Animal House
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 30 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Drive-In Dust Offs: An American Werewolf In London

30 May 2015 11:09 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

The Werewolf film. A staple of the horror genre since Lon Chaney, Jr. got all out of sorts in The Wolf Man (1941), it’s popularity (like the moon itself) , has come and gone in cycles. Leading the pack in 1981, An American Werewolf in London showed the world that there was life in those old lycanthropes yet.

Released in August, An American Werewolf in London earned over 30 million in North America alone. It was a hit, and the reviews were generally favorable, especially in regards to the groundbreaking effects work by Rick Baker (he would go on to win the inaugural Academy Award for Outstanding Achievement in Makeup for this film – deservedly so).

Our tale goes like this: David (David Naughton - the Dr. Pepper guy from the TV commercials – ask your parents) and Jack (Griffin Dunne – After Hours), two Americans, are backpacking through the English countryside. They stop for a »

- Scott Drebit

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Animal House, Old School, Clueless and More! We Countdown the Top Party Scenes of All Time

27 May 2015 11:30 AM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

When it comes to letting loose, Animal House, for many of us, provided our first lesson on partying. From John Belushi who played the beloved John Blutarsky to John Vernon's role as Dean Vernon Wormer, the head of the fictional Faber College, the characters in the frat boy film are timeless—and we'll admit, we were never able to look at a toga in the same way after watching the 1978 classic.  25 years later, Old School introduced audiences to Frank the Tank (played by Will Ferrell) while simultaneously schooling us in the art of beer bong. And just four years after its release, Superbad hit the big screen, which illustrated why having a fake I.D. pretty »

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Joe Manganiello's Quotes About Magic Mike Xxl Might Blow Your Mind

25 May 2015 5:30 AM, PDT | BuzzSugar | See recent BuzzSugar news »

When we visited the set of Magic Mike Xxl, Channing Tatum made several lofty promises for this Summer's sequel, but costar Joe Manganiello (returning as "Big Dick Richie") is almost seeking to outdo him. With more definitive answers for the kind of movie this is (definitely a comedy) and how racy it's going to be (it's going to be "out there," he pledged), Manganiello has us even more excited for the movie. And not just that, in our interview with him and several other reporters on the Savannah, Ga, location, Manganiello spilled about fiancée Sofia Vergara, who was visiting him on set that day. Yes, he said the things you'd expect him to say, along with a little Tmi that might make you blush. Ready for Manganiello's antics? What are we going to learning about your character that we didn't learn in the last film? Joe Manganiello: This movie is an ensemble, »

- Shannon-Vestal

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With 'Entourage' arriving soon, we examine classic films about boys being boys

24 May 2015 11:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

A few nights ago, Warner Bros. hosted a very canny event that our own Louis Virtel attended at the Playboy Mansion, a screening of "Entourage" that may have felt like virtual reality for those who attended. While I doubt being surrounded by scantily clad bunnies influenced Louis one way or another on the film, it's likely you'll see a number of reviews that are perhaps more enthusiastic than they would otherwise be, and it'd be hard to blame anyone who fell for it. One of the reasons the setting seemed so right for that particular film is because much of the charge of "Entourage" is watching the core ensemble swagger their way through Hollywood, doing whatever they want and rarely if ever facing any consequences as a result. It's always presented with a wink and a smile, just a case of boys being boys. We live in a world right »

- Drew McWeeny

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Tenacious Eats Presents ‘Super-8 Marvel Munchies’ at Wizard World Comic Con

18 May 2015 6:44 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

If Christian Kane gets hungry this weekend at Wizard World Comic Con in St. Louis, he’ll likely head over to the Tenacious Eats Presents Super-8 Marvel Munchies event Saturday at 2.

Tenacious Eats “Movies for Foodies’ is a one-of-a-kind event where food is prepared and plated in front of you while you watch a film on the big screen. We’ve covered many of the movie-dinners here at We Are Movie Geeks. Now we’ll be teaming up with Tenacious Eats this Saturday at Wizard World Comic Con for an event we’re calling Tenacious Eats Presents Super-8 Marvel Munchies. It will be from 2pm to 2:45pm in Room 106 at America’s Center.

