Oliver's Story (1978) - News Poster

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Arrow Finale Ends Season 5 with a Bang: Who Might Not Have Survived?

Arrow Finale Ends Season 5 with a Bang: Who Might Not Have Survived?
Caution! This article contains spoilers for tonight's finale of Arrow, so if you haven't watched, get off the island!  Prometheus may be dead, but he's probably not the only one. Season five's big bad pulled out all the stops to really make Oliver Queen (Stephen Amell) very, very mad in tonight's finale. Chase (Josh Segarra) had kidnapped every single person he loved or even cared at all for, forcing Oliver to gather up all his favorite villains to help take him down, and everything just had to go down back where Oliver's story began: on Lian Yu.  Nearly everything Oliver and his little team of supervillains got up to turned out to be a trap, but they did manage to...
See full article at E! Online »

Arrow season 4 episode 23 review: Schism

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Arrow's problem is that it's become a show about itself, wallowing and refusing to move forward. Here's our review of the season 4 finale...

This review contains spoilers.

4.23 Schism

The crossovers weren't the problem; the flashbacks weren't the problem; the character deaths weren't the problem. Right now in the ever-shrinking community of fans and writers still invested in Arrow, there's a fair bit of scrambling around looking for answers as to why season four of Arrow has been such a disappointment. For me, those details – as much as they irk me – aren't the whole picture.

Arrow has been having an identity crisis since it started spinning off into brighter, less introspective areas of the multiverse, but that's not necessarily Arrow's fault. While most people have been calling for the show to be lighter and more fun post-Flash and Supergirl, what it's done instead is double-down on
See full article at Den of Geek »

Arrow season 4 episode 11 review: A.W.O.L.

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Arrow season 4's latest filler episode delivers two sidekick-centric storylines for Felicity and Diggle...

This review contains spoilers.

4.11 A.W.O.L.

Until now, Arrow has always, disappointingly, made the struggles of its supporting characters all about Oliver. When it was confirmed that the outcome of Darhk's attack would leave Felicity wheelchair-bound, it was a significant worry that her paralysis would simply be an excuse for the show to backtrack on Oliver's attitude adjustment. He doesn't handle tragedy well and, despite his relatively lighthearted demeanour this season, old habits die hard.

And to a certain extent this can be expected given the fact that Oliver is the show's solo protagonist. But at a certain point fans attach to the supporting cast and, on Arrow especially, the hero becomes one of the least interesting ingredients in the recipe.

What a relief, then, that the episode decided to focus
See full article at Den of Geek »

'Arrow': The Big Problem with Oliver's Son

  • BuddyTV
'Arrow': The Big Problem with Oliver's Son
For the most part, The Flash and Arrow crossover was strong, The craziness and stakes got dialed up to eleven. It was a great showcase for both Oliver and Barry. It showed the depth of the friendship that has grown between the two heroes. "Legends of Today" and "Legends of Yesterday" were just a lot of fun even if both episodes were really just more set up for the new spin-off series Legends of Tomorrow

There was just one big mistake. (Well, two if you count Carter being the whitest man alive and playing an ancient prince of Egypt -- and you should.) For all the positives of the Flash and Arrow crossover there was a major misstep involving Oliver's story with his newly discovered son, William. The fault lies not just in "Legends of Yesterday" and how William was introduced, but how the inclusion of William's existence will negatively
See full article at BuddyTV »

Arrow season 3 episode 14 review: The Return

Arrow's flashbacks continue to be the weakest link in an otherwise solid show, as The Return demonstrates...

This review contains spoilers.

3.14 The Return

There was a point somewhere near to the end of Arrow's first season when I just stopped really trying to cover the show's flashbacks in these reviews. The fact that it could be done without really missing anything major says a heck of a lot about the general importance of those minutes we're subjected to every week, but then every season we're served an episode like The Return, and there's a problem.

The flashbacks in season three have been even less engaging than those of past seasons, taking the action away from Lian Yu and moving it to the comparatively drab Hong Kong, with characters we're only mildly interested in and a crushing sense of inevitability when it comes to Oliver's story.

