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Jelani Cobb Tapped for Writers Guild East’s Walter Bernstein Award

The Writers Guild of America East has named “Policing the Police” filmmaker Jelani Cobb as the inaugural winner of its Walter Bernstein Award.

Cobb will be presented with the honor at the 69th annual Writers Guild Awards at New York’s Edison Ballroom on Feb. 19. The award is presented “to honor writers who have demonstrated with creativity, grace and bravery a willingness to confront social injustice in the face of adversity.”

“Policing the Police,” which aired in June as part of the PBS investigative series “Frontline,” explores the complexities involved in reforming the Newark Police Department and its fractured relationship with the community. Cobb embedded with two detectives in the Newark Police Department’s gang unit to witness firsthand how undercover officers operate following a 2014 report from the U.S. Department of Justice that showed Newark’s police had engaged in a pattern of unconstitutional conduct.

Bernstein, who is 97, became
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jelani Cobb Tapped for Writers Guild East’s Walter Bernstein Award

The Writers Guild of America East has named “Policing the Police” filmmaker Jelani Cobb as the inaugural winner of its Walter Bernstein Award.

Cobb will be presented with the honor at the 69th annual Writers Guild Awards at New York’s Edison Ballroom on Feb. 19. The award is presented “to honor writers who have demonstrated with creativity, grace and bravery a willingness to confront social injustice in the face of adversity.”

“Policing the Police,” which aired in June as part of the PBS investigative series “Frontline,” explores the complexities involved in reforming the Newark Police Department and its fractured relationship with the community. Cobb embedded with two detectives in the Newark Police Department’s gang unit to witness firsthand how undercover officers operate following a 2014 report from the U.S. Department of Justice that showed Newark’s police had engaged in a pattern of unconstitutional conduct.

Bernstein, who is 97, became a member of the WGA East in
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Lee Marvin Died 29 Years Ago Today – Here Are His Ten Best Films

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Lee Marvin rose through the ranks of movie stardom as a character actor, delivering mostly villainous supporting turns in many films before finally graduating to leading roles. Regardless of which side of the law he was on however, he projected a tough-as-nails intensity and a two-fisted integrity which elevated even the slightest material. Born February 19, 1924, in New York City, Marvin quit high school to enter the Marine Corps and while serving in the South Pacific was badly wounded in battle when a machine gun nest shot off part of his buttocks and severed his sciatic nerve. He spent a year in recovery before returning to the U.S. where he began working as a plumber. The acting bug bit after filling in for an ailing summer-stock actor and he studied the art at the New York-based American Theater Wing. Upon making his debut in summer stock,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Happy 80th Burt-day to Burt Reynolds! – Here Are His Ten Best Movies

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, Travis Keune, and Tom Stockman

Burt Reynolds, one of We Are Movie Geeks favorite actors, turns 80 today. Happy Birthday Burt!

On February 11th, 1936, Reynolds was born in Waycross, Georgia, before his family moved to Jupiter Florida, where his father served as Chief of Police. Young Burt excelled at sports and played football at Florida State University. He became an All Star Southern Conference halfback (and was earmarked by the Baltimore Colts) before injuries sidelined his football career. He dropped out of college and headed to New York with dreams of becoming an actor. There he worked in restaurants and clubs while pulling the odd TV job or theater role. Burt was spotted in a New York City stage production of Mister Roberts and signed to a TV contract and eventually had recurring roles in such shows as Gunsmoke (1955), Riverboat (1959) and his own series, Hawk
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Prime Cut | Blu-ray Review

Lovers of odd and neglected vintage cinema can rejoice in the repackaging of Michael Ritchie’s weird sophomore title, Prime Cut. With all the menace of a Dick Francis novel and a perverse comedic streak akin to the tastes of John Waters, this misbegotten feature hasn’t received the notable following it deserves for one glaring reason—it’s increasingly warped treatment of women, which may have seemed enlightened for the period, but eventually only adds to the problematic misogyny that never abates. As far as its handling of more sensational, exploitational elements, Ritchie and screenwriter Robert Dillon manage to smooth its edges with breakneck pacing, sarcastic repartee, and a handful of impressively orchestrated face-offs.