The astronomical success of The Avengers Age Of Ultron and its $200 Million worth of state-of-the-art CGI effects show how far the Marvel Universe has evolved. Marvel Comics very first foray into film was a 1966 syndicated package »

- Tom Stockman

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What was the best year in film history? HitFix readers continue the debate

1 May 2015 6:36 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

HitFix's recent spate of "Best Year in Film History" pieces inevitably spurred some furious debate among our readers, with some making compelling arguments for years not included in our pieces (2007 and 1968 were particularly popular choices) and others openly expressing their bewilderment at the inclusion of others (let's just say 2012 took a beating). In the interest of giving voice to your comments, below we've rounded up a few of the most thoughtful, passionate, surprising and occasionally incendiary responses to our pieces, including my own (I advocated for The Year of Our Lynch 2001, which is obviously the best). Here we go... Superstar commenter "A History of Matt," making an argument for 1968: The Graduate. Bullit. The Odd Couple. The Lion in Winter. Planet of the Apes. The Thomas Crown Affair. Funny Girl. Rosemary's Baby. And of course, 2001, A Space Odyssey. And that's only a taste of the greatness of that year. "Lothar the Flatulant, »

- Chris Eggertsen

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Why 1998 Was the Best Year In Film History

27 April 2015 12:46 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century.  Check here for a complete list of our essays. Just one glance at the Oscar nominees for 1998 might make it seem less a questionable choice for “best year in film” — and more an insane one.   Instead of a 1974 – The Godfather II, The Conversation, Chinatown, Blazing Saddles, Young Frankenstein, etc – or even a 1994, where Shawshank, Quiz Show, and Pulp Fiction lost to Gump – you choose a year where the Oscars would allow Roberto Benigni to climb atop both the figurative and literal chairs of the Shrine?   Fine, step away from the Oscars. Would you still celebrate a year that saw not one, but two movies about asteroids threatening the Earth?  A year that saw such scars carved across cinematic history as Patch Adams, My Giant, Stepmom, and Krippendorf’s Tribe?   It bears repeating: Krippendorf’S Tribe? »

- Michael Oates Palmer

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Why 1980 Was the Best Year in Movie History

27 April 2015 12:06 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century.  Click here for a complete list of our essays. How to decide in the grand scheme of things which film year stands above all others?  History gives us no clear methodology to unravel this thorny but extremely important question. Is it the year with the highest average score of movies?  So a year that averages out to a B + might be the winner over a field strewn with B’s, despite a few A +’s. Or do a few masterpieces lift up a year so far that whatever else happened beyond those three or four films is of no consequence? Both measures are worthy, and the winner by either of those would certainly be a year not to be sneezed at. But I contend the only true measure of a year’s »

- Richard Rushfield

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Unreeled: John Landis Retrospective Interview

19 April 2015 12:00 PM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

It's really difficult to not brag when you've had the same kind of conversation I recently did with John Landis, the same human who directed Animal House, The Kentucky Fried Movie, The Blues Brothers, An American Werewolf in London, ¡Three Amigos!, Trading Places, Michael Jackson's "Thriller," and dozens of other great moving pictures you and I adore. So, for this article, you are going to need to bear with a few of my gloats, please. I'm a nice guy who loves cats and grandmothers, so you can manage for a few paragraphs of crowing. (Or, just skip what I have to say and listen, I'll never know unless you comment that you skipped, which is just mean.) Landis was in Dallas over the weekend...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]

»

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Take Two: Do I Still Hate Ferris Bueller?

16 April 2015 5:08 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Our weekly series in which writers revisit for the first time in ages their youthful passions and reconsider how well they hold up with the passage of time. When “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off: was released in 1986, I was 17 years old ( a surly, difficult 17 years old); which is to say,I was the exact same age as the character Ferris Bueller; which is to say, the worst possible age to enjoy a film about him. To this put in some context, growing up in the late 1970’s and early 80’s was a glorious time to be a very young movie-goer.  Comedies in particular – were at their most bawdy and anarchic, which is exactly what a 10 year old boy wants. We were allowed to see on the screen in those days all sorts things that it is now horrifying to imagine a 10 year old was allowed to see; but as a 10 year old, »

- Richard Rushfield

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The Riot Club: When Being Posh Is Not Enough

30 March 2015 7:38 PM, PDT | www.culturecatch.com | See recent CultureCatch news »

Those of us who lead hapless lives know how frightening getting up in the morning can be. Instead of rising and embracing the daylight with an ardent cuddle and a zealous "Yahoo!" we see grey clouds overhead and wonder aloud, "What now?" Another egg carton with broken shells? A second bedbug infestation within twelve months? Still no replies to our Christian Mingles ad even though we've noted we can recite the Book of Revelation by heart in Latin?