While the odd
See full article at Den of Geek »

Casting: Jason Bateman Is An 'Ipo Man,' Hailee Steinfeld Finds 'Love At First Sight' And More

Hailee Steinfeld ("True Grit," "Ender's Game") has put the wheels in motion for Dustin Lance Black's "The Statistical Probability Of Love At First Sight" by joining the film. Based on the book by Jennifer E. Smith, the story takes place over 24 hours and follows Hadley, who's stuck at John F. Kennedy Airport and late to her father's second wedding in London. She meets the perfect boy in the airport's cramped waiting area: his name is Oliver, he's British, he's in seat 18B and Hadley's in 18A. Hadley and Oliver's story about family connections, second chances and first loves will make you believe that true love finds you when you're least expecting it. Awwwww. Jason Bateman is "Ipo Man," and no, he's not a superhero. Instead, it's Bateman's latest directing and acting vehicle, based on the Wired article, "Meet The Man Who Sold His Fate To Investors At $1 A Share,
See full article at The Playlist »

John Barrowman Bumped Up To Series Regular For Arrow Season 3

Series star Stephen Amell has more or less confirmed that John Barrowman, who plays Malcolm Merlyn, will be made a series regular for Season 3. This is probably not surprising news, especially after the events of last night's season finale. How Oliver's story plays into Merlyn & Thea's is yet to be seen. The CW hasn't made an official announcement yet, but one should be expected shortly. Check out Amell's tweet below: #Arrow has a new series regular. @Team_Barrowman -- What could go wrong?!?! pic.twitter.com/VgFQdQhKNq — Stephen Amell (@amellywood) May 15, 2014 After a violent shipwreck, billionaire playboy Oliver Queen (Stephen Amell) was missing and presumed dead for five years before being discovered alive on a remote island in the Pacific. He returned home to Starling City, bent on righting the wrongs of his family and fighting injustice. To do this, he creates the persona of the Arrow and allies himself
See full article at ComicBookMovie »

Arrow Round Table: "The Huntress Returns"

  • TVfanatic
We're back!

The Arrow Round Table took a short hiatus, but we've returned to chat about "The Huntress Returns," which seems like an appropriate time to make a reappearance, no? Joining me at the table are TV Fanatic staff writers Kat Brooks, Nick McHatton, Carla Day and someone new to TV Fanatic, Henry (Hank) Otero. Hank has his own entertainment blog, Hank09.com, and you can find him under Henry A Otero with a very active following on Google+, where he manages over a dozen TV related G+ pages. Welcome, Hank!

Readers, things are heating up on Arrow and there was a lot to talk about with the return of Helena. Let's get down to business! Please join in with your own answers in the comments section.

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Speedy/Speedy: Thea is not giving up on Roy. How soon before they both know Oliver's identity?

Hank: I'm hoping Thea never
See full article at TVfanatic »

Can film best the Brontës?

Haven't we seen it all before? Is there any point in film and television revisiting the Brontës, Austen and Dickens? Well, yes, especially if the renderings of the British classics are as innovative as the two set for imminent release – Andrea Arnold's Wuthering Heights and Cary Fukunaga's Jane Eyre

Christine Langan, who runs BBC Films, recently felt obliged to defend the latest cinematic adaptations of novels by Charlotte and Emily BrontëCary Fukunaga's Jane Eyre, which opens early next month, and Andrea Arnold's Wuthering Heights, due for release in November – against accusations of deja vu. "People," Langan sighed, "will be saying, 'Why the hell are they doing all that over again?'"

They are doing it, I'd suggest, because it needs to be done. Certain books – by the Brontës and by Jane Austen and Dickens – are indispensable to us and accompany us through life. When we first read them,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights: do we need new film versions?

Haven't we seen it all before? Is there any point in film and television revisiting the Brontës, Austen and Dickens? Well, yes, especially if the renderings of the British classics are as innovative as the two set for imminent release – Andrea Arnold's Wuthering Heights and Cary Fukunaga's Jane Eyre

Christine Langan, who runs BBC Films, recently felt obliged to defend the latest cinematic adaptations of novels by Charlotte and Emily BrontëCary Fukunaga's Jane Eyre, which opens early next month, and Andrea Arnold's Wuthering Heights, due for release in November – against accusations of deja vu. "People," Langan sighed, "will be saying, 'Why the hell are they doing all that over again?'"

