also about the special events.

So far we've heard about: Fantastic Arcade, a spotlight on indie game developers that will be set up at The Highball, a bar next to the main theater owned and operated by Drafthouse founder Tim League; Nevermore... An Evening With Edgar Allen Poe, a special presentation of Jeffrey Combs' one-man stage play directed by Stuart Gordon
See full article at Cinematical »

Trailer: Yuen Woo-Ping’s True Legend

In 1978 he achieved his first directing credit on the seminal Snake in the Eagle's Shadow, starring Jackie Chan, then quickly followed with the similar Drunken Master. The films were smash-hits, launching Jackie Chan as a major film-star. He went on to work with such figures as Sammo Hung in Magnificent Butcher (1979), Yuen Biao in Dreadnaught (1981), Donnie Yen in several films including Iron Monkey (1993), and Jet Li and Michelle Yeoh in several films including Tai Chi Master (1993) and Wing Chun (1994). His work, particularly his action choreography on Fist of Legend (1994), attracted the attention of the Wachowski brothers, who hired him as the kung-fu choreographer on The Matrix (1999). The success of this collaboration, plus his action choreography on the following year's hit Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, made him a highly sought after figure in Hollywood. He went on to work on the Matrix sequels and Kill Bill (2003). It's been 12 years since Yuen Woo-ping,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

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