The head of the Irish mob in Chicago hires Nick Devlin (Lee Marvin), an enforcer, to travel to Kansas City and collect money he’s owed by Mary Ann (Gene Hackman), the man who runs
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Walter Bernstein At New York Screening Of "The Front" (1976, New York City, Thursday March 6- Free Seminar

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro has received the following press release:

The Hollywood Blacklist, with Screenwriter Walter Bernstein\

When: Thursday, March 6, 6:30 pm

Where: The New School, The Auditorium at 66 West 12th St (between 5th and 6th Aves.)

Register: visit www.cencom.org, e-mail info@cencom.org or call (212) 686-5005

In the late 1940s and throughout the 1950s, Sen. Joseph McCarthy carried out a witch hunt for Communists that led to the creation of the infamous Hollywood blacklist, resulting in 150 directors, actors, writers, and others in the entertainment business, being banned from making a living for over a decade.

Don't miss our screening of The Front, written by Walter Bernstein, who received an Oscar nomination for best screenplay in 1976, and directed by Martin Ritt. Both were victims of the blacklist themselves. The movie takes a comedic look at what happened during this dark period in American History. Screening to be followed by a conversation and Q&A.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Blu-ray Release: The Front

Blu-ray Release Date: Feb. 25, 2014

Price: Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Twilight Time

Woody Allen stars in The Front.

Woody Allen (To Rome with Love) stars in his first dramatic role (well, let’s call it laugh-tinged dramatic) in the 1976 comedy drama The Front, making its Blu-ray premiere courtesy of Twilight Time.

Allen is Howard Prince, a nebbishy cashier/part-time bookie who, during the McCarthy-era communist witch-hunt, does a favor for an old school friend, a blacklisted TV writer (Michael Murphy, Nashville). As his pal’s “front”—representing the scribe’s work as his own and collecting ten percent of the profits—the apolitical schlemiel is soon enjoying not just the money but the perks, including the love of a sophisticated young producer (Andrea Marcovicci, Irene in Time). But in an atmosphere of fear, nobody’s above suspicion, and Howard’s growing friendship with unfairly accused blacklisted performer Hecky Brown (Zero Mostel, The Producers
See full article at Disc Dish »

Top Ten Tuesday – The Best of Burt Reynolds

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, Travis Keune, and Tom Stockman

We like to celebrate the movie tough guys of the ’70s here at We Are Movie Geeks and at Super-8 Movie Madness. We’ve posted Top Ten lists to tie into Super-8 shows featuring Charles Bronson (Here), Clint Eastwood (Here), and Lee Marvin (Here). This month we’re going to honor the #1 top money-making star for five consecutive years – 1978 – 1982 – Burt Reynolds. On February 11th, 1936, Reynolds was born in Waycross, Georgia, before his family moved to Jupiter Florida, where his father served as Chief of Police. Young Burt excelled at sports and played football at Florida State University. He became an All Star Southern Conference halfback (and was earmarked by the Baltimore Colts) before injuries sidelined his football career. He dropped out of college and headed to New York with dreams of becoming an actor. There he worked in restaurants
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Top Ten Tuesday – The Best of Lee Marvin

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

We’re celebrating one of Hollywood’s great tough guys and one of our favorite actors September 6th at The Way Out Club in St. Louis with Super-8 Lee Marvin Movie Madness.

Lee Marvin rose through the ranks of movie stardom as a character actor, delivering mostly villainous supporting turns in many films before finally graduating to leading roles. Regardless of which side of the law he was on however, he projected a tough-as-nails intensity and a two-fisted integrity which elevated even the slightest material. Born February 19, 1924, in New York City, Marvin quit high school to enter the Marine Corps and while serving in the South Pacific was badly wounded in battle when a machine gun nest shot off part of his buttocks and severed his sciatic nerve. He spent a year in recovery before returning to the U.S. where
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Jill Clayburgh obituary

Witty and sophisticated American film star known for her role in An Unmarried Woman

The actor Jill Clayburgh, who has died of leukaemia aged 66, was one of the brightest female stars of the 1970s, yet was somewhat forgotten in the decade that followed. "If they don't give me good parts in movies, I'm just not going to do them. And there's a time when they just move on to the next person," Clayburgh said prophetically at the height of her fame in 1978. Perhaps conservative Hollywood did not really know how to cope with an independent-minded, intelligent performer who refused to be pigeonholed.

