Animal House
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

13 items from 2015


‘Grand Budapest Hotel,’ ‘True Detective’ Top WGA Awards

14 February 2015 5:28 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Wes Anderson’s whimsical script for “The Grand Budapest Hotel” took the Writers Guild of America award for original screenplay, while Graham Moore’s script for codebreaking thriller “The Imitation Game” won for adapted screenplay.

HBO’s “True Detective” and FX’s “Louie” each took a pair of TV trophies.

“Alan Turing is the person for who we made this film,” Moore said in his acceptance speech at the Century Plaza in Los Angeles. “It is on the shoulders of his genius that we made this film.”

Anderson, who shares story credit with Hugo Guiness, recalled in his acceptance speech that it was appropriate to receive the award in Century City since he had worked with longtime collaborator Owen Wilson at a nearby motel many years ago.

“I can think of no greater neighborhood to accept this award in,” Anderson added.

“Grand Budapest” won over the scripts for “Boyhood,” “Foxcatcher, »

- Dave McNary

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Grand Budapest Hotel,’ ‘True Detective’ Top WGA Awards

14 February 2015 5:28 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Wes Anderson’s whimsical script for “The Grand Budapest Hotel” took the Writers Guild of America award for original screenplay, while Graham Moore’s script for codebreaking thriller “The Imitation Game” won for adapted screenplay.

HBO’s “True Detective” and FX’s “Louie” each took a pair of TV trophies.

“Alan Turing is the person for who we made this film,” Moore said in his acceptance speech at the Century Plaza in Los Angeles. “It is on the shoulders of his genius that we made this film.”

Anderson, who shares story credit with Hugo Guiness, recalled in his acceptance speech that it was appropriate to receive the award in Century City since he had worked with longtime collaborator Owen Wilson at a nearby motel many years ago.

“I can think of no greater neighborhood to accept this award in,” Anderson added.

“Grand Budapest” won over the scripts for “Boyhood,” “Foxcatcher, »

- Dave McNary

Permalink | Report a problem


From 'The Thin Man' to 'Dogfight': A broken-hearted Valentine's playlist

14 February 2015 11:30 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

It has not been an easy week. At the start of the week, we had our editorial meeting here at HitFix, as we do every Monday, to talk about both the week ahead and longer-term projects as well. For fairly obvious reasons, there was a fair amount of talk about Valentine's Day content, and I mentioned a few different ideas that I might write about, including one that I'll end up publishing at some point about Steve Martin. But even as I pitched a few ideas, I found myself uncomfortable with the entire idea of writing about romantic films right now. Honestly, I was hoping to spend this week with my head down and then just sail right through this weekend without writing about love at all, because for the first time in my adult life, I am no longer sure what I think about it. After all, I was with my wife for 14 years. »

- Drew McWeeny

Permalink | Report a problem


WGA Awards 2015: Honoree Harold Ramis Led Quiet Revolution in Comedy

12 February 2015 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The business of comedy writing in film is often a criminally under-laurelled one, and in life, multitalented writer-director-actor Harold Ramis only picked up a single screenwriting award (a Bafta for “Groundhog Day”) for a scripting career that spanned from “Animal House” to “Ghostbusters,” “Caddyshack” and “Back to School.”

Now the posthumous recipient of the WGA’s Laurel Award for Screenwriting Achievement, Ramis joins an august group of fellow funnymen including Mel Brooks, Blake Edwards, Paul Mazursky and Norman Krasna, and it’s hard to argue he doesn’t belong in their company.

During his decade-plus heyday, Ramis was the quietest kind of auteur, sculpting a new model for the modern comedy that came so naturally its novelty was easy to miss. Rooted in the frantic, countercultural anarchy of sketch comedy (his pre-film career included stints with National Lampoon and “Sctv”), Ramis’ work easily incorporated the rhythms of classic screwball comedy, »

- Andrew Barker

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: ‘Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story of the National Lampoon’

10 February 2015 2:04 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Punch-drunk and very much alive, “Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story of the National Lampoon” is a generous and briskly entertaining doc that traces the titular humor magazine’s lasting influence on American comedy. Although the film hews closely to the usual reminiscence-doc formula, ample laughs — both from the original magazine pieces and from their creators’ recollections — make this a real nonfiction crowdpleaser, with broader appeal than even a fest favorite like “Jodorowsky’s Dune.”