Ah, if only we were born into a family of elites. The ultra-rich. Aristocrats with an enviable gene pool.

But instead we're impoverished and pear-shaped with squinty eyes and in need of Proactiv+.

On top of these misfortunes, we really know the gods are against us if while fingering the remote, we accidentally come across Joshua Jackson in The Skulls (2000), and begin to watch it out of inertia. This incapacitating thriller was inspired by Yale's secretive society, »

- Brandon Judell

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Take Two: Revisiting "Stir Crazy"

26 March 2015 3:29 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Our weekly series in which writers revisit for the first time in ages their youthful passions and reconsider how well they hold up with the passage of time. The late 1970’s were a glorious time to be first discovering movies. For a boy in his adolescence, there were of course the complete life-altering revelations of seeing “Jaws,” “Star Wars,” “Close Encounters” and eventually “Raiders” on opening day, surrounded by hundreds of other kids struck absolutely dumb at the spectacle before them. It was impossible to be young in those days and not become obsessed with the movies. But best of all were the comedies. It was an era when the genre was of re-inventing itself; moving out of the code restrictions that had hemmed comedy in since the dawn of Hollywood, the movies suddenly found itself let loose with acres of previously untouchable terrain to roam, and very few rules to guide them. »

- Richard Rushfield

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The Most Memorable Drunk Moments in Movies

16 March 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | BuzzSugar | See recent BuzzSugar news »

Since St. Patrick's Day is this week, it's only appropriate to highlight the most memorable drunk scenes in film - the good, the bad, and the laugh-out-loud funny. In honor of the beer-filled holiday, we're taking a look at unforgettable drunk moments from iconic movie parties, awkward hookup scenes, and more. From John Belushi chugging Jack Daniel's in Animal House to Renée Zellweger singing "All by Myself" in Bridget Jones's Diary, take a look at the best, most memorable drunk moments in movies. »

- Laura-Marie-Meyers

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The Voices: is Ryan Reynolds destined to be Hollywood's nearly man?

16 March 2015 2:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Reynolds knocks one out of the park in this kitschy comic horror, but marquee-topping stardom still seems to elude him

I’ve been a big fan of Ryan Reynolds since Van Wilder: Party Liaison in 2002, when he played a role not unlike Otter, Tim Matheson’s suavely degenerate Big Man On Campus in Animal House (the link was intentional: Matheson played Van’s dad). I’ve enjoyed him, if not his work, intermittently ever since. I like his blandly cheesy mall-rat good looks, which can be wimped down for comedy or buffed up for action, and his willingness to be serious and very silly. And now he has given us what may be the performance of his career, as a kindly serial killer in the bracingly dark and violent black comedy The Voices – and over here in the Us the thing gets a simultaneous VOD and limited theatrical release. »

- John Patterson

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Shout! TV Adds Stingray, Kentucky Fried Movie, & The Goode Family

6 March 2015 10:55 AM, PST | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

Shout! Factory TV, now in its second month, has added three more properties to their growing library of streaming content. These include Gerry Anderson’s Stingray, the Supermarionation series from the mid-1960s, the animated Goode Family, and the 1970s comedy Kentucky Fried Movie.

Shout! Factory TV is a premiere digital entertainment streaming service that brings timeless and contemporary cult favorites to pop culture fans. With a uniquely curated entertainment library, the channel offers an unrivaled blend of cult TV shows, movies, comedy, original specials and more – presenting an exciting entertainment alternative to other services.

Shout! Factory TV is available through any browser and has a Roku app.

The Goode Family (All 13 episodes)

The Goode Family, from executive producers Mike Judge (King of the Hill, Beavis and Butt-head, Office Space) and John Altschuler & Dave Krinsky (King of the Hill, Blades of Glory), comes to Shout! Factory TV this March.