Born in Manhattan, New York, Clayburgh was the daughter of wealthy parents. Her father was the vice-president of two large companies and her mother was a secretary to the Broadway producer David Merrick. As a child, Clayburgh was inspired to become an actor when she saw Jean Arthur
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Jill Clayburgh obituary

Witty and sophisticated American film star known for her role in An Unmarried Woman

The actor Jill Clayburgh, who has died of leukaemia aged 66, was one of the brightest female stars of the 1970s, yet was somewhat forgotten in the decade that followed. "If they don't give me good parts in movies, I'm just not going to do them. And there's a time when they just move on to the next person," Clayburgh said prophetically at the height of her fame in 1978. Perhaps conservative Hollywood did not really know how to cope with an independent-minded, intelligent performer who refused to be pigeonholed.

Born in Manhattan, New York, Clayburgh was the daughter of wealthy parents. Her father was the vice-president of two large companies and her mother was a secretary to the Broadway producer David Merrick. As a child, Clayburgh was inspired to become an actor when she saw Jean Arthur
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jill Clayburgh Dead At 66

Jill Clayburgh Dead At 66
Jill Clayburgh, an Academy Award-nominated actress best remembered for her roles in An Unmarried Woman and Starting Over, died after a long battle with lymphatic cancer today at the age of 66 in her home in Connecticut. A veteran of stage, film and television, she could be seen in a variety of work, including Portnoy's Complaint, Semi-Tough, Running With Scissors, Ally McBeal and Nip/Tuck. Her last film role, playing Jake Gyllenhaal's mother in Love and Other Drugs, will be released in two weeks. [Deadline]
See full article at Movieline »

Actress Jill Clayburgh Dead At 66

  • CinemaRetro
Actress Jill Clayburgh has died at age 66 after losing a 21 year battle with leukemia. Clayburgh was credited with being one of the important actresses to usher in a new era of quality roles for women in the 1970s. She received two Oscar nominations: for the 1978 film An Unmarried Woman and the 1979 comedy Starting Over. Clayburgh was married to Tony winning playwright David Rabe. Her connections to the theater extended back to her childhood - her mother was secretary to legendary Broadway showman David Merrick. Clayburgh's elite upbringing (her father was vice-president of two major corporations) did not spare her from a troubled youth. Her rebelious ways led her to psychiatric care at the tender age of 9. Once immersed in the acting profession, however, she thrived on screen, stage and TV. Among her major feature films: Semi-Tough, Silver Streak, Gable and Lombard and Bertolucci's Luna. She also appeared in many major TV series over the decades.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Oscar Nominated Actress Jill Clayburgh Dies Aged 66

Jill Clayburgh, whose performance in An Unmarried Woman reflected the growing women’s liberation movement, died Friday at her home in Lakeville. She was 66 years old.

The actress, who had recently finished two seasons as the rich matriarch of ABC’S Dirty Sexy Money, had apparently been battling chronic lymphocytic leukemia for an astonishing 21 years according to her husband David Rabe.

“She dealt with the disease courageously, quietly and privately”, Rabe said, and “made it into an opportunity for her children to grow and be human.”

The actress won an Oscar nomination for 1978′s Woman directed by Paul Mazursky. And she shared best actress honors at Cannes with Isabelle Huppert for her portrayal of a young, comfortable woman who finds her world is shattered when her husband surprises her by asking for a divorce.

Clayburgh was an incredibly versatile talent with a distinctive, unique style. In 1978, Cue magazine described her “winsome naturalness,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Jill Clayburgh: 1944 - 2010

  • IMDb News
Jill Clayburgh: 1944 - 2010
Jill Clayburgh, the Oscar-nominated actress whose portrayal of suddenly single women in the 1970s helped define feminism in movies and reshape the role of leading lady, died today at her home in Lakeville, Connecticut; she was 66.

A stage actress who started appearing onscreen in the 70s, she suddenly became the "It Girl" -- or rather, "It Woman" -- with her acclaimed performance as an upper-class Manhattan wife suddenly left by her husband in the comedy-drama An Unmarried Woman. For a brief time one of Hollywood's most recognizable actresses in both comedy and drama, her career took a rapid decline in the 80s before she resuscitated her career with a number of television and film roles. Still, despite her career ups and downs, she remained one of the most important actresses of the 70s, alongside Jane Fonda, Glenda Jackson, Diane Keaton, and the young Meryl Streep (with whom she was friends) -- women whose films were marked by their portrayals of strong, independent women who didn't need a man to complete their lives and were prepared to take a stand by doing so.

Born in New York City to a manufacturing executive father and a mother who was the production secretary for theatrical producer David Merrick, Clayburgh had a privileged Upper East Side upbringing, attending the noted Brearley Academy and then Sarah Lawrence College. After joining the Charles Street Repertory Theater in Boston, she worked primarily onstage, moving to Broadway for such shows as Pippin and The Rothschilds.

After sporadic film and TV appearances (including a stint on the soap opera Search for Tomorrow), Clayburgh nabbed her first big role in 1972's Portnoy's Complaint. Roles in TV shows such as Medical Center, Maude, and The Rockford Files followed (she received an Emmy nomination for the 1975 TV movie Hustling), before she essayed the role of Carole Lombard opposite James Brolin's Clark Gable in the critically lambasted Gable and Lombard (1976). The lavish biopic was soundly drubbed and might have marked the end of her career had it not been for a number of acclaimed performances and box office hits in rapid succession. Clayburgh earned acclaimed opposite Peter Falk in the TV cancer drama Griffin and Phoenix: A Love Story (1976) and that same year co-starred opposite Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor in the blockbuster hit comedy Silver Streak. She held her own against two other high-profile, wildly popular leading men--Burt Reynolds and Kris Kristofferson--in the football comedy Semi-Tough (1977) before landing the role that would make her a superstar of the decade: Erica in Paul Mazursky's An Unmarried Woman.

The story of a well-to-do wife and mother who is left by her husband for a younger woman, and attempts to reclaim her identity as a single woman in a world marked by the rise of feminism, the film was a lightning rod for many of the issues of the late 70s, from divorce to sexual liberation. With its message that it was okay not to be married, the film was a box office and critical hit, winning Clayburgh the Best Actress award at the Cannes Film Festival. An Unmarried Woman would receive three Oscar nominations, including Best Picture and Actress, but lost both awards to Vietnam-themed dramas The Deer Hunter and Coming Home (Jane Fonda was the Best Actress winner).

Anointed as the screen's quintessential liberated woman, Clayburgh followed that film in 1979 with two wildly disparate roles, as an opera singer who seduces her 15 year old son in Bernardo Bertolucci's Luna, and as a slightly ditzy kindergarten teacher who falls in love with a recently divorced Burt Reynolds in the comedy Starting Over. The former film was reviled by critics, while the latter earner her a second Academy Award nomination (surprisingly, she received Golden Globe nominations for both films).

The early 80s saw Clayburgh play two more independent women in the comedies It's My Turn and First Monday in October, as well as a Valium addict in the adaptation of the bestselling memoir I'm Dancing As Fast As I Can. But as the 80s came under the influence of the Reagan administration and lost interest in the burgeoning feminist movement, roles for Clayburgh became less easy to attain, and a string of film flops followed throughout the decade. Roles in low-budget movies and telefilms followed, though it was through a number of television appearances in the late 90s and early 2000s that Clayburgh revitalized her career on the small screen: there were acclaimed but failed sitcoms Everything's Relative and Leap of Faith, and a well-received turn as the mother of Calista Flockhart's titular character in the hit show Ally McBeal.