After “Smiling Through the Apocalypse: Esquire in the ‘6os” and “Hugh Hefner: Playboy, Activist and Rebel,” a cynic might suggest that one could take any publication that had its heyday in the 1960s or 1970s; interview the contributors who were there, man; and concoct a chatty doc-by-numbers. Even so, helmer Douglas Tirola (“All In: The Poker Movie”) pulls it off with style, not only assembling an impressive roster of former Lampoon contributors, orbiters and celebrity fans, »

- Ben Kenigsberg

Permalink | Report a problem


Helix series 2 episode 3 review: Scion

2 February 2015 12:53 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Helix loses some of its usual baffling nonsense this week, which makes it a great deal less fun...

This review contains spoilers.

2.3 Scion

The theme of this week’s Helix is mind-altering drugs. The sort that creative people take that make their scripts seem much better than they are in reality.

But first, those on the Helix team attended a meeting where someone asked ‘Why would anyone watch this show over Game Of Thrones?’, after which they all looked at the floor and then someone cooked up the character of Sister Amy.

After throwing herself at Kyle last week, Amy gets right down to business in an overly long opening sequence in which she unleashes her five fingers of fun on Uncle Fester fan, Landry. We’d already worked out that he’s easy to manipulate and I wondered if this scene went on so long to tell us more. »

- louisamellor

Permalink | Report a problem


Ivan Reitman interview: Draft Day, Baywatch, Evolution

31 January 2015 9:56 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Ivan Reitman talks Kevin Costner, sports movies and Baywatch, but not Ghostbusters...

You probably don't need us to tell you that Superbowl weekend has just been and gone in the Us. But maybe you might have missed Ivan Reitman's smart comedy-drama Draft Day. Following Kevin Costner as Sonny, it's a movie that's got a surface of sport, but isn't really about it at all.

We had the chance to speak to its director, Ivan Reitman, about working with Kevin Costner, sports movies, marketing, modern audiences, Six Days Seven Nights, and Evolution...

I'm from the UK, know next to nothing about American Football, and got to the end understanding all the things I needed to understand.

That's part of the magic trick of this movie. It's a bit like that wonderful movie Margin Call. You don't really know trading and all of that stuff, but you can still get very »

- simonbrew

Permalink | Report a problem


The Definitive Movies of 1995

30 January 2015 8:01 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

40. Empire Records

Directed by: Allan Moyle

Ah, the coming-of-age story. There was no sub-genre more hijacked for a quick buck in the 1990′s. In between the good ones (“Dazed and Confused,” “Boyz in the Hood”), the cheesy ones (“She’s All That,” “She Drives Me Crazy”), and the under-appreciated ones (“The Man in the Moon,” “Angus”), there were the middling ones that, if anything, boasted a cast that would go on to bigger, better things. Enter “Empire Records,” which is not only a coming-of-age story, but one that takes place at a record store, no less. Talk about the double dip. The entire film takes place over the course of one day, focusing on the employees, played by Anthony Lapaglia, Ethan Embry, Renee Zellweger, Rory Cochrane, and Liv Tyler. The independent record store is in Delaware – the hot spot of American music – and sees Joe (Lapaglia) allowing night manager Lucas »

- Joshua Gaul

Permalink | Report a problem


Poster for Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story of the National Lampoon

28 January 2015 2:30 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Coinciding with its screening as Sundance, a poster has been released for the documentary film Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Story of the National Lampoon, which has been created by Rick Meyerowitz, who produced the original poster for National Lampoon’s Animal House

The film looks back on the origins and wild heyday of the satire group. What began as a magazine started by Harvard classmates Douglas Kenney and Henry Beard in 1970 would eventually become a comedy behemoth of books, stage shows and movies, pushing the culture forward (via a mix of cutting satire and fart jokes) in a very uncertain decade.