A »

- ComicMix Staff

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26 Movie Soundtracks Getting Vinyl Reissues Including The Godfather, Jaws, Pulp Fiction & Beetlejuice

3 March 2015 | The Daily BLAM! | See recent The Daily BLAM! news »

[Press Release] Los Angeles -- Universal Music Enterprises has announced a rollout of 26 individual soundtrack albums on vinyl – including John Williams’ scores to E.T. and Jaws; Blaxploitation classics like Willie Hutch’s The Mack, J.J. Johnson’s Willie Dynamite, Marvin Gaye’s Trouble Man and the hip-hop-flavored Juice; Oscar® winners such as The Godfather, Silence of the Lambs, Rocky and Good Will Hunting; and cult movies like Paul Thomas Anderson’s Boogie Knights, John LandisAnimal House, Tim Burton’s Beetlejuice, Amy Heckerling’s Clueless and Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing. The rollout got underway on January 20, with the release of Willie Hutch’s classic, much-sampled soundtrack to the 1973 movie The Mack, starring Max Julien and Richard Pryor, which was originally released on »

- Pietro Filipponi

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‘Grand Budapest Hotel,’ ‘True Detective’ Top WGA Awards

14 February 2015 5:28 PM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Wes Anderson’s whimsical script for “The Grand Budapest Hotel” took the Writers Guild of America award for original screenplay, while Graham Moore’s script for codebreaking thriller “The Imitation Game” won for adapted screenplay.

HBO’s “True Detective” and FX’s “Louie” each took a pair of TV trophies.

“Alan Turing is the person for who we made this film,” Moore said in his acceptance speech at the Century Plaza in Los Angeles. “It is on the shoulders of his genius that we made this film.”

Anderson, who shares story credit with Hugo Guiness, recalled in his acceptance speech that it was appropriate to receive the award in Century City since he had worked with longtime collaborator Owen Wilson at a nearby motel many years ago.

“I can think of no greater neighborhood to accept this award in,” Anderson added.

“Grand Budapest” won over the scripts for “Boyhood,” “Foxcatcher, »

- Dave McNary

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‘Grand Budapest Hotel,’ ‘True Detective’ Top WGA Awards

14 February 2015 5:28 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Wes Anderson’s whimsical script for “The Grand Budapest Hotel” took the Writers Guild of America award for original screenplay, while Graham Moore’s script for codebreaking thriller “The Imitation Game” won for adapted screenplay.

HBO’s “True Detective” and FX’s “Louie” each took a pair of TV trophies.

“Alan Turing is the person for who we made this film,” Moore said in his acceptance speech at the Century Plaza in Los Angeles. “It is on the shoulders of his genius that we made this film.”

Anderson, who shares story credit with Hugo Guiness, recalled in his acceptance speech that it was appropriate to receive the award in Century City since he had worked with longtime collaborator Owen Wilson at a nearby motel many years ago.

“I can think of no greater neighborhood to accept this award in,” Anderson added.

“Grand Budapest” won over the scripts for “Boyhood,” “Foxcatcher, »

- Dave McNary

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From 'The Thin Man' to 'Dogfight': A broken-hearted Valentine's playlist

14 February 2015 11:30 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

It has not been an easy week. At the start of the week, we had our editorial meeting here at HitFix, as we do every Monday, to talk about both the week ahead and longer-term projects as well. For fairly obvious reasons, there was a fair amount of talk about Valentine's Day content, and I mentioned a few different ideas that I might write about, including one that I'll end up publishing at some point about Steve Martin. But even as I pitched a few ideas, I found myself uncomfortable with the entire idea of writing about romantic films right now. Honestly, I was hoping to spend this week with my head down and then just sail right through this weekend without writing about love at all, because for the first time in my adult life, I am no longer sure what I think about it. After all, I was with my wife for 14 years. »

- Drew McWeeny

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WGA Awards 2015: Honoree Harold Ramis Led Quiet Revolution in Comedy

12 February 2015 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The business of comedy writing in film is often a criminally under-laurelled one, and in life, multitalented writer-director-actor Harold Ramis only picked up a single screenwriting award (a Bafta for “Groundhog Day”) for a scripting career that spanned from “Animal House” to “Ghostbusters,” “Caddyshack” and “Back to School.”

Now the posthumous recipient of the WGA’s Laurel Award for Screenwriting Achievement, Ramis joins an august group of fellow funnymen including Mel Brooks, Blake Edwards, Paul Mazursky and Norman Krasna, and it’s hard to argue he doesn’t belong in their company.

During his decade-plus heyday, Ramis was the quietest kind of auteur, sculpting a new model for the modern comedy that came so naturally its novelty was easy to miss. Rooted in the frantic, countercultural anarchy of sketch comedy (his pre-film career included stints with National Lampoon and “Sctv”), Ramis’ work easily incorporated the rhythms of classic screwball comedy, »

- Andrew Barker

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 30 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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