After appearances on The Practice and Nip/Tuck (the latter earning her a second Emmy nomination), she co-starred in the TV series Dirty Sexy Money opposite Donald Sutherland as the matriarch of a wealthy New York family. In the mid-2000s Clayburgh also starred on Broadway in Richard Greenberg's A Naked Girl on the Appian Way and in the 2006 revival of Barefoot in the Park. Her most recent roles include the upcoming comedy-drama Love and Other Drugs, as well as next year's Bridesmaids.

Clayburgh married acclaimed playwright David Rabe (Hurlyburly, Streamers) in 1979; she is survived by Rabe and their daughter, actress Lily Rabe, who will be appearing opposite Al Pacino, with whom Clayburgh was involved in the early 70s, in the new Broadway production of The Merchant of Venice, which has currently been delayed.

November DVD Playhouse

DVD Playhouse—November 2010

By Allen Gardner

Paths Of Glory (Criterion) Stanley Kubrick’s 1957 antiwar classic put him on the map as a major filmmaker. Kirk Douglas stars in a true story about a French officer in Ww I who locks horns with the military’s top brass after his men are court-martialed for failing to carry out an obvious suicide mission. A perfect film, across the board, with fine support from George Macready as one of the most despicable martinet’s ever captured on film, Ralph Meeker, and Adolphe Menjou, all oily charm as a conniving General. Also available on Blu-ray disc. Bonuses: Audio commentary by critic Gary Giddins; Excerpt from 1966 audio interview with Kubrick; 1979 interview with Douglas; New interviews with Jan Harlan, Christiane Kubrick, and producer James B. Harris; French television documentary on real-life case which inspired the film; Trailer. Widescreen. Dolby 1.0 mono.

Winter’S Bone (Lionsgate) After her deadbeat father disappears,
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Jill Clayburgh Passes Away at Age 66

Oscar-nominated Jill Clayburgh passed away on Friday at her home in Lakeville, Connecticut at the age of 66, reports The New York Times . The cause was chronic leukemia, with which she had lived for 21 years, her husband, the playwright David Rabe, said. Clayburgh received an Oscar nomination for starring in 1978's An Unmarried Woman , directed by Paul Mazursky. She also received an Oscar nomination for Starting Over (1979), directed by Alan J. Pakula. Her other credits include Semi-Tough (1977), It's My Turn (1980), First Monday in October (1981) and I'm Dancing as Fast as I Can (1982). Her many television credits include guest appearances on "Law & Order," "The Practice" and "Nip/Tuck," and a recurring role on "Ally...
See full article at Comingsoon.net »

Ron Silver Dies at 62

Variety reports that actor Ron Silver died Sunday at the age of 62 following a two-year battle with esophageal cancer. Silver is an Emmy nominee for his recurring role on “The West Wing” and has a long history of balancing acting with left-leaning social and political causes. He also won a Tony Award as a take-no-prisoners Hollywood producer in David Mamet’s original production of “Speed-the-Plow” in 1988. Silver’s big-screen credits include Ali, Reversal of Fortune, Enemies: A Love Story, Silkwood, Semi-Tough and most recently The Ten and Find Me Guilty. He also narrated 2004’s Fahrenhype 9/11, which deconstructed Michael Moore’s anti-Bush documentary Fahrenheit 9/11. Besides “The West Wing,” Silver was a regular or had [...]
See full article at ShockYa »

Actor Ron Silver dies at 62

Actor Ron Silver dies at 62
Actor Ron Silver, who won a Tony Award as a take-no-prisoners Hollywood producer in David Mamet's "Speed-the-Plow" and did a political about-face from loyal Democrat to Republican activist after the Sept. 11 attacks, died Sunday at age 62.

"Ron Silver died peacefully in his sleep with his family around him early Sunday morning" in New York, said Robin Bronk, executive director of the Creative Coalition, which Silver helped found. "He had been fighting esophageal cancer for two years."

Silver, an Emmy nominee for a recurring role as a slick strategist for liberal President Jed Bartlet on "The West Wing," had a long history of balancing acting with left-leaning social and political causes.

But after the 2001 terrorist attacks, longtime Democrat Silver turned heads in Hollywood with outspoken support of President George W. Bush over the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Silver spoke at the 2004 Republican National Convention, began referring to himself as
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

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