They are doing it, I'd suggest, because it needs to be done. Certain books – by the Brontës and by Jane Austen and Dickens – are indispensable to us and accompany us through life. When we first read them,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Interview: Scott Evans Looks Back on an Amazing Year!

It’s been quite an amazing twelve months for Scott Evans, who until mid-summer of last year, was a minor recurring character on the ABC soap One Life to Live. But that was before the talented and daring writing crew at the show decided to reveal nerdy cop Oliver Fish as closeted and in love with his college lover, Kyle Lewis (Brett Claywell). Thus Kish was born and the couple quickly became one of daytime’s most talked about duos.

While other soaps have feared to tread too far into gay territory, Oltl has gone full bore crafting daytime’s first same-sex love triangle, boldly tackling the topic of gay marriage and giving fans the romantic payoff of the first love scene between two men on daytime television.

We talked to Evans about the past year, how it’s affected his life, his views on political subjects, working with his movie star brother Chris Evans,
See full article at The Backlot »

Love Story Author Segal Dies

  • WENN
Love Story Author Segal Dies
Author and acclaimed screenwriter Erich Segal, the man behind Oscar-winning film Love Story, has died. He was 72.

Segal passed away from a heart attack at his London home on Sunday.

Best known for his 1969 novel Love Story, which he wrote during his career as a professor at Harvard, Segal went on to receive an Academy Award nomination for the screenplay of the 1970 adaptation of his bestselling tome.

The film, which kickstarted the careers of Ryan O'Neal and Tommy Lee Jones, was a global hit, and picked up seven nods at the 1971 Oscars.

Segal also penned the screenplay for The Beatles' Yellow Submarine and Love Story sequel, Oliver's Story.

His funeral took place in Britain on Tuesday.

'Love Story' author Erich Segal passes away

  • Pop2it
Erich Segal, a classics scholar and best-selling novelist best known as the author of "Love Story," has died at his home in London.

Segal, who had suffered from Parkinson's disease for the past 25 years, died Sunday (Jan. 17) of heart failure. He was 72.

Born and raised in Brooklyn, Segal attended Harvard and was a classics professor at Yale when he wrote "Love Story," which became a runaway bestseller when it was released in 1970. He also wrote the script for the movie adaptation starring Ryan O'Neal and Ali MacGraw, which was released later that year and became a huge hit in its own right. Segal earned an Oscar nomination for his screenplay.

He wrote a sequel, "Oliver's Story," in 1977, and several other novels in addition to a number of scholarly works dealing with classical Greek literature. He taught at Yale, Princeton and Harvard before moving to England and taking a position at
See full article at Pop2it »

Erich Segal, Author Of "Love Story", Dead At Age 72

  • CinemaRetro
Erich Segal, whose razor-thin romance novel Love Story became a pop culture phenomenon, has died at age 72 from a heart attack in London. Segal's modest story about two love-struck Harvard college students resonated with a generation that was beset by civil unrest and the protest movement. The story is the ultimate soap opera, with the lead female character developing a terminal illness. Still, Segal's skillful prose tore at women's heartstrings and elevated the book to being a publishing sensation. Segal wrote the screenplay for the 1970 big screen adaptation which was a massive box-office hit and scored key Oscar nominations for the principals involved and elevated Ryan O'Neal and Ali MacGraw to stardom. The film's tag-line "Love means never having to say you're sorry" is still widely quoted today, though often in a satiric context.  Segal, who also wrote the screenplay for The Beatles' Yellow Submarine, never enjoyed success on this level again.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Love Story Author Erich Segal Dead at 72

Love Story Author Erich Segal Dead at 72
Long before Taylor Swift told us hers, Ryan O'Neal and Ali MacGraw were Love Story. Sadly, the man behind the beloved tale, Erich Segal, has written his last page. The author died of a heart attack in his London home on Sunday. He was 72. His tragically romantic novel Love Story was adapted into the 1970 film, which earned five Golden Globe Awards—including Best Picture, Drama and Best Screenplay for Segal—and seven Oscar nominations. While he's best known for that film and its sequel, Oliver's Story, Segal also wrote the screenplay for The Beatles' Yellow Submarine. Other best-selling novels include The Class, about the Harvard graduating class of 1958, and Doctors, a...
See full article at E! Online »

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