Much like Chicago’s Second City, the group served as a springboard and mega-platform for some of the greatest comedic talents of the era, such as Chevy Chase, Gilda Radner, Bill Murray, and John Belushi. Drunk Stoned Brilliant Deaduses a mix of archival footage and interviews to tell »

- Gary Collinson

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Otis Day Entertains National Lampoon Sundance Party with Rowdy Version of "Shout"

27 January 2015 | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

The Sundance Film Festival isn't just about watching new movies on the big screen -- it's also about re-creating them on the dance floor, too. One of the most anticipated parties at this year's festival was in celebration of the terrific documentary about the history of National Lampoon called Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead. Featuring rare, never-before-seen footage, the film tracks the comedic publication and production company behind classics like Animal House and Vacation from its beginnings in the 1970s all the way through 2010.  Speaking of Animal House, Sundance partygoers were especially excited for this party because it was to feature togas and a performance from none other than Otis Day, who you might remember from this...   At some point after...

Read More

»

- Erik Davis

Permalink | Report a problem


'Groundhog Day's' Harold Ramis to receive WGA Awards lifetime achievement award

13 January 2015 1:53 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Harold Ramis, the man behind "Ghostbusters" and "Groundhog Day," passed away last February at the age of 69. Like many, the Writers Guild of America hasn't forgotten the impact he made over a 38-year career. The organization announced Tuesday that they will honor the writer/director/actor with the WGA's 2015 Laurel Award for Screenwriting Achievement at the Writers Guild Awards ceremony next month. Ramis' wife, Erica Mann Ramis, and family will accept the award on his behalf. In a release, WGAw Vice President Howard A. Rodman noted, "Harold Ramis changed the face of comedy. His death last year deprived us of his unique way of seeing the world, at once hilarious and wise. From his early work with 'National Lampoon' and 'Sctv' through 'Animal House,' 'Meatballs,' 'Caddyshack' and 'Ghostbusters,' Ramis' voice was strong, clear, outrageous in all the best ways. His unrealized projects »

- Gregory Ellwood

Permalink | Report a problem


Harold Ramis Honored by Writers Guild with Screen Laurel Award

13 January 2015 11:18 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Writers Guild of America West has selected the late Harold Ramis as the recipient of its Laurel Award for screenwriting achievement.

The award will be presented at the WGA Awards ceremony on Feb. 14, with Erica Mann Ramis and family accepting.

Harold Ramis changed the face of comedy,” said WGA West VP Howard A. Rodman. “His death last year deprived us of his unique way of seeing the world, at once hilarious and wise. From his early work with National Lampoon and Sctv through ‘Animal House,’ ‘Meatballs,’ ‘Caddyshack’ and ‘Ghostbusters,’ Ramis’ voice was strong, clear, outrageous in all the best ways.”

“His unrealized projects – an adaptation of ‘Confederacy of Dunces,’ a biopic about Emma Goldman – leave us aching with an anticipation that will never be fulfilled,” Rodman added. “And then there’s ‘Groundhog Day,’ one of modern cinema’s few true masterworks, a film that is impeccably crafted, morally astute, »

- Dave McNary

Permalink | Report a problem


Wgaw To Honor The Late Harold Ramis With Screen Laurel Award

13 January 2015 10:23 AM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

The Writers Guild of America, West has chosen late screenwriter-director-actor-producer Harold Ramis to receive its Laurel Award for Screenwriting Achievement, awarded to a Writers Guild member who has advanced the literature of motion pictures and made outstanding contributions to the profession of the screenwriter. Erica Mann Ramis and family will accept the award on Ramis’ behalf at the Writers Guild Awards ceremony on Saturday, February 14. Harold Ramis  passed away on February 24, 2014 at the age of 69. From today’s announcement:

Harold Ramis changed the face of comedy. His death last year deprived us of his unique way of seeing the world, at once hilarious and wise. From his early work with National Lampoon and Sctv through Animal House, Meatballs, Caddyshack, and Ghostbusters, Ramis’ voice was strong, clear, outrageous in all the best ways. His unrealized projects – an adaptation of Confederacy of Dunces, a biopic about Emma Goldman – leave us aching with »

- Denise Petski

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

13 items from 2